Apple reportedly wants MicroLED Apple Watch screens in 2018, AR and big screens later

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A MicroLED display shown off by Samsung at CES.


A report this morning from Taiwanese supply chain publication DigiTimes suggests that Apple’s plans for producing next-generation MicroLED screens could be more ambitious than originally expected. According to the report, Apple is already working with Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) on small and large screens for three separ…Read More
Apple – VentureBeat
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Arbtr wants to create an anti-feed where users can only share one thing at a time

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At a time when the models of traditional social networks are being questioned, it’s more important than ever to experiment with alternatives. Arbtr is a proposed social network that limits users to sharing a single thing at any given time, encouraging “ruthless self-editing” and avoiding “nasty things” like endless feeds filled with trivial garbage.

It’s seeking funds on Kickstarter and could use a buck or two. I plan to.

Now, I know what you’re thinking. “Why would I give money to maybe join a social network eventually that might not have any of my friends on it on it? That is, if it ever even exists?” Great question.

The answer is: how else do you think we’re going to replace Facebook? Someone with a smart, different idea has to come along and we have to support them. If we won’t spare the cost of a cup of coffee for a purpose like that, then we deserve the social networks we’ve got. (And if I’m honest, I’ve had very similar ideas over the last few years and I’m eager to see how they might play out in reality.)

The fundamental feature is, of course, the single-sharing thing. You can only show off one item at a time, and when you post a new one, the old one (and any discussion, likes, etc) will be deleted. There will be options to keep logs of these things, and maybe premium features to access them (or perhaps metrics), but the basic proposal is, I think, quite sound — at the very least, worth trying.

Some design ideas for the app. I like the text one but it does need thumbnails.

If you’re sharing less, as Arbtr insists you will, then presumably you’ll put more love behind those things you do share. Wouldn’t that be nice?

We’re in this mess because we bought wholesale the idea that the more you share, the more connected you are. Now that we’ve found that isn’t the case – and in fact we were in effect being fattened for a perpetual slaughter — I don’t see why we shouldn’t try something else.

Will it be Arbtr? I don’t know. Probably not, but we’ve got a lot to gain by giving ideas like this a shot.

Mobile – TechCrunch

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‘Fortnite’ wants to put your dance in the game

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The free-to-play Fortnite: Battle Royale has become a cultural sensation with a wide-ranging playerbase. How do we know? Because professional sports players won't stop mimicking the game's weird dances in real life. Maybe one day they'll be doing one…
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The Government Wants To Share Your Health Data. That’s Not A Terrible Idea.

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The Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) want to give you more access to your healthcare data. And they want to help third party companies get at it, too, according to an announcement earlier this month and a recent article from Stat News.

That might sound scary, especially since you’ve been hearing a lot about your data lately, in part thanks to Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal. Especially because it’s your medical data, and what could be more personal than that?

But it’s actually not that bad an idea.

First, a little background. In your lifetime you’ve created a tremendously detailed cache of healthcare data. Checkups, dental procedures, medications, that one ER visit in college… all of this information is about your body and could be used to create a picture of your overall health.

There’s a catch: that data is stored in four different systems. And they don’t automatically share data with one another — your dentist’s office won’t send your records to your doctor’s office unless you ask. Lacking access to complete records increases the risk of unnecessary treatments and medical error.

In CMS’s vision, all that data would be available in a central location patients can access anywhere, anytime. The program, called MyHealthEData, would give care providers all that information so they could offer patients the best possible treatment, especially in emergencies.

The program goes one step further  it wants to hand this history over to third party companies as well. That could include medical researchers, health app creators, and pharmaceutical manufacturers. Sharing it could further medical research by providing scientists with data that is otherwise hard to access, leading to treatments that are more effective and better tailored to individual patients.

There are risks, of course. So much valuable data in one place is basically a bull’s eye for hackers. Government infrastructure has been the target of such attacks before, and they are likely to increase in the future.

One thing you at least don’t need to worry about? CMS intentionally sharing your data without your knowledge. Thanks, HIPAA (the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPPA) established a national standard of health data protection and security measures which ensure your records can’t be shared without your consent)!

