Apple HomePod may leave white rings on some wood furniture

Apple HomePod white rings wood furniture

The HomePod is now available to the public and blasting tunes in owners’ homes, but Apple’s device is doing more to peoples’ homes than just filling them with music.

Some Apple HomePod owners have found that the smart speaker can leave a white ring on wood furniture. The Wirecutter discovered in its HomePod review that the device left a white ring on both an oiled butcher block countertop as well as a wooden side table. Owners on Twitter have noticed the issue, too.

When asked about the white rings, Apple confirmed the problem and said that “the markets can improve over several days after the speaker is removed from the wood surface.” If the rings don’t go away on their own, Apple suggests that users “try cleaning the surface with the manufacturer’s suggested oiling method.”

This is a weird issue that could be serious if HomePod ends up damaging expensive wooden furniture. It’s kind of a weird problem for the HomePod to have since we haven’t heard any other smart speakers running into the same issue, and it’ll be interesting to see what exactly is causing these white rings to appear.

HomePod owners, have you noticed any white rings on your furniture?

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Apple Confirms HomePod Can Leave White Rings on Wood Surfaces With Oil or Wax Finishes [Updated]

Apple has issued a statement confirming that the HomePod can possibly leave white rings on wood surfaces with an oil or wax finish.

Image: Wirecutter

The strange discovery was brought to light in HomePod reviews published by Wirecutter and Pocket-lint, as highlighted by VentureBeat, while at least one customer shared a picture of the same problem on Twitter.

Pocket-lint‘s Stuart Miles:

For our tests we placed the speaker on a solid oak kitchen worktop treated with Danish oil.

Within 20 minutes the HomePod had caused a white discoloured ring to appear on the wood that some days later has faded, although still hasn’t completely disappeared.

We subsequently tested the HomePod on other materials: the same wood that hadn’t been treated with Danish oil and a regular lacquered desk and haven’t seen the same issues.

Apple told Pocket-lint that it is “not unusual” for a speaker with a silicone base to leave a “mild mark” when placed on certain oiled or waxed surfaces, suggesting the rings are caused by chemical interactions with treated wood.

Image: Pocket-lint

Apple told Wirecutter that “the marks can improve over several days after the speaker is removed from the wood surface.” If not, Apple recommends “cleaning the surface with the manufacturer’s suggested oiling method.”

The HomePod can damage wood furniture: An unhappy discovery after we placed a HomePod on an oiled butcher-block countertop and later on a wooden side table was that it left a defined white ring in the surface. Other reviewers and owners have reported the same issue, which an Apple representative has confirmed. Apple says “the marks can improve over several days after the speaker is removed from the wood surface,” and if they don’t fade on their own, you can basically just go refinish the furniture—the exact advice Apple gave in an email to Wirecutter was to “try cleaning the surface with the manufacturer’s suggested oiling method.”

It’s unclear at this point whether the issue is limited to treated wood, or if the problem could cause any sort of long-term damage to the HomePod’s rubber base. For now, we would obviously recommend not placing your HomePod on a surface with an oil or wax finish if possible.

Wirecutter conducted some additional testing and saw no visible damage when placing the HomePod on glass, granite countertop, nice fiberboard, polyurethane-sealed wood, and cheap IKEA bookcases.

Update: Apple shared a “Cleaning and taking care of HomePod” support document that includes a section called “Where to place HomePod.” This section includes details on the silicone base of the device and warns that it can cause marks on some wooden surfaces.

HomePod is designed for indoor use only. When using HomePod, make sure to place it on a solid surface. Place the power cord so that it won’t be walked on or pinched.

It is not unusual for any speaker with a vibration-dampening silicone base to leave mild marks when placed on some wooden surfaces. The marks can be caused by oils diffusing between the silicone base and the table surface, and will often go away after several days when the speaker is removed from the wooden surface. If not, wiping the surface gently with a soft damp or dry cloth may remove the marks. If marks persist, clean the surface with the furniture manufacturer’s recommended cleaning process. If you’re concerned about this, we recommend placing your HomePod on a different surface.

Apple also suggests users avoid putting the HomePod near heat sources and liquids, and advises users that it can be cleaned with a damp cloth.

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Apple: HomePod may leave white rings on wood surfaces [updated]

Apple on Wednesday issued a statement confirming reports that the HomePod can leave visible marks on select wooden surfaces. In early reviews, Wirecutter and other publications noted that when placing the HomePod on treated wooden surfaces, a ring-shaped mark develops beneath the speaker within as little as 20 minutes.

Here’s the blurb about the marks from Wirecutter’s review:

The HomePod can damage wood furniture: An unhappy discovery after we placed a HomePod on an oiled butcher-block countertop and later on a wooden side table was that it left a defined white ring in the surface. Other reviewers and owners have reported the same issue, which an Apple representative has confirmed.

And here’s Apple’s official response to the publication:

Apple says “the marks can improve over several days after the speaker is removed from the wood surface,” and if they don’t fade on their own, you can basically just go refinish the furniture—the exact advice Apple gave in an email to Wirecutter was to “try cleaning the surface with the manufacturer’s suggested oiling method.” 

Apple also adds that it’s not unusual for speakers with a silicon base to leave small marks when placed on certain oiled or waxed surfaces—it has something to do with a chemical reaction to treated wood. Still, for a product that is touted for its beautiful design, this is not a good look. Especially given all of the criticism it’s been taking in other areas.

Source: Wirecutter

Update: Apple has posted a new support document entitled “Cleaning and Taking Care of HomePod,” with a section called Where to Place HomePod.

HomePod is designed for indoor use only. When using HomePod, make sure to place it on a solid surface. Place the power cord so that it won’t be walked on or pinched.

It is not unusual for any speaker with a vibration-dampening silicone base to leave mild marks when placed on some wooden surfaces. The marks can be caused by oils diffusing between the silicone base and the table surface, and will often go away after several days when the speaker is removed from the wooden surface. If not, wiping the surface gently with a soft damp or dry cloth may remove the marks. If marks persist, clean the surface with the furniture manufacturer’s recommended cleaning process. If you’re concerned about this, we recommend placing your HomePod on a different surface.


Apple: HomePod may leave white rings on wood surfaces [updated]” is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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Apple updates HomePod support page, warns about marks on wood

A number of HomePod owners have started noticing rings left on wooden surfaces, particularly those with oil-based finishes. The silicone in the base of the HomePod can react to oil on a molecular level, causing these marks or rings. This type of problem is not specific to the HomePod, in fact, all kinds of speakers (or anything with a silicone base like an Amazon Echo Dot) can cause these kinds of marks on wood. Because of this, Apple has updated its HomePod support page with the following information regarding the HomePod and wooden surfaces. It is not unusual for any speaker with a…

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