Third watchOS 4.3 developer beta available alongside iOS 11.3 and macOS 10.13.4 public test versions

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Apple has issued the third developer’s beta test version of watchOS 4.3, and has released public beta test versions of iOS 11.3, and macOS High Sierra 10.13.4.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Flipkart Billion Capture+ Battery Life Test – #OneChargeRating

Flipkart launched its mid-range  Billion Capture+ smartphone as a part of its Billion brand recently. We already brought you the review of the phone, here we have the battery life test results of the phone. It packs a 3,500mAh built-in battery, has a 5.5-inch 1080p display, is powered by Octa-Core Snapdragon 625, has up to 4GB of RAM and runs on Android 7.1.2 (Nougat). Check out the test results below. Talk Time It lasted for 33 hours and 34 minutes in our talk time test. 3G Browsing It lasted for 7 hours and 49 minutes in our 3G browsing test. WiFi Browsing It lasted 10 hours and 6 minutes in our WiFi Browsing test. Video Playback It lasted for 14 hours and 16 minutes in our video playback test. Charging Time It took 1 hour 48 minutes for charging it from 0 to 100% since it has support for fast charging, and it took about 39 minutes to charge it from 0 to 50%. Standby Time It lasted for 53 days in our standby test. In achieved a One Charge Rating of 16 hours and 45 minutes, which is good for a phone with a 3,500mAh battery. Check out our battery life test procedure, to know more about our tests in detail.
Fone Arena

Apple ‘didn’t test the HomePod enough,’ design experts claim

HomePod Rings vs Sonos One

The HomePod, a $ 349 smart speaker that signaled Apple’s opening salvo in the war against Amazon Echo and Google Home, is off to a bad start. Despite reviews that stressed fantastic sound from such a small speaker, the HomePod failed to sell out, likely hurt by a poor voice assistant and a lack of standard features like multi-room pairing.

To make bad things even worse, it was revealed last week that the speaker can leave a white ring on some wooden surfaces. Apple tried to downplay the issue, saying that it’s ‘not unusual‘ for a speaker to do that, but by that point, the ‘Ring of doom’ narrative was already too strong.

 

Apple’s statement made it seem like nothing was out of the ordinary. “It is not unusual for any speaker with a vibration-dampening silicone base to leave mild marks when placed on some wooden surfaces,” the company said in an updated support article for the HomePod. “The marks can be caused by oils diffusing between the silicone base and the table surface, and will often go away after several days when the speaker is removed from the wooden surface. If not, wiping the surface gently with a soft damp or dry cloth may remove the marks. If marks persist, clean the surface with the furniture manufacturer’s recommended cleaning process. If you’re concerned about this, we recommend placing your HomePod on a different surface.”

But according to industrial design specialists contacted by Business Insider, the problem was indeed “unusual,” and a lack of attention to detail was the culprit:

“I’m actually very surprised,” said Cesar Viramontes, a Senior Industrial Designer at Y Studios, a San Francisco based firm that has worked on everything from TV set top boxes to digital picture frames. Viramontes, who has worked on numerous speakers in the past, said it’s not an issue he’s encountered before.

“They didn’t test the product enough and in the right variety of circumstances, especially considering that a wood surface is a very likely support for the product,” said Ignazio Moresco, a product design expert who has worked at frog design, Microsoft and Ericsson.

“They should have caught the issue if they followed a rigorous QA process,” he said, referring to the quality assurance process that hardware makers put new products through to ensure that they are consumer-ready.

That’s the bad news. The good news is that it might be an easy fix:

Apple may need to “re-tool” the manufacturing process since silicone is manufactured using a different process than the other kinds of elastomer,” said Berkowitz. If that’s necessary, the process could take anywhere from two weeks to six weeks, he noted.

“It’s an issue, but I think it’s probably going to be one that’ll be corrected in the next round of manufacturing,” said Y Studios’ Viramontes. “I think it will be a minor issue, and people will probably forget about it in the next couple of months when it goes away.”