The ultimate result may be a healthcare ecosystem in which medical professionals, your devices, and patients themselves are better connected. A physician who can see data from a patient’s smartwatch, for example, might be better able to see the signs of a heart attack before it happens.

That kind of system is still a ways off. But to get there, we’ll need to pay close attention to who has access to all our medical records, and especially how those records can be protected. If we do it right, our lives will be the better for it. And if we don’t, well, hackers will auction off our medical data to the highest bidder. The stakes are pretty high.

The post The Government Wants To Share Your Health Data. That’s Not A Terrible Idea. appeared first on Futurism.

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[Update: Post deleted] LG wants to know how you really feel about displays with notches

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Love ’em or hate ’em, notches are quickly making their way to nearly every Android phone. What the iPhone X started (yes, we know the Essential Phone came before it) is now spreading to phones from ASUS, OnePlus, Huawei, and more.

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[Update: Post deleted] LG wants to know how you really feel about displays with notches was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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iOS now informs you when it wants your personal data

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In iOS 11.3 (and macOS 10.13.5), Apple has introduced a new data and privacy feature where users can get a better understanding of how their data is used. Now whenever Apple asks for access to information to enable certain features or experiences, a…
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A man who once tried to marry his laptop now wants to pull the plug on internet porn

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND


After being denied the right to marry his laptop not once but three times, an army veteran has a new target for in sight: internet porn. Chris Sevier’s putting personal pleasure aside — an admittedly challenging endeavor, given his history — and throwing his admittedly laughable reputation behind lobbying for legislation that would tax internet users for viewing porn on connected devices. The Electronic Frontier Foundation tracked comparable proposals across the country, revealing we could see about two dozen similar bills in 18 state legislatures this year. So far, none have passed. Each is slightly different, but offers the same…

This story continues at The Next Web
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Apple Wants to Add Force Touch to Your iPhone’s Volume Buttons

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The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office recently published a string of new Apple patent applications. The latest patent covers the company’s invention of new “force sensitive” buttons, including rocker switches, designed for a future generation of mobile devices like iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch and more. Apple patent No. 20180083620 covers the company’s invention of a […]
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Apple Wants to Launch 13 New Emojis for People with Disabilities

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Apple is thought to be working on a string of new emojis for disabled people, according to a report from the BBC. The firm is allegedly preparing to launch new emojis representing people with disabilities, including a guide dog, a person in a wheelchair and a prosthetic limb. At the moment, Apple said there is […]
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FCC wants to stop spending on gear from companies that ‘pose a national security threat’

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The U.S. maneuvers against China’s tech giants continue today with an official announcement from FCC Chairman Ajit Pai that the agency may soon ban purchasing anything from companies that “pose a national security threat.” Huawei, ZTE and other major tech manufacturers aren’t named specifically, but it’s clear what is meant.

Pai lists the risk of backdoored routers, switches and other telecoms equipment as the primary threat; Huawei and ZTE have been accused of doing this for years, though hard evidence has been scarce.

The proposal would prohibit any money from the FCC’s $ 8.5 billion Universal Service Fund, used for all kinds of projects and grants, to be spent on companies beholden to “hostile governments.” Pai mentioned the two Chinese giants in a previous letter describing the proposed plan.

Both companies in question have strenuously denied the charges; perhaps most publicly by Richard Yu, CEO of the company’s consumer business group, at CES this year.

But warnings from U.S. intelligence services have been ongoing since 2012, and Congress is considering banning Huawei equipment from use by government entities, saying the company “is effectively an arm of the Chinese government.”

Strong ties between these major companies and the Chinese government are hard to deny, of course, given China’s particularly hands-on methods in this sort of thing. Ironically, however, it seems that our spy agencies are so sure about this in great part because they themselves have pushed for and occasionally accomplished the same compromises of network infrastructure. If they’ve done it, they can be sure their Chinese rivals have.

The specifics of the rule are unknown, but even a relatively lax ban would likely be a big hit to Huawei and ZTE, which so far have failed to make a dent in the U.S. phone market but still manufacture all kinds of other telecommunications gear making up our infrastructure.

The draft of the new rule will be published tomorrow; the other commissioners have it now and are no doubt reading and forming their own opinions on how to improve it. The vote is set for April 17.

Mobile – TechCrunch

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