Why Sports Illustrated Is on the Right Track by Integrating AR

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

The following is a guest contributed post from Tom Farrell, the vice president of marketing for the mobile marketing and consumer engagement platform Swrve.

Augmented reality (AR) is hardly news by this point. The Pokémon Go craze has been and gone, and if you haven’t taken a selfie with the Snapchat AR flower crown, what on Earth have you been doing? As all tech trends eventually do, AR has come to the point where its sheer newness is no longer enough to get people hyped up. As a result, in order to become more than just another futuristic gimmick, AR needs to be integrated into users’ daily lives in a way that is useful; it must enhance their experiences rather than just being used for software showboating. In particular, AR opens up interesting new monetization opportunities for publishers.

One of the most extensive recent examples of just how many options AR can offer comes from Sports Illustrated, which has introduced several AR and virtual reality (VR) features as part of its famous swimsuit issue. There interactive spread includes a 360-degree VR tour of the photo shoot; Snapchat lenses that use AR to turn the reader into one of the models; AR-activated pages that readers can scan to bring to life; 3D holograms; and more. What makes Sports Illustrated’s AR application particularly notable beyond the sheer number of different features is the way that these integrate into the print and web editions, becoming part of the publication rather than replacing it.

These features are likely to drive revenue in two main ways, with the first (and most obvious) being by boosting the amount of time that people are engaged. In the same way that most of us are likely to spend longer playing a video game than looking at the cover of its box, creating actions that the audience can carry out and ways that they can interact with the material mean that they’re likely to spend more time engaging with the issue’s content.

Second, the AR features require readers download the LifeVR app, which increases the number of engagement channels, as well. By incentivizing engagement with the app through an exclusive experience, acquisition is more likely to be encouraged than by any amount of “download now!” messaging. In fact, to get the most from these AR and VR experiences, readers are encouraged to engage with the print magazine, website and app, tripling the reader’s total contact with the brand. These added features offer a way to revitalize the print medium, bringing readers of the magazine into the app, and users of the app back to the magazine. Having the app on readers’ phones means that they’re more likely to engage with the brand in the future. Because the LifeVR app features several publications from the Life brand, it’s also an opportunity to cross-sell users on to other titles, too.

For publishers, increased brand engagement time is particularly crucial since apps are a prime platform for monetization. If a publisher’s content is monetized by upselling readers to subscriptions or premium packages, then using the app to deliver these interactions means that the publisher’s approach can be much more targeted and much more effective. If monetization relies instead on showing advertisements from other businesses, these, too, can be optimized through the app by timing them to cause the least disruption and, therefore, to support maximum customer retention. With ad blockers becoming increasingly common, the ability to have full control over the ads shown through apps is particularly valuable. Essentially, having more readers spending more time in the app translates to more advertising revenue, and Sports Illustrated’s use of AR features is a great way to do just that.

Sports Illustrated is on to a winner here. Readers get a more dynamic experience that they’ll want to share and spend time engaging with, and publishers increase brand exposure, which can increase revenue. We predict AR will be an area of growth over the coming months, as applications like Sports Illustrated prove to bring real benefits beyond its original clickbait appeal.

The post Why Sports Illustrated Is on the Right Track by Integrating AR appeared first on Mobile Marketing Watch.


Mobile Marketing Watch

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Fitbit Ionic long-term review: Fitbit may be on track for a wearable win

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

I reviewed the Fitbit Ionic when it launched late last year, and at the time I didn’t much care for it. I was not into the design, and there were multiple software issues. I’ve continued to wear the watch on and off since then, and I spent about a week with the Fitbit Versa just recently. The Ionic has gotten several updates since my original review, including the recent bump to FitbitOS 2.0 that matches what ships on the Versa. With Google’s Wear OS still on a downward trajectory, I’m giving Fitbit’s flagship smartwatch another shot.

Read More

Fitbit Ionic long-term review: Fitbit may be on track for a wearable win was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Android Police – Android news, reviews, apps, games, phones, tablets

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

FUELlink uses IoT to track fuel efficiency of bio-gas buses

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

vinie - Fuellink use the iot to track nottingham buses

NEWSBYTE: Scottish fuel management company FUELlink has secured a deal with Nottingham City Transport to install smart data collection devices on the city’s new fleet of bio-gas buses.

FUELlink’s IoT fuel-tracking device, named ‘VINIE’, sits on the dashboard and allows fleet managers keep track of and analyse data picked up from the vehicle’s engine management computer. Operators can set miles per gallon targets, view the amount of hours worked per litre, and detect fuel leaks.

The device was developed with support from the CENSIS IoT Centre, one of eight innovation centres funded by the Scottish Funding Council.

Read more: Transport companies lack skills to get the most out of IoT data

Fleet management for city transport

FUELlink expects to see its VINIE devices gain traction in the coming months, particularly as the benefits become clear to transport operators that are keen to retrofit old vehicles and build more efficient fleets.