At this point, the damage is likely done for Apple. Anyone who already owns a HomePod (or is thinking about buying one) will use a coaster, regardless of whether or not Apple “fixes” the problem. The stains from the HomePod were never really the problem — it’s a simple issue to work around, even for the small number of customers affected — but it’s the fact that Apple seemingly didn’t know about the problem that made it embarrassing.

Apple – BGR

Honor 7X Battery Life Test – #OneChargeRating

Huawei’s Honor brand launched its mid-range Honor 7X smartphone in India recently. We already brought you the review of the phone, here we have the battery life test results of the phone. It packs a 3340mAh battery (typical) / 3240mAh (minimum), has a 5.93-inch Full HD+  display, is powered by Octa-Core Kirin 659 SoC, has 4GB of RAM and runs on Android 7.0 (Nougat) with EMUI 5.1. Check out the test results below. Talk Time It lasted for 33 hours and 36 minutes in our talk time test. 3G Browsing It lasted for 7 hours and 16 minutes in our 3G browsing test. WiFi Browsing It lasted 9 hours and 7 minutes in our WiFi Browsing test. Video Playback It lasted only for 8 hours and 28 minutes in our video playback test. Charging Time It took 2 hours 23 mins for charging it from 0 to 100% since it doesn’t have fast charging, and 0 to 50% takes about an hour. Standby Time It lasted for 54 days in our standby test. In achieved a One Charge Rating of 14 hours and 46 minutes, mainly due to brilliant talk time results. Check out our battery life test procedure, to know more about our tests in detail.
Fone Arena

Researchers Have Developed a Potential Blood Test for Autism

First of Their Kind

Researchers at the University of Warwick have developed two tests that could potentially detect autism in children. Both tests, one blood, and one urine are based on a previously discovered link between damage to proteins in blood plasma and autism. The team believes the tests to be the first of their kind, and hope that they could help improve early detection of autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

The study, published in the journal Molecular Autism, confirmed previous research that had linked certain mutations in amino acid transporters with ASD. Since proteins in blood plasma can be damaged by two processes, oxidation and glycation, and the researchers developed tests that can detect that damage.

Armed with this knowledge and using the most reliable of the tests they developed, the team took urine and blood samples from 38 children with ASD, as well as a control group of 31 children who had not been diagnosed with ASD. With the help of an artificial intelligence (AI)-developed algorithm, the team figured out how the two groups were chemically different.

“With further testing we may reveal specific plasma and urinary profiles or “fingerprints” of compounds with damaging modifications,”, Reader of Experimental Systems Biology at the University of Warwick and the research team’s lead. “This may help us improve the diagnosis of ASD and point the way to new causes of ASD.”

Researchers still do not completely understand why people develop autism. About 30-35% of cases of ASD are linked to genetic variants, but there is no exact formula for predicting autism. As with many other conditions, genetics, environment, and other factors all play a role. In recent years, there’s even been evidence proposed that gut bacteria could indicate whether or not a person has an ASD.

Finding biomarkers for ASD wouldn’t be far off what the team from Warwick has accomplished, as their research demonstrated that measuring protein damage could be a reliable indicator of whether or not a child has ASD.

“Our discovery could lead to earlier diagnosis and intervention,” said Rabbani, “We hope the tests will also reveal new causative factors.”

ASD cases are characterized by a wide variety of symptoms that can range from mild behavioral issues to debilitating compulsive behavior, anxiety, cognitive impairment, and much more. Because its symptoms are so varied and the causes aren’t yet fully understand, diagnosis and treatment can be an arduous journey.

If tests can be developed that allow families to receive a diagnosis sooner, it will give them the ability to seek intervention earlier, too. Which can be essential for helping kids with ASD, and their families, navigate the world and improve their quality of life.

The post Researchers Have Developed a Potential Blood Test for Autism appeared first on Futurism.

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