NASA to release Voyager Golden Record as a vinyl box set

Speaking as a space-loving child of the '70s and a music fan, it was hard to contain my excitement when NASA took to Kickstarter to fund a pressing of the space agency's Voyager Golden Records. Sent into space in 1977, the Golden Record contained sou…
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Sainsbury’s bets on the vinyl revival with its own record label

Helped by big-name retailers HMV, Tesco and Sainsbury's, vinyl records have seen a big revival in the UK. Based on Official Charts Company data, over 3.2 million vinyls were purchased last year alone, reaching heights not seen since 1991. It's a tren…
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UMG’s vinyl recommendation and delivery service launches in the US

The Sound of Vinyl, a record store and delivery service created by Universal Music Group, is now available in the US. The service, which has been available in the UK and Australia for a couple years, features over 20,000 titles from every major label as well as indies.

As part of its US launch, the Sound of Vinyl is debuting a pretty ingenious discovery and delivery service that will give incumbent online record stores like Discogs a run for their money.

The setup is pretty simple: when you give Sound of Vinyl your mobile number, it will text you with a “taste profile” quiz to determine what kind of records you enjoy. Once completed, the service will send you daily texts with album recommendations, complete with artwork and pricing….

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Over 50,000 digitized pieces of vinyl can now be listened to on Internet Archive

New York’s ARChive of Contemporary Music (ARC) has been preserving audiovisual materials since 1985, and a little over a year ago, it partnered with the Internet Archive to bring its Great 78 Project to the public. Along with audiovisual digitization vendor George Blood L.P. and additional volunteers, the Great 78 Project to date has put over 50,000 digitized 78rpm discs and cylinder recordings on the Internet Archive, which can be listened to in all their crackling glory.

An ongoing project, the Internet Archive actually has over 200,000 donated physical recordings, most of which are from the 1950s and earlier. These early recordings were made from shellac, not the resin that records are made with today. A brittle material, shellac…

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