First Black Shark gaming smartphone teaser reveals a curvy corner

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We are eagerly awaiting to hear more about the Black Shark gaming smartphone. This is a Xiaomi-backed company that is planning to release a gaming-oriented smartphone to compete with the first-generation Razer phone. The phone has already been spotted in a couple of benchmarks and an invitation has been sent out for an April 13 event in Beijing, China. The latest piece of news surrounding the Black Shark is a teaser that pulls back the covers on the corner of the phone, revealing a smartphone body with a large-curved corner, contrasting the Razer phone’s blocky…

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Xiaomi Black Shark gaming phone with Snapdragon 845, 8GB RAM to be announced on April 13

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After several leaks, last week official Black Shark account on weibo and Qualcomm China confirmed that it the gaming phone will be powered by Snapdragon 845. Now it has announced that the phone will be announced on April 13th and also confirmed that Xiaomi has invested in the company. Even though some renders of the phone have surfaced online showing physical control buttons, it seems to be MatriMax iPlay edited to look like the Black Shark phone. However, another image of the phone has surfaced in China showing off a standard design. Earlier rumors revealed 8GB of RAM, Android 8.0 Oreo and 2160 x 1080 FHD+ 18:9 display for the phone. The phone is rumored come with a 120 Hz display to compete with the Razer Phone. Black Shark Technology CEO, Peter recently said that the company has the company currently has more than 300 employees, more than 90% are designers and engineers. He also said that many in the team are themselves gamers. We should know more details about the phone soon. Source 1, 2
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Xiaomi Black Shark gaming phone with Snapdragon 845 confirmed

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A new smartphone code-named Blackshark surfaced on AnTuTu and Geekbench recently, which is believed to be Xiaomi’s first gaming smartphone under the new Black shark brand, in which Xiaomi started investing last year. Now the official Black Shark account on weibo and Qualcomm China have confirmed that it will be powered by Snapdragon 845. Earlier rumors revealed 8GB of RAM, Android 8.0 Oreo and 2160 x 1080 FHD+ 18:9 display for the phone. The phone is rumored come with a 120 Hz display to compete with the Razer Phone. It scored 270680 points on AnTuTu and Geekbench score of 2452 for the single-core and 8452 for multi-core on par with other Snapdragon 845-powered smartphones. Since it has officially been confirmed, we can expected more details about the device in the coming weeks, and unveiling probably sometime in April or early May, 2018. Source
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Black Shark phone gets a teaser poster that doesn’t mention parent company Xiaomi

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Remember the Black Shark phone, you know, the one that left Snapdragon 845-shaped bite marks in AnTuTu and Geekbench? Well, here’s a teaser poster for it with a strong Razer vibe. The poster doesn’t say much beyond extolling the Snapdragon 845 chipset by Qualcomm. Still, notice how there’s no mention of Xiaomi, even though it owns part of Black Shark Technology Inc. A teaser poster for the Black Shark phone It looks like Xiaomi is trying to launch a gaming-focused sub-brand. The challenge to the Razer phone is obvious, but we shouldn’t forget the Acer Predator 6 phone (or maybe…

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Marine biologists use connected sensors to monitor shark behaviour

Marine biologists use connected sensors to monitor shark behaviour

Marine biologists have used connected technology to monitor Oceanic Whitetip sharks and better understand their behaviour.

Oceanic Whitetip sharks move around the ocean with great efficiency, exploiting physics to maximize their energy surplus for both hunting and downtime.

In the past, tracking their movements hasn’t been easy, but thanks to an unusual collaboration between a team of marine biologists, an aerospace engineer and some statisticians, more is now known about these elusive animals. 

Over the last few years, this team has been able to generate precise calculations that shine a light on the size, swimming location, water temperatures and daily activities of whitetip sharks.

Read more: InvestEGGator solution uses IoT to combat turtle poachers

Open water inhabitants

FIU marine scientist Yannis Papastamatiou, whose aim was to learn more about the elusive creatures, led the research. Whitetips tend to live in open water, making them much harder to study than their coastal relatives.

Papastamatiou has compared the whitetips’ habitat to a dessert: it’s a large ecosystem where there’s hardly any food available. A great deal of energy is thus expended on the hunt for prey. Papstamatiou wanted to know what behavior could maximize an animal’s energy surplus and understand if this is the way that oceanic whitetips behave.

He teamed up with aerospace engineer Gil Iosilevskii from Technion – Israel Institute of Technology to work out some calculations, based on the optimal flight performance for aircraft. These models, it was determined, could predict the optimal swim speeds for sharks, as well as the best speeds and angles for dives. 

