How to Stop Others from Adding/Removing Accessories or Scenes to Home App on iPhone and iPad

How to Stop Others to Add-Remove Accessories or Scenes to Home App on iPhone and iPad

Your naughty brother keeps on adding unnecessary scenes to the Home app; despite your repeated warning. Today, you have decided enough is enough and want to disallow him to add or remove accessories or scenes from the Home app on iPhone or iPad.

Stopping others from adding or deleting HomeKit accessories is quite simple and hardly takes a few steps. Let me show you how it works!

How to Stop Others to Add-Remove Accessories or Scenes to Home App on iPhone and iPad

How to Disallow Others to Add or Remove Accessories or Scenes to Home App on iPhone and iPad

Step #1. Launch the Home app on your iOS device → tap on the tiny arrow atHomePod Settings Arrow the top right corner.

Step #2. Now, select the person that you want to edit permissions for.

Step #3. Next, turn off the switch next to Allow Editing.

Going forward, this person won’t be able to edit accessories. But if you ever happen to change your mind and allow him to get onboard again, follow the same steps and turn on the switch in the end.

How to Remove A Person to Prevent Him/Her from Controlling Your HomeKit Accessories

You have already disallowed a person from editing accessories. Now, you want to remove him to completely block his path to return.

Step #1. Open the Home app on your iOS device.

Step #2. Now, tap on the tiny arrow HomePod Settings Arrowlocated at the upper right corner.

Step #3. Next, tap the user and then hit Remove Person.

That’s done!

Over to you

It’s pretty easy to manage the editing permissions, isn’t it? Share your thought in the comments.

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Windows Phone 7.5 and Windows Phone 8.0 devices will stop getting push notifications this week

Windows Phone 7.5 Mango review

It’s been awhile since Windows Phone 7.5 and Windows Phone 8.0 were in the spotlight, but some folks out there may still be relying on a WP7.5 or WP8.0 device to stay connected. Unfortunately, that’s about to become more difficult.

Microsoft has confirmed that it’s ending push notifications for Windows Phone 7.5 and Windows Phone 8.0. The push notifications services will be shut off tomorrow, February 20, 2018.

Once these services are switched off, Windows Phone 7.5 and Windows Phone 8.0 devices will no longer receive notifications. Live tile updates will stop coming in, too, and the “Find my phone” feature will no longer be able to locate your device.

Microsoft does say that push notifications on Windows Phone 8.1 devices will continue to work for now, and Windows 10 Mobile devices are unaffected.

While turning off notifications and live tiles won’t render Windows Phone 7.5 and Windows Phone 8.0 devices completely useless, their functionality will be significantly hobbled. The news is disappointing for anyone still using a WP7.5 or WP8.0 device, but Microsoft likely feels that it can’t keep these services going forever, especially since those devices were replaced by WP8.1 and W10M phones years ago.

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Apple’s most talented workers can’t stop walking into doors

Apple Park Glass Walls

Apple recently completed its brand-new headquarters in Cupertino, California. The giant UFO-shaped building — the most expensive building in the US — is sprawling glass-and-steel manifesto, a very physical manifestation of Apple’s ethos to always put design first. And, in the most Apple way possible, putting form over function is causing some problems.

According to Bloomberg, Apple employees keep walking into the glass panes and glass pods littering the building. Attempts to make things safer by putting Post-It notes on the most dangerous doors have been struck down by Apple leadership, since it interferes with the building’s design.

“Surrounding the Cupertino, California-based building are 45-foot tall curved panels of safety glass,” Bloomberg reports. “Inside are work spaces, dubbed “pods,” also made with a lot of glass. Apple staff are often glued to the iPhones they helped popularize. That’s resulted in repeated cases of distracted employees walking into the panes, according to people familiar with the incidents.”

Although Apple Park has received rave reviews from architects and Apple fans, this isn’t the first time we’ve heard that employees aren’t enamoured with their new office. Last year, John Gruber reported that Johny Srouji, the head of Apple’s silicon design team, didn’t like the layout either:

When he was shown the floor plans, he was more or less just ‘f*** that, f*** you, f*** this, this is bulls***.’ And they built his team their own building off to the side on the campus. So they’re not even in — not only are they not going along with the open floor plans, but Srouji’s team is in their own building. And maybe internally they’re saying it’s for security or that’s there’s a logical reason for it, but my understanding is that that building was built because Srouji was like, ‘f*** this, my team isn’t working like this.’

 There’s also been criticism that the open-plan design isn’t condusive to a good working environment for Apple’s software engineers, who need a simple environment with a lack of distractions to work well. Maybe that’s why Apple’s software has been problematic lately.

Apple – BGR