How to Suspend a Credit or Debit Card in Wallet & Apple Pay on iPhone

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If your credit or debit card is lost or stolen, you’ll want to suspend it in your iPhone’s Wallet & Apple Pay app. If your phone is lost or stolen, you’ll also probably want to remotely erase your device. Better safe than the sorry victim of credit card fraud or identity theft! So how do we go about suspending lost or stolen credit cards to prevent someone else from using them? And how can we suspend our cards if our iPhone is also gone? Don’t panic; in just a few easy steps you can suspend credit cards in Apple Pay on your iPhone, or  remotely if your iPhone’s been lost or stolen and you have access to another smartphone or computer.

Related: How to Set a Default Credit Card & Remove an Outdated Card in Wallet & Apple Pay on iPhone

How to Suspend a Credit or Debit Card in Wallet & Apple Pay on iPhone

If you’re sure your card is lost or stolen, immediately contact your credit card company or bank to report the theft so they can suspend your card. Now, when you look in your Wallet & Apple Pay you’ll see the message “This Card Cannot Be Used.” If you’re still concerned, you can delete the card from Wallet &Apple Pay as well.​​

  • Go to Settings.
  • Scroll down and tap on Apple Wallet & Apple Pay.

lost credit card apple payapple wallet delete card

  • Tap on the card that was stolen.
  • Scroll down and select Remove Card.

delete stolen card apple payhow to delete credit card apple wallet

Suspend Apple Pay with Find My iPhone

For this tip, you’ll need to have set up Find My iPhone before the phone was lost or stolen. If you’ve done this, you’ll be able to activate Lost Mode from icloud.com, or from a family member’s iPad or iPhone, provided they’re enrolled in the same Family Sharing Plan as you. You can reenable Apple Pay once you’ve recovered your iphone.

  • Go to icloud.com and log in to your account.
  • Tap Open Find My iPhone.

icloud.comicloud.com find my iphone

  • Sign in to Find My iPhone.
  • After a search Find My iPhone will deliver a list of your devices, click on the one that is lost or stolen.

icloud find my iphonei cloud find my iphone

  • Now, click on Lost Mode. This function will disable any and all cards in Apple Pay. 

icloud find my phone

Even though it’s terrible to lose your credit card or phone, I hope this tip has made things a little easier for you in the process of securing your financial information. 

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Here are the New York Times and Observer stories that pushed Facebook to suspend Trump’s data analytics company

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Cambridge Analytica had profile information for some 50 million Facebook users, according to reports.

Now we know what prompted Facebook to suspend Cambridge Analytica, the data analytics firm the Trump campaign used during the 2016 election: The company was trying to get ahead of big stories about Cambridge in both The New York Times and the Observer.

Both stories hit Saturday morning, and claim that Cambridge Analytica had amassed a data trove with information from more than 50 million Facebook users it collected without their permission.

That’s a much larger number than Facebook reported last night, when it said that just 270,000 people “gave their consent” to hand over data to a third party researcher and University of Cambridge professor named Dr. Aleksandr Kogan.

How does that work? Back in 2015, Kogan, who also worked at a company called Global Science Research, created an app called “thisisyourdigitallife,” which used Facebook’s login feature that lets people join a third party app with their Facebook account, instead of creating a new app-specific account. Some 270,000 people logged into the app that way, granting Kogan permission under Facebook’s rules to scrape some of their profile data, including their identity and things that they’ve “liked.”

But that permission also gave Kogan access to data about the friend networks of these 270,000 people, which amounted to tens of millions of Facebook users, according to The Times. Kogan then shared that data with Cambridge Analytica, which was “building psychographic profiles” on American voters in order to target them with ads.

Here’s a key graph from the Times’s story:

“[Kogan] ultimately provided over 50 million raw profiles to the firm, Mr. Wylie said, a number confirmed by a company email and a former colleague. Of those, roughly 30 million contained enough information, including places of residence, that the company could match users to other records and build psychographic profiles. Only about 270,000 users — those who participated in the survey — had consented to having their data harvested.”

Kogan and Cambridge Analytica both certified to Facebook that it had destroyed this data back in 2015, but “copies of the data still remain beyond Facebook’s control,” The New York Times is reporting.

Cambridge Analytica claims that the data has been deleted, and that it had no idea it was collected in ways that violated Facebook’s terms of service.

“When it subsequently became clear that the data had not been obtained by GSR in line with Facebook’s terms of service, Cambridge Analytica deleted all data received from GSR,” a company spokesperson said in a statement sent to Recode. “We worked with Facebook over this period to ensure that they were satisfied that we had not knowingly breached any of Facebook’s terms of service and also provided a signed statement to confirm that all Facebook data and their derivatives had been deleted.”

“No data from GSR was used by Cambridge Analytica as part of the services it provided to the Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign,” the statement added.

Facebook, for its part, is adamant that the company did nothing wrong — the data was collected appropriately under its terms of service, it was then abused by the collector. Facebook’s Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos said it bluntly on Twitter Saturday morning: “[Kogan] lied to those users and he lied to Facebook about what he was using the data for.”

It’s an illuminating look at how Cambridge Analytica and the Trump campaign “won” Facebook during the campaign — Trump’s Facebook strategy has been identified as a key factor in his surprising victory.

But the stories also leave a number of unanswered questions:

  • How helpful was the data in targeting U.S. voters? How much of a difference did it make?
  • Will Facebook change its policies to further limit the data that third parties can collect from its users?
  • How much of the data is still out there online, and is it being used by the Trump campaign today?

Recode – All

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Apple to suspend iTunes Store support for “obsolete” first-gen Apple TV

Enlarge / The first-generation Apple TV (credit: David Kidd)

A support document from Apple drives another nail in the coffin for the original Apple TV, first introduced in 2007. On May 25, 2018, first-generation Apple TV devices will no longer be able to connect to the iTunes Store due to new security changes to be implemented by Apple. In addition to first-gen Apple TVs, any PCs running Windows XP or Windows Vista will also lose access to the most recent version of iTunes.

According to the document, the “obsolete” original Apple TV won’t be updated in the future to support access to the iTunes Store. After May 25, users will only be able to access iTunes on second-generation Apple TVs and newer streaming devices.

The same security changes affecting the first-gen Apple TV will also affect Windows XP and Vista machines. Users on such devices can still run previous versions of iTunes, so they should still be able to play their music library without problems.

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apple – Ars Technica

Multiple Bitcoin debit card providers suspend service under orders of Visa


The Bitcoin community is reeling after several pre-paid crypto debit card providers abruptly suspended service. The companies affected include Bitwala, Cryptopay, Wirex, and TenX. These services allow individuals to spend cryptocurrencies — predominantly Bitcoin — in traditional brick-and-mortar establishments through a debit card issued by one of the major providers, Visa and MasterCard. Following an announcement from our card issuer on behalf of Visa Europe, Bitwala cards are taken out of operation starting today. Our team is holding an emergency meeting to resolve the issue with the card holders best interest in mind and will make an update shortly. —…

This story continues at The Next Web

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South Korean court rejects Qualcomm request to suspend $912M antitrust ruling

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In a move likely to aid Apple, a South Korean court has turned down a Qualcomm motion to suspend a December order by the Korea Fair Trade Commission, which leveled a $ 912.34 million fine against the chipmaker and directed it to fix how it handles patent licensing and chip sales.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News