Tap Bio’s mini-sites solve Instagram’s profile link problem

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You only get one link on Instagram, but Tap Bio lets you point that to a customized landing page full of all the sites you want to share. Rather than constantly changing your Instagram profile URL, you can easily add slides equipped with links to your Tap Bio corresponding to your latest Instagram posts. Tap Bio could be a powerful tool for social media stars, digital entrepreneurs or anyone trying to market themselves via Instagram.

Tap Bio is About.me for the next generation. You can see it in action here.

It’s a deceptively simple idea, yet one that the big website-creation platforms like Squarespace, Wix and Weebly have missed. It’s dumbfounding that there’s no popular mobile-first site builder, though an app called Universe was one of the hottest companies that graduated from Y Combinator’s accelerator this month. But by starting with an obvious problem, the bootstrapped Tap Bio could gain a foothold in a business dominated by heavily funded startups, and angle to become the center of your online identity. People interested can sign up for the private beta here.

The whole reason for Tap Bio’s existence is a brilliant decision of Instagram’s. You can’t post links, and you get just one link in your profile. URLs in post captions don’t hyperlink and can’t be copied. That means the focus is on sharing beauty, not driving clicks. But promoters gonna promote, so the “Link in bio” trend began. Instagrammers change their profile link to where they want to send people, then mention that much-derided phrase hoping their followers will open their profile and click-through. Unfortunately, though, anyone reading one of their older posts might be confused when the “link in bio” has changed to point somewhere unrelated.

The fact that you can’t link from posts has contributed to the quality of the experience,” says Tap Bio CEO Jesse Engle. “But it’s created a major pain point for people who are promoting something, which is a lot of people.”

Engle is experienced with filling social platform gaps. He co-founded Twitter scheduling and multi-account management app CoTweet in 2008, which sold to ExactTarget in 2010 and eventually became part of Salesforce. Over the past few years, he and Tap Bio co-founder Ryan Walker, who just left Apple, have been running Link In Profile, a more basic but similar tool that just recreates your Instagram profile but with links attached to each post.

With Tap Bio, you set it as your Instagram profile link, and then create different cards to show on your mini-site. One can show two columns of your recent Instagram posts that instantly open whichever link you want to pair with each. Another offers a more visual full-screen profile with links to your other social media presences, like on Twitter and YouTube. There’s a focused, single-link call to action page if you’ve got one big thing to promote. And Tap Bio is adding more card styles.

Tap Bio is “forever free” if you only want one profile card and one of any other card; $ 5 per month gets you three extra plus analytics, while $ 12 per month grants unlimited cards across up to three Instagram accounts — though there are discounts for yearly billing. It will compete with traditional site builders and less-polished alternatives, like Linkin.bio and Linktree.

But the biggest risk for Tap Bio isn’t competition, it’s its host platform. Instagram could always shut down links out to Tap Bio. After all, it did just suddenly kill off a big part of its API three months ahead of schedule as part of Facebook’s big data privacy crackdown. Luckily, Engle says, “we’re mitigating this risk by building a close relationship with Instagram, openly sharing our plans and offering whatever value we can to them. They’ve been very helpful in sharing their plans, and we are confident that we’ll continue to play a role in this space well into the future.”

Tap Bio’s potential goes far beyond Instagram, though. It could become the hub for your web presence. About.me is outdated, Twitter’s too temporal, Facebook’s too personal, LinkedIn’s too formal and Instagram’s too informal. Unless you have your own full-fledged website, it’s unclear which one link your should give people you meet online or off. If Tap Bio plays it right, it could become your digital calling card.

Mobile – TechCrunch

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Apple Watch helps solve brutal murder

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

An Australian woman claims her mother-in-law was killed in their home by unknown assilants, but data from the victim’s Apple Watch contradicts that testimony. An Apple Watch tracks the wearer’s heartbeat. This means it knows exactly when that heart stops, allowing Adelaide police to know precisely when this murder had taken place. And that was […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)

Cult of Mac

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John Harrison’s super-accurate clock helped solve the longitude puzzle

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Today’s Google Doodle celebrates clockmaker John Harrison, whose efforts to calculate longitude helped people figure out their place in the world — literally.

Harrison was born 325 years ago in Yorkshire, England and grew up to become a clockmaker. Before he died in 1776, he developed a series of increasingly accurate clocks that could be used to determine a ship’s position on the globe’s east-west axis, also known as its longitude.

Seamen had long used the position of the sun or North Star in the sky to figure out latitude — that is, distance from the equator in the north-south direction, according to The Conversation. But calculating longitude was much trickier, leading to deadly navigational errors: in 1707, for example, a five-ship…

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Police are casting a wide net into the deep pool of Google user location data to solve crimes

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

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Raleigh, N.C., detectives have obtained warrants to search a wide variety of Google account data, and not necessarily only of suspects — a practice that has raised the ire of privacy advocates.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

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Apple Music Android app gets rare update to solve bugs

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

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Apple has issued an update to the Android version of Apple Music, fixing two recent problems with the client.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

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Essential really wants to solve the screen notch problem

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

 In a way, Essential is something of a pioneer. Before the iPhone X helped the world reluctantly embrace the screen notch, the company proudly displayed one atop its first flagship. Since then, of course, it’s become a feature, not a bug, with a long list of companies rushing to embrace it on their latest flagship. But Essential’s clearly hoping to solve the issue with a number… Read More
Mobile – TechCrunch
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Cape Town Has More Time to Solve Its Water Crisis. How Will It Use It?

