Compared: 2018 iPad versus the original 12.9-inch and 9.7-inch iPad Pro

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

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The newest iPad can easily be considered as a low-cost alternative to the current generation of iPad Pro devices, but a comparison with the original iPad Pro models suggests Apple’s latest release has a lot in common with the earlier tablets. AppleInsider looks at the numbers to see how close they really are.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Apple Music almost doubles new Weeknd song streams versus Spotify

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

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The new EP by pop/R&B singer The Weeknd managed over 26 million streams within 24 hours on Apple Music, Apple said on Tuesday, some 6 million of those belonging to the song "Call Out My Name."
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Compared: 2018 iPad shows how far Apple has progressed versus the original iPad in eight years

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

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The latest installment of AppleInsider’s comparisons between the latest iPad release and others in the product range takes a look at the earliest releases, showing how far Apple’s tablet has progressed in just eight years since the first shipment of the original iPad on April 3, 2010, while still retaining the same overall appearance as its predecessors.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Compared: 2018 iPad cost efficiency versus iPad Pro features and speed

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

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The addition of Apple Pencil support to the sixth-generation iPad makes the tablet a considerably cheaper option for those needing to use a pressure-sensitive stylus when compared to the iPad Pro range, but there are more differences that need consideration. AppleInsider pits the new iPad against the current 12.9-inch and 10.5-inch iPad Pro models to show what else the extra cost offers consumers.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Compared: the new 2018 sixth generation iPad with Apple Pencil support versus the 2017 iPad and iPad Air 2

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

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The launch of a new iPad is usually followed by users deciding whether they should update to the latest model, or to continue using their existing iPad and save money. AppleInsider compares the new 2018 iPad against last year’s release and the iPad Air models to decide if it’s worth making the upgrade.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Video: Animoji on the iPhone X versus AR Emoji on the Galaxy S9 Plus

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

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Apple and Samsung both have hardware for facial recognition of users that are being used for animoji — and AppleInsider compares the two systems.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Going public pits Spotify’s suggestions versus everyone

The Best Guide To Selling Your Old Phones With High Profit

 The secret to Spotify’s public market debut is actually an acquisition it made in 2014. The Echo Nest was powering music recommendations for Beats Music, Rdio, Vevo and iHeartRadio before Spotify pulled it out from under them by buying it for a reported $ 100 million — 90 percent in Spotify equity. That deal paid off big time. Read More
Mobile – TechCrunch

The next front in the net neutrality war: Feds versus the states

States like Washington and New York are gearing up to fight the FCC’s recent repeal

The United States is about to go to war with itself over net neutrality.

In the hours after the Trump administration scrapped rules that required internet providers to treat all web traffic equally, a handful of states mobilized in a bid to reverse the decision by the Federal Communications Commission in court — or perhaps write their own new regulations as a replacement.

To start, a coalition of state attorneys general, led by New York, pledged on Thursday that they would sue the FCC to stop its rollback from taking place. Meanwhile, policymakers in at least two states — California and Washington — said they’d try on their own to prevent companies like AT&T, Charter, Comcast* and Verizon from blocking websites, slowing down web traffic or prioritizing their movies, music and other content above their rivals’ offerings.

Legislating is an especially fraught, difficult proposition. The order adopted by the FCC on Thursday doesn’t just kill the existing net neutrality rules — it explicitly seeks to override local policymakers from pursuing their own laws. And the FCC’s Republicans on Thursday signaled that they’d vigorously pursue any states that tried that anyway.

“I hope that most states and localities will not waste time and resources attempting to push the boundaries, but I realize that some will do so regardless,” said commissioner Michael O’Rielly before he and his colleagues voted on the repeal.

“I expect the agency to be vigilant in identifying and pursuing these cases,” O’Rielly said. “I also commit to work closely with [agency leadership] to help quash any conflicts that arise.”

Maybe none of these state-driven efforts will succeed — but it still suggests the divisive nature of the FCC’s new decision, voted along party lines, to undo one of the signature accomplishments of the Obama administration.

In 2015, the FCC under Democratic stewardship advanced rules that treated telecom giants not unlike utilities, aiming to stop them from meddling with the web. The rules also prohibited internet service providers from charging tech companies or others for faster delivery of their music, movies or other content — “fast lanes,” as critics have derided them.

On Thursday, though, the Republican-led FCC laid waste to those rules. Now, the door is open for broadband giants to pursue these so-called paid prioritization arrangements if they choose. And in place of the Obama administration’s net neutrality protections, the FCC under Trump is going to only require the likes of AT&T and Verizon to be transparent about their network practices. Another federal agency — one seen by critics as weaker — will police those companies’ net neutrality promises.

The complete, unabashed reversal is bound to touch off a series of court challenges from tech giants and consumer advocates. Groups that represent Amazon, Facebook, Google and others have already said they’re weighing their options, as have activists, who feel the FCC didn’t listen to the millions of Americans who urged the agency to keep its net neutrality rules in place. And among the lot of early challengers are state attorneys general, led by New York’s Eric T. Schneiderman, who sharply criticized FCC Chairman Ajit Pai for proceeding amid robust opposition.

“New Yorkers deserve the right to a free and open Internet. That’s why we will sue to stop the FCC’s illegal rollback of net neutrality,” Schneiderman said on Thursday. He did not detail his full list of allies, but a total of 19 states previously urged the FCC to stand down on its repeal.

Schneiderman particularly has spent months probing the roughly 21 million comments that the FCC received about net neutrality. In recent weeks, he’s concluded that many of the submissions are fake — using names sometimes without the named individuals’ knowledge. So Schneiderman and other Democrats previously pressed the FCC to delay its vote, but Pai refused to relent or even aid in the state’s investigation.

Meanwhile, other local policymakers are forging ahead with their own plans. In California, for example, a state senator on Thursday pledged to introduce legislation and “step in and ensure open internet access in California.”

And in Washington state, Democratic leader Gov. Jay Inslee has sought to push the local utilities regulator to require that internet providers certify they aren’t blocking, throttling or otherwise interfering with web traffic.

In the end, some efforts in California, Washington or elsewhere are perhaps limited by the FCC’s order. And this sort of federal blockade on state regulation isn’t new or really even that rare. It will eventually be challenged in court by foes — local regulators, tech giants and activists — who believe the FCC overstepped its bounds.

At most, though, the state-led efforts Thursday could spell the eventual undoing of the Trump administration’s attempt to repeal net neutrality rules. And, at least, it serves to highlight the deep rifts between policymakers around the country over how to regulate the web.

Whatever the outcome, the fight is just beginning. “This is not just an attack on the future of our internet,” said Schneiderman, the attorney general of New York. “It’s an attack on all New Yorkers, and on the integrity of every American’s voice in government — and we will fight back.”

* Comcast, through its NBCU arm, is an investor in Vox Media, which owns this website.


Recode – All

With Snapchat’s new redesign, the company is betting that users want intimacy versus popularity

Its simplified new app looks slicker, but Snap’s longtime focus on personal relationships isn’t going to change.

Snapchat unveiled its much anticipated new redesign today, a change that CEO Evan Spiegel said was necessary after the company acknowledged that its app was too hard for many people to use.

But it’s still not the drastic change that many expected. While Snap is most definitely changing the app’s look and feel to make it simpler and more sleek — such as where you find Stories posted by your friends — it isn’t changing that much in the way of functionality, like how you capture or share a video message.

What is clear is that Snapchat’s redesign means the company has decided to double down on intimacy, the idea that has been at its heart from the start. That is: Snapchat is first and foremost a service for private communication between friends and family, and not a place a place to opine on Donald Trump’s most recent tweetstorm or broadcast photos from your family vacation for everyone to see.

This has been Snap’s identity from the beginning, and, until recently, it’s worked pretty well. So much so that Facebook’s Instagram shifted its own philosophy on user sharing 18 months ago to mimic (some say copy) Snap’s low-pressure philosophy.

The question is: Is focusing on more intimate personal relationships going to work for Snap as a publicly traded company, because it suggests a smaller, although potentially more engaged, audience?

Let’s start with the redesign, which include a number of changes (and non-changes). Two notable ones that reinforce the company’s approach to relationships:

  1. Snapchat didn’t make it any easier for users to find and follow new friends. This has always been, in my opinion, a major obstacle to scaling the app, which is a problem when you’re a publicly traded advertising company. Unlike Facebook, Snap doesn’t bombard users with friend suggestions every time they open the app and seems totally content with users having a smaller number of connections, even if that means fewer total users.
  2. Snapchat eliminated the Stories page inside the app, a section where user posts co-mingled with posts from publishers like NBC or Bleacher Report. Instead, Snap is putting all user posts and messages in one section of the app and leaving all publisher content in a separate section. The idea, according to Snap, is to help lower the bar for what is considered post-worthy, so that people don’t feel the social pressure that might come with posting to a wide network of people.

Those decisions are meant to reinforce Snap’s identity as a place to connect meaningfully with your friends and family, not a place where you need to keep up with the Joneses.

Snapchat said as much on its blog explaining the changes:

Until now, social media has always mixed photos and videos from your friends with content from publishers and creators. While blurring the lines between professional content creators and your friends has been an interesting Internet experiment, it has also produced some strange side-effects (like fake news) and made us feel like we have to perform for our friends rather than just express ourselves. The new Snapchat separates the social from the media.

But it’s not clear that the redesign actually addresses the “hard to use” problem that Spiegel alluded to earlier this month.

It doesn’t change the way people actually record or share posts. It doesn’t change how difficult it is to find or understand Snapchat features, such as face filters or Snap streaks. And while the redesign makes Snapchat more visually appealing — and perhaps that will make it easier to understand for new users — it’s unclear if any of these changes will make it easier to use.

It’s no secret that Snap has struggled since the company went public in early March. User growth has slowed considerably since last summer, and Snap’s business continues to disappoint investors.

Now Snap is betting on a strategy that hasn’t correlated to steady user growth in the way we’ve seen from other network-driven apps like Facebook and Facebook-owned Instagram. At the end of the day, Snapchat is an advertising business, and advertising businesses rely on scale. The idea of a more intimate social experience is laudable, and it offers an alternative to Facebook, but it may not provide the kind of growth investors expect for a social networking app.

Or maybe it will as users become inundated and overwhelmed by a social media environment — primarily on Facebook, but also on Twitter — that has become bloated, noisy, and at times, toxic.

Snapchat has attracted loyal fans — including young people — because it’s different, and the innovative Spiegel is better than almost everyone at giving users unique products and features. And it’s true that this app design is a definite improvement.

That said, it still might not be the solution to Snap’s problems.


Recode – All

Video: Apple iPhone X versus Samsung Galaxy Note 8 benchmark comparison

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The consumer wars between Apple and Samsung will go on as long as both companies are around, as will the debates around which flagship device is more powerful. AppleInsider gets both the iPhone X and the Galaxy Note 8 on our test bench, and put them both through their paces.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News