Read more: London Zoo turns to IoT to tackle global poaching menace

Utilising connected tech

The researchers carried out this project in the Bahamas, which is a populous area for whitetips. They tagged the sharks with connected sensors to explore their speed, acceleration and depth.

As well as the sensors, they also used cameras for two sharks. The scientists found that sharks tend to behave optimally, controlling their speed constantly as they ascend and descend.

One of the sharks was able to travel from 160 meters at 4 meters per second vertically, breaching the surface. Normal speed for these animals tends to range from 0.6 to 0.7 per second, so this was a remarkable finding.

“I can’t imagine this shark could see something at the surface from that depth,” said Papastamatiou. “It was going full force in a vertical ascent.” He intends to continue his studies into these large marine predators, using physics, biology and the IoT. 

Read more: Underwater NB-IoT: SMRU tracks seals for environmental data

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Researchers create a robot that can cling to shark skin underwater

Tracking sharks and dolphins in order to study their habits is tough. Doing so requires researchers to attach some sort of sensor or robot to the animal, but it has to be able to stay on underwater and withstand fast swimming speeds as well as twists…
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Sorry Twitter, this Greenland shark is not actually full of pee

Twitter can be a wasteland of heart-wrenching breaking news, trolls, and poorly placed promoted content — but then there are the metal cats and the random factoids, like this viral Twitter thread about Greenland sharks that threw the Verge newsroom into a frenzy today.

Reaction from Verge staff to the Greenland shark Twitter thread.

The Twitter thread went on to say that the Greenland sharks — which live in Arctic waters — can live 500 years, have glowing parasites attached to their eyes, and are eaten in a “fermented pee shark dish” in Iceland. So I called some scientists to fact-check this thread. And…

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Drones and machine learning form shark safety system

Drones and machine learning form shark safety system

The University of Technology Sydney and drone specialist The Little Ripper Group have developed an aerial shark safety system to protect beach-goers from deadly attacks. 

Australia has had its fair share of deadly shark attacks in recent years. The safety of swimmers and surfers is of such concern that the New South Wales government launched a $ 16 million Shark Management Strategy back in 2015. Part of that money has gone towards innovative trials of drones as a means to detect sharks from above and provide an early warning to swimmers.

After a successful pilot program last year that saw UAV company Little Ripper deploy drones and beam a live feed back to an onshore team, the shark safety system is going to be put into practice on some of Queensland’s most popular beaches from September.

What lurks beneath

Spotting sharks under the surface is a near-impossible task when you’re swimming or surfing. In a bid to keep people safe on the coast of Australia, researchers have developed an aerial system capable of flying autonomously over dangerous coastlines to identify sharks from above.

As well as helping to detect sharks, the Little Ripper Life Saver drones will also be able to deploy a small inflatable and other potentially lifesaving gear to swimmers in need of assistance.

Read moreOcean Alliance deploys drones to gather whale data

Spotting sharks from above

Although a bird’s-eye view offers a safer, more useful position from which to spot sharks, people still make mistakes when looking through footage in search of tell-tale fins. At best, they’ll accurately pinpoint sharks around 30 percent of the time, according to Dr Nabin Sharma, a research associate at the University of Technology Sydney’s School of Software.

The new detection software can boost the success rate to closer to 90 percent. Machine learning algorithms have been trained to spot sharks from both moving and still images. The system is also capable of distinguishing sharks from other animals in the water.

Little Ripper’s shark safety system still requires human supervision to verify the results. “It’s not about replacing human beings altogether,” said Sharma. “It’s about assisting human beings to get the work done in a better way with more accuracy. That’s what the application is meant for.”

Read moreAustralia-based WaterGroup partners with Thinxtra on smart water monitoring

Adaptable shark safety

In response to growing numbers of shark attacks off the north-eastern coast of Australia, some controversial steps have been taken by local authorities in recent years. These have included the use of shark nets, a brute-force solution unable to distinguish dangerous predators from other, potentially rare marine life.

Professor Michael Blumenstein of University Technology Sydney (UTS) has been leading the software development project. He said that by using “cutting edge deep neural networks and images processing techniques…the system efficiently distinguishes and identifies sharks from other targets by processing video feeds that are dynamic as well as images, where objects are static.”

“The system will be able to warn swimmers/surfers from overhead with an onboard megaphone attached to Westpac Little Ripper drones when a shark or a potential risk is detected. This cutting-edge AI system developed by UTS will create a positive impact for the public while making beach recreation much safer and more secure.”

Read more: Underwater NB-IoT: SMRU tracks seals for environmental data

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