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Earlier this year, there was serious reason to believe that Cape Town, in South Africa, was going to become the first major city in the world to run out of water. Now, the ominous “Day Zero” deadline of the water crisis has shifted to August 27, back from earlier estimates that had it occurring in either March or April.

August 27 is well within the part of the year where the region usually experiences heavy rainfall. As such, city officials have said that it’s no longer appropriate to set a date without taking that precipitation into consideration, according to a report by Buzzfeed.

However, this isn’t to say that the threat is over. If there’s as little rainfall this year as there was in 2017, Day Zero will hit in early 2019.

Residents are being praised for their efforts to conserve water, which have helped push Day Zero back into next year. Buzzfeed reports that Cape Town typically uses around 1.2 billion liters of water per day, but as of late, daily consumption has fallen between 510 and 520 million liters.

Even so, the city requires a more long-term solution for its water needs. The current water crisis came from reduced rainfall leading to a three-year drought, which is only more likely to happen in a climate-changed future.

There have been a litany of suggestions to help Cape Town out of its current shortage, ranging from desalinating ocean water to dragging up a seven-ton iceberg from the Canary Islands (yes, really). As Quartz points out, Cape Town could also learn from cities like Melbourne, Australia, which has maintained more conservative water habits following a similar drought. In Melbourne, both mandatory and voluntary measures in water use — ranging from fines for daytime lawn watering, to rebates for buying more efficient washing machines — have cut water use almost in half since 1996.

The end goal is still the same, but the expanded time frame could offer up solutions that weren’t feasible when there were only weeks left until resources ran out. The amount of rain that comes over the next several months will be crucial, and authorities will have to take full advantage of the brief reprieve to come up with an action plan.

The post Cape Town Has More Time to Solve Its Water Crisis. How Will It Use It? appeared first on Futurism.

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Colorado police turned to Snapchat to solve a drug murder

Newly unsealed documents show that Snapchat played an unexpected role in the investigation of an apparent drug murder in Colorado in 2016. Devon Smeltz disappeared in August 2016, shortly after a late-night disturbance was captured on surveillance video near his home in Fort Collins. Eight days after the incident, Smeltz’s body was discovered in a rural county one hour east of the city, launching an investigation by Fort Collins police.

The prime suspects in the disappearance were a group of five associates from Cincinnati. Shortly after Smeltz’s disappearance, the group was stopped by Illinois highway police driving a white Mercedes sedan registered to Smeltz. A subsequent search of the car turned up a loaded firearm, traces of blood,…

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No, postcards won’t solve our Russian interference problem

We just learned all the ways Russian propaganda agents fooled American social media companies, thanks to the recent indictments of Russian nationals by Team Mueller. After years of these companies forcing us to adhere to their contrived "community s…
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It’s Great That Supermarkets Are Cutting Plastic Waste. But That’s Not Going to Solve the Problem.

Things that belong in the ocean: sharkscoral reefs, mermaids (well, they would if they were real, anyway). Things that don’t belong in the ocean: milk jugs, water bottles, plastic bags.

And yet we’re headed toward a future where our oceans contain more plastic than fish. If she actually existed, Ariel would be so disappointed in us.

She wouldn’t necessarily want to be part of our world, either. The situation up here on land isn’t any better: humans have a serious plastic addiction, and it’s wreaking havoc on our planet.

An Ocean of Plastic [Infographic]
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As supermarkets are one of the primary peddlers of this plastic waste, they’ve been an obvious target for those looking to crack down on it. A recent investigation by The Guardian found U.K. supermarkets produced 800,000 metric tons of plastic packaging waste every year. That alarming statistic has nudged at least a couple of chains toward taking action.

First, the British supermarket chain Iceland vowed to stop using plastic to package any of its own-brand products within five years (nice!). A few weeks later, Asda, another British chain, agreed to do the same – albeit on a much smaller scale (10 percent). The smaller goal shouldn’t be discounted though because Asda wants to achieve it on a much quicker timeline: within 12 months.

So, that’s progress, right? Eh. Maybe not.

“Asda’s pledge to slash plastic use is certainly very welcome — but why can’t it copy Iceland’s lead and ditch plastics from all its own-brand products?” asked Friends of the Earth waste campaigner Julian Kirby in an interview with The Guardian.

That’s a good question.

Tisha Brown’s criticism of Asda’s commitment was a bit more direct.

“A 10 percent reduction in own-brand products over one year doesn’t beat Iceland’s pledge,” the Greenpeace’s oceans campaigner told The Guardian. “If Asda applied the same tactic to reducing plastics as it does to competing on price, we’d be really impressed.”

Dang. Which aisle do you keep the burn cream in, Asda?

Really, it’s hard to fault anyone from responding to Asda’s pledge with an eye roll. Did they not get the memo about plastic outweighing fish in our oceans? Drastic times call for drastic measures, and a 10 percent reduction isn’t anywhere near drastic enough.

The post It’s Great That Supermarkets Are Cutting Plastic Waste. But That’s Not Going to Solve the Problem. appeared first on Futurism.

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