Tesla says Autopilot was engaged during fatal Model X crash

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Tesla says Autopilot was engaged at the time of a deadly Model X crash that occurred March 23rd in Mountain View, California. The company posted a statement online late Friday, after local news reported that the victim had made several complaints to Tesla about the vehicle’s Autopilot technology prior to the crash in which he died.

After recovering the logs from the crash site, Tesla acknowledged that Autopilot was on, with the adaptive cruise control follow distance set to a minimum. The company also said that the driver, identified as Apple engineer Wei “Walter” Huang, had his hands off the steering wheel and was not responding to warnings to re-take control.

The driver had received several visual and one audible hands-on warning…

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Huawei CEO says the company is still committed to the US market despite “groundless suspicions”

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Huawei has recently come under fire in the US, where government agencies left and right are advising people and companies not to purchase its products. The CIA, FBI, and NSA are concerned that Huawei devices are used to spy on Americans. As you’d expect, Huawei’s consumer products CEO doesn’t think too highly of such assessments. Richard Yu told CNET that “the security risk concerns are based on groundless suspicions and are quite frankly unfair”. “We welcome an open and transparent discussion if it is based on facts”, he continued. Huawei P20 Despite the fact that the government…

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Huawei says it’s still committed to the U.S., in spite of, well, everything

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A funny thing happened the last couple of times I was briefed on a Huawei flagship product: news was breaking about some major roadblock for the company’s U.S. distribution plans. First it was AT&T backing out in the midst of CES and then it was Best Buy’s decision to drop the company just ahead of the big P20 launch (though a rep for the company told me the States were never part of its plans for that handset). 

It’s been one thing after another as the Chinese hardware maker has worked to establish a meaningful presence here in the States. In spite of all of this fallout from government pushback, however, the company insists that it’s not going anywhere.

In an email to CNET, the company’s consumer CEO reaffirmed that commitment. “We are committed to the U.S. market and to earning the trust of U.S. consumers by staying focused on delivering world-class products and innovation,” Yu writes. “We would never compromise that trust.”

The sentiment echoes statements Yu made on-stage at CES in the wake of the AT&T deal implosion — albeit much more measured this time around. Most of Yu’s followup reinforced his earlier assertions that, in spite of multiple warning from various US security departments, this whole thing is blow entirely out of proportion.

“The security risk concerns are based on groundless suspicions and are quite frankly unfair,” Yu adds. ”We welcome an open and transparent discussion if it is based on facts.”

Even if the company’s intentions are as stated, Huawei’s got an epic uphill climb if it’s going to make any sort of dent in the world’s third-largest mobile market. The company’s carrier play is non-existent in a country where most phones are purchased through telecoms. And abandonment by the biggest big box store in the States was insult to injury.

And if the company does manage to reverse those trends, it will still be a hard sell for U.S. consumers after several warnings from the country’s defense departments. 

Mobile – TechCrunch

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Newly-revealed 2016 internal memo says Facebook growth justified even if it kills someone

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A memo written in 2016 has just come to light in which a Facebook VP argues that ‘questionable’ and deceptive tactics to grow the platform are justified – even if they cost someone their life.

The memo was written by one of Facebook’s longest-serving execs, Andrew “Boz” Bosworth …

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Under Armour says 150 million MyFitnessPal accounts compromised in data breach

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Sportswear brand Under Armour announced today that its subsidiary MyFitnessPal was affected in a significant data beach, compromising as many as 150 million accounts. Account information involved in the breach includes user names, email addresses, and hashed passwords, but no financial information like credit card numbers or government or identifiers like social security numbers.

Under Armour acquired MyFitnessPal, a website and mobile app for tracking diet and exercise activity, in 2015 for $ 475 million, when MyFitnessPal had 80 million users. The service has since more than doubled in size thanks in part to the company’s largely agnostic approach to apps and fitness trackers, nearly all of which can be plugged into MyFitnessPal for…

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Under Armour says MyFitnessPal data breach affects 150 million user accounts

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Under Armour MyFitnessPal logos

If you’ve ever used MyFitnessPal, then you should be aware of a new data breach.

Under Armour says that personal details of around 150 million MyFitnessPal user accounts have been breached. The breach occurred in late February 2018, but Under Armour didn’t learn about it until March 25, 2018.

The user data that was affected includes user names, email addresses, and hashed passwords, the majority of which have the hashing function called bcrypt used to secure passwords. Under Armour says that government identifiers like Social Security numbers and driver’s license numbers were not affected.

Under Armour is currently investigating the breach and is working on the matter with “leading data security firms” as well as law enforcement.

It’s good to hear that information like SSNs weren’t a part of this breach, but this is still a big deal for Under Armour and MyFitnessPal users. Under Armour says that it has begun notifying MyFitnessPal users about the breach using both email and in-app messaging, so if you’ve used MyFitnessPal in the past, you should keep an eye out for a message from Under Armour.

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Trustlook Says App Auditing Tool Can Help Protect Facebook Users

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The Cambridge Analytica data-harvesting scandal has forced Facebook to take significant steps to protect its users’ privacy. App developers are no longer permitted to access as much data about Facebook users as they once could. In addition, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says the company will “audit” thousands of apps and “investigate all apps that had access to large amounts” of data in the past.

What that means exactly is unclear, asserts the team at Trustlook in their media release this week.

Does Facebook have the expertise to review the thousands of apps out there operating under the “old rules,” siphoning user’s (and their friends’) data surreptitiously? Can it do it at scale? That remains to be