John Ashley, director at FUELlink Systems, notes the importance of support from CENSIS in reaching this point. “The way we’ve grown as a business is by listening to our customers and developing products which help them run their companies more efficiently,” he said.

“Working with transport operators, we recognised some of the pitfalls and challenges facing them on a daily basis. And while we had a concept to address some of those challenges, it was by teaming up with CENSIS that we were able to develop VINIE.”

Read more: Transport Scotland turns to IoT to keep roads clear this winter

He continued, “by demonstrating the proof of concept, we could pilot the product with a number of companies, showcasing the benefits of the device, and have since landed significant contracts, including Nottingham City Transport.

“At the moment, we’re focused on introducing the product to local authorities, bus operators, and haulage firms, but in the future, we hope to diversify and allow companies across industries to take advantage of VINIE’s versatile data monitoring and storage capabilities.”

Internet of Business says

Fuel and energy efficiency is emerging as an important hotspot in IoT programmes, not just in transportation and the supply chain, but also in starting new relationships between utilities and energy companies and their business and domestic customers.

We applaud any new programme that seeks to make public transport smarter and more efficient, and city centre traffic more environmentally friendly and sustainable.

Read more: Smart energy: Why vehicle-to-grid technology is on the move

Read more: WaveRoller energy: Why the sea is the world’s biggest battery

Read more: IoT helps wind power match conventional fuels, says report

Read more: Pirelli smart tyres underpin its Cyber Car strategy

The post FUELlink uses IoT to track fuel efficiency of bio-gas buses appeared first on Internet of Business.

Internet of Business

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

The Chinese Space Station Has Crashed in the Pacific. Why Was It So Hard to Track?

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

If a massive space station falls out of the atmosphere into the Pacific Ocean, with no one there to witness it, does it make a sound?

That’s no hypothetical question. We’re asking about Tiangong-1, the Chinese space station that finally “de-orbited” from space and into the Pacific around 8 PM Eastern time on April 1.

Let’s be honest — “de-orbited” is a polite way of saying “free-fall.” Scientists could neither alter nor even really track Tiangong-1’s descent. That could be a problem in a future — an atmosphere more packed with spacecraft presents a (slightly) higher risk for humans on the ground.

We’ve anticipated Tiangong-1’s homecoming since 2016, when abnormalities in the space station’s orbit suggested that the Chinese space agency had lost control of it. It took a few months for authorities to admit that the craft was out of their reach. Normally, a space agency will retire a satellite by purposely guiding it into the atmosphere, at an angle and speed such that it burns up completely or re-enters Earth’s atmosphere far from human populations.

That makes Tiangong-1’s spinning, erratic descent less than ideal.

Scientists weren’t exactly sure when and where the craft would land until the moment it did so. Indeed, the space station’s case highlights the fact that scientists still don’t have the capacity to wrangle the significant number of variables that factor into tracking and modeling such situations.

Around noon Eastern time on April 1, seven hours before the craft actually fell, the European Space Agency (ESA) had reached the limit of what it could forecast. And there still a pretty big window for when and where the station would re-enter.

“With our current understanding of the dynamics of the upper atmosphere and Europe’s limited sensors, we are not able to make very precise predictions,” said Holger Krag, head of ESA’s Space Debris Office, in an agency blog about Tiangong-1.

Note: we do not want to overstate the odds of being hit by falling spacecraft. Space junk falls out of the atmosphere all the time, and only one person has ever been hit by it. For the Tiangong-1, the odds that the falling space station would have hit any single human on Earth were still 1 in 1 trillion, lower than your yearly odds of being struck by lightning.

But that may change in the coming years. The growing space industry has promised to put a number of new spacecraft into orbit around Earth in the next decade, including thousands of new satellites. As we increase the number of objects in space, the overall probability of something falling out of the sky into a populated area will increase. At the moment, nobody has a way to zap space junk (or incoming meteors, for that matter) that might pose a threat, and it doesn’t seem likely that we’ll get one anytime soon.

Instead, as ESA’s Krag implies, research could help a lot. If we could better understand how the upper atmosphere behaves, we could better model where a falling object would land, and potentially warn people in the area if needed.

Unfortunately, that doesn’t seem likely. The sort of basic research that would improve scientists’ understanding of the atmosphere is chronically under-funded, and in the U.S., happens in agencies to which the White House doesn’t allocate many resources.

Basic research into the upper atmosphere isn’t nearly as sexy as as falling space junk, but it could one day save a lot of people some logistical — and potentially physical — headaches.

The post The Chinese Space Station Has Crashed in the Pacific. Why Was It So Hard to Track? appeared first on Futurism.

Futurism

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Cloudflare makes it harder for ISPs to track your web history

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

If you're privacy-minded, you probably aren't thrilled that governments seem hell-bent on giving internet providers free rein over your browsing data. Cloudflare just gave you a tool to fight back, however. It launched 1.1.1.1, a free Domain Name S…
Engadget RSS Feed
Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Apple Services on Track to Overtake iPhone as Primary Revenue Driver

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Apple has been all about the iPhone since it launched the now-ubiquitous flagship. Going forward, however, that may no longer be the case. In fact, the Cupertino tech giant’s services revenue is rapidly growing. At this point, it’s on track to overtake Apple’s flagship iPhone as the firm’s primary driver of revenue, Morgan Stanley Managing […]
Read More…
iDrop News
Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

GDC 2018: ‘Safari Central’ Uses Real-World Data to Put Safari Animals in Your World to Track in AR

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Internet of Elephants is a development studio based out of Kenya who focuses on making digital experiences that help people learn about and make connections with animals in hopes of raising awareness about animal conservation. In August of last year they released the app Safari Central [Free] which allows users to interact with a handful of protected safari animals in augmented reality and do things like take photos or learn more about them. It’s definitely an “app” and not a “game” but that’s where GDC 2018 comes in. We met up with Internet of Elephants to see their future plans for Safari Central, which right now is considered just a limited preview. The real goal is to create an almost Pokemon GO-like tracking experience through AR. What’s really cool is that the studio has many partners in Kenya who are able to provide real-life data on all the featured animals, and coupled with the impressively animated 3D models it really has the potential to bring real awareness and knowledge to people who use Safari Central. You can find much more information about Safari Central and Internet of Elephants at their official website, and you can see a brief demo of the new AR mode in the video below. It’s in a VERY early state right now but already looks really cool. And of course if you want to check out the limited preview version of Safari Central, you can do so with the link at the end of this article.

TouchArcade

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Switzerland Is Developing a System to Track Drones All Over the Country

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Drone Country

Residents of Switzerland should be prepared to see more drones in the sky, as the country begins to move forward with plans to integrated unmanned drones into their air traffic management systems. The system will track drones and register operators in order to make airspace safer for the tiny vehicles.

Ars Technica reports that Skyguide, a Swiss air traffic control operator, is partnering with AirMap, maker of one of the leading global airspace management platforms for drones. In June, Skyguide will begin migrating its data and air traffic management applications to AirMap’s airspace mapping platform, AirMap UTM.

The effort is a smaller part of a larger initiative known as U-Space, which aims to promote safe and secure access to European airspace for millions of drones and their operators. Alongside the partnership between Skyguide and AirMap, the U-Space first phase will include the development of services that will register and ID drones and operators, as well as implement geofencing restrictions — meaning the airspace around and above specific buildings and locations will be inaccessible to drones.

“With Swiss U-space, Switzerland aims to safely open the skies for drone commerce,” said Ben Marcus, CEO of AirMap, in a press statement. “We’re proud to work with Skyguide to bring AirMap UTM to Switzerland and make it possible for more pilots, more drones, and more missions to take flight in Europe.”

Incorporating drones into new business models is also one of U-Space’s goals, but an effective management system is required first.

The completed air traffic management system will be the first phase in the national rollout of U-Space. This system has been compared to the United States’ NASA-designed Unmanned Aircraft System Traffic Management, which is also meant to enable the use of low-altitude airspace, be it for drones or other small aircraft like flying cars.

Bring Out the Drones

Since it’s still a long way from being fully implemented and accounting for every drone in Switzerland, Ars Technica writes the system is essentially being used for “automated flight authorization and cataloging for drones” right now.

The rest of U-Space is scheduled to roll out in four phases between 2018 and 2021. Phase 2 will implement flight planning, flight approval, and tracking, among other things. Phases 3 and 4 will add more complex flight operations like “assistance for conflict detection” and improved autonomy for both drones and the U-Space management system.

It’s unclear how many drones and operators will participate in U-Space, though. According to Ars Technica, many drone operators in Switzerland are hobbyists, and as such, may ignore U-Space’s developments. There’s also concerns about the potential increase in cost and regulation if drone flights are commercialized, which could phase out those same hobbyists.

If Switzerland is capable of implementing such a system over its nearly 16,000 square miles of territory, that could help initiate safer use of drones all over the world. After all, as more drones are recruited for various purposes, it’s clear they’ll soon become an integral part of society.

The post Switzerland Is Developing a System to Track Drones All Over the Country appeared first on Futurism.

Futurism

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Android P feature spotlight: You can now easily track which apps recently sent notifications

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

You probably get a lot of notifications on your phone. So many, in fact, it’s easy to forget which apps were in that batch you just dismissed. Android P includes a handy menu that tracks recent notifications so you can disallow an app that’s been pestering you in just a few taps.

Of course, Android has long been keeping track of notifications in the hidden log menu. There are some apps that pull data from this menu, but it’s not exposed to users in the settings.

Read More

Android P feature spotlight: You can now easily track which apps recently sent notifications was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Android Police – Android news, reviews, apps, games, phones, tablets

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

How to track flights in the Mac’s Notification Center

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

TodayFlights adds a flight-tracker widget to your Mac’s Today View sidebar, making it quick and easy to keep an eye on incoming friends and family.

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)

Cult of Mac

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app