The Darkest Material in the World is Coming to the Olympics

The Darkest Olympics

At the upcoming 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea, spectators will be plunged into the blackest void, a “schism of space,” as described to CNN by Asif Khan, a British architect who will be using Vantablack to create an unmatched display at the event. Vantablack is known as the darkest material ever created — it is so unimaginably black that the human eye actually has trouble processing exactly what it is seeing.

Khan’s exhibit will allow all Olympics participants and spectators to fully experience Vantablack’s unique properties. Khan is creating a building that visitors will encounter in the Olympic Park — it will have four curved walls, but will look rather 2-dimensional from a distance, resembling a crevice through which you peer into the depths of space. This effect will be doubled by tiny lights, appearing as stars, that will be placed onto the structure.

The same object coated in Vantablack appears 2-dimensional. Image Credit: Surrey NanoSystems
The same object coated in Vantablack appears 2-dimensional. Image Credit: Surrey NanoSystems

The illusion is possible because objects covered in Vantablack are so dark that they are thought to be the closest visual representation of a black hole that we currently are capable of creating. This is because Vantablack isn’t a color or a paint — it a material that actually simulates the complete absence of color, absorbing 99.96 percent of the light that hits its surface.

Creating the Void

First developed three years ago by Surrey NanoSystems, Vantablack is equipped with carbon nanotubes that absorb almost all light instead of reflecting it. This unique property has made the world’s darkest material the subject of intense study for application by aerospace engineers, architects, artists, in wiring on microchips, in touch screens, and so much more. Its applications are even doubled as its unique properties also allow it to absorb heat particularly well.

An coated in Vantablack appears 2-dimensional and is difficult to perceive. Image Credit: Surrey NanoSystems
An object coated in Vantablack appears 2-dimensional and is difficult to perceive. Image Credit: Surrey NanoSystems

Spectators at the 2018 Olympics in South Korea will really be in for a unique experience, Khan said in an interview with CNN. “It will be like you’re looking into the depths of space itself. As you approach the building that star field will grow to fill your entire field of view, and then you’ll enter as though you’re being absorbed into a cloud of blackness.”

The post The Darkest Material in the World is Coming to the Olympics appeared first on Futurism.

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‘Darkest Dungeon’ for iPad Has Finally Released on the App Store

Red Hook Studios have flirted with the concept of their 2016 critical and commercial hit Darkest Dungeon [$ 4.99 (HD)] making the transition to mobile for some time now. While the PC and PS4 versions of the title were essential purchases, the game’s Vita port emphasised its potential for portable play, and so a move to tablet devices was always a natural progression for the developers to make. Finally, after what has felt like years of impatient anticipation, Darkest Dungeon has made its way to the iPad. With a beautiful gothic graphical style, and a clever twist on the turn-based RPG formula with its stress mechanic, Darkest Dungeon is the latest in a line of essential indie releases on the App Store, and is available to download for $ 4.99 exclusively for tablet devices.

I cannot say enough good things about Darkest Dungeon, as its detailed, hand drawn characters combined with its meticulously detailed systems create an incredibly immersive world that is engrossing from start to finish. The game’s Affliction System means your cast of characters (there are sixteen playable classes to experiment with) have to battle their own demons rather than simply the ones encountered in the dystopian backdrops. Of course, the biggest feature of Darkest Dungeon on tablets is the very fact it is on an iPad. With a touch interface and the option to easily pause the game as you put your device into your bag (or huge pockets, if you’re truly hardcore), the iPad is unequivocally the best way to play Darkest Dungeon. Cross platform saving through Dropbox is also a neat inclusion for those who own the game on PC, and The Crimson Court DLC that has just hit consoles is also set to launch on iOS later this year.

Darkest Dungeon’s critical reception and abundant accolades upon its wider console release last year only further emphasise the game’s qualities, and with early signs suggesting the iPad iteration is a carefully crafted and well-considered port, the App Store release is undoubtedly the best time to see what all the fuss is about. Darkest Dungeon is available for $ 4.99 on tablet devices today – if you’re looking for more discussion on the game, venture down to our forum thread for early impressions on this exciting new release.

TouchArcade

‘Darkest Dungeon’ iOS Release Chance “Extremely High”

The PC game Darkest Dungeon is a fantastic roguelike RPG that’s been very successful, and it looks like we’re very close to getting it on our tablets. Back in 2016, we wrote a story about a blog post from the Darkest Dungeon‘s developers where they announced they were considering bringing the game to tablets, but we haven’t heard much till then, until today that is. The developers just finished a Reddit AMA in celebration of the game’s DLC, Crimson Court, and stated that the chance of a tablet release is “extremely high,” which is great news to me and, possible, many of you. No other details on a tablet release were discussed—and no references to phones either—but it does look like we’re getting the game after all.

If you haven’t heard about the game yet, this roguelike RPG highlights the psychological stresses that come with adventuring as your band of heroes gradually suffer from stress and even madness. They can get paranoid, greedy, angry, and even hopeless, and those mental states have direct effects on gameplay. Add to that the fantastic art, and you can see why I really want to get it on my tablet. We’ll let you know once we have more information.

TouchArcade