Tim Cook shares remembrance of Steve Jobs, who would have been 63 today

On what would have been his 63rd birthday, Tim Cook took to Twitter today to offer remembrance of Steve Jobs. The Apple co-founder was born on February 24th, 1955 and would be celebrating his 63rd birthday this year…

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What did Barack Obama say at his secret sports speech in front of hundreds of people?

Attendees at Barack Obama’s speech at the Sloan Sports Analytics ConferenceBarack Obama spoke in front of several hundred people yesterday at a sports conference.

We don’t know what he said.

That’s because Obama’s session at MIT’s Sloan Sports Analytics Conference was off the record — conference organizers prevented attendees from tweeting, livestreaming or reporting on any part of Obama’s appearance during or after the event.

The penalty for breaking the rules, per Sloan: You couldn’t come back to Sloan.

Sloan is a conference dedicated to the Moneyball wing of sports business and fandom. It’s the kind of place you can go to see Nate Silver chatting with Steve Ballmer.

It makes sense that Sloan would want Obama to come and discuss “a wide range of subjects… from his most memorable moments in the White House, to his post-presidency plans,” along with Kraft Analytics CEO Jessica Gelman and Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey.

But I can’t fathom why that talk would be off-the-record. I’ve asked a Sloan rep for comment; a rep for ESPN, which is the lead sponsor for the event, declined to comment.

It looks like Reporters For Sports Outlets You’ve Heard Of complied with Sloan’s rules, which isn’t surprising. Complying with rules of the events you attend is the kind of thing you do when you’re a Reporter For Sports Outlets You’ve Heard Of.

ESPN had a pre-write of Obama’s appearance (and obliquely referenced the off the record part in the headline, and spelled it out in the last graph), but nothing else. And if there was any coverage at all from Sports Illustrated, Bleacher Report or my Vox Media colleagues at SB Nation, I missed it. Ditto for the bad boys at Deadspin and Barstool Sports. (Barstool does not like Obama’s portrait, though).

Still: It’s 2018. There’s no such thing as an off-the-record event, especially not one held in the United States, in front of hundreds of people with internet-connected phones, right?

Maaaaybe. Here’s a post from Justin McMahon, whose bio describes him as a student at UNC Chapel Hill and the CEO of Daily Insider, a fantasy sports site.

I’m not sure Justin was actually at the Sloan event, though some of his preceding tweets were about other Sloan speakers. I’ve asked him for more information.

And here are a couple from someone who controls the Twitter account for Women in Sports Tech, whose Twitter stream suggests they were also at the event:

@Simon_pouliot’s timeline has three tweets. This is one of them.

Alanna Astion’s bio says she’s getting a masters at UMass in sport management. This is one of the two Sloan tweets she published today:

And… that’s it?

All those people? Nothing else? Really?

If I’ve missed something, please let me know. And if you attended and want to share something confidentially, that would also be great. My email is on my bio page.

(UPDATE: Heard from one bold attendee who passed along this assessment of Obama’s comments: “It was the kind of stuff that you would say at a high school graduation. I don’t know why it would have to be off the record.” Thank you, bold attendee! Happy to hear from others.)

But to recap:

  • Anyone can go to one of Donald Trump’s private golf clubs and come away with photos of the The President of the United States watching TV, or discussing his North Korea strategy.
  • The last President of the United States spoke at a public forum yesterday where he may have discussed: the importance of playing team sports; his support for diversity in sports, and the need for reform in college sports.
  • But we don’t know that for sure, because there was a surprisingly effective media blackout.

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alcatel 3-series phones unveiled: sub-€200 price tag for 18:9 screens and dual cameras

There are three phones in alcatel’s new 3-series and each has its own strengths. As with the others, these go all-in on 18:9 screens and leverage TCL’s TV-building know-how. And unlike the alcatel 5, two of the 3-series phones have dual cameras on their backs. All three models have fingerprint readers on the back, but also feature alcatel’s Face Key feature that can unlock the phone with a glance in half a second (this feature is based on Android’s standard Face unlock capabilities so don’t put your hopes too high). alcatel 3V The 3V is the only one in the new line-up with a 1080p+…

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OnePlus is fixing its 5 and 5T to play Netflix in HD, but you have to physically send your phone in to get it

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

OnePlus’ phones are a great value, but they’ve each individually had a few drawbacks. One negative they all had in common, though, was a DRM deficiency. None of the company’s handsets supported the correct DRM level required for HD playback in Netflix. Distress on the subject came to a head late last year, and OnePlus surprisingly announced that it would add the feature in the future. In a comment on OnePlus’ forums today the company confirmed that it was now able to update handsets to support it, but the process will require that you send the phone back to OnePlus for the update. 

The deficiency stems from OnePlus’ failure to perform the steps required to reach the L1 security level in Google’s Widevine DRM, which is required by Netflix for HD playback.

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OnePlus is fixing its 5 and 5T to play Netflix in HD, but you have to physically send your phone in to get it was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Using “Nanodrops” to Repair Corneas Could Ultimately Replace Glasses

New eye drops developed by researchers from the Shaare Zedek Medical Center and Bar-Ilan University in Israel can improve both nearsightedness and farsightedness, the inventors claim. However, so far the “nanodrops” have only been successfully tested on pigs’ corneas.

The eye drops are “a new concept for correcting refractory problems,” said David Smadja, one of the ophthalmologists who worked on the eye drops, at Shaare Zedek’s research day on Feb. 21, as reported by The Jerusalem Post. The patented drops use nanotechnology to improve vision.

According to the National Eye Institute, both children and adults can develop either nearsightedness or farsightedness. Around five to 10 percent of Americans suffer from farsightedness, and it becomes more likely to develop if both parents are also farsighted. Nearsightedness, however, currently affects around 42 percent of Americans between the ages of 12 and 54, with those living in urban environments more than twice as likely to develop the condition.

Smadja explained during the research day that the nanodrops could potentially be used for more than just correcting someone’s corneas. Replacing multifocal lenses is also feasible, which would enable people to focus on objects from various distances.

Patients would have to launch an app on their phones to measure their eyes’ refraction and create a laser pattern. This pattern would then be “stamped” onto the corneal surface of the eyes.

While a promising development, Smadja didn’t say how often the eye drops need to be applied in order to fix a person’s corneas or ultimately replace glasses. Furthermore, what additional work needs to be done before moving on to human trials was not discussed. One factor that may need to be determined is whether the eye drop solution is toxic to humans, and another is how much of the solution is needed per application in order to make an impact.

Sight is one of the most important senses we have, and scientists continue to research ways to maintain and improve it. Alongside Smadja’s nanodrops, work has been done to determine if stem cells can effectively treat macular degeneration, and the Ocumetics Technology Corporation is working on a bionic eye that could prevent cataracts and push eyesight beyond 20/20 vision. As we continue to discover new ways to upgrade our senses and abilities, we advance closer and closer to a world of enhanced humans.

The post Using “Nanodrops” to Repair Corneas Could Ultimately Replace Glasses appeared first on Futurism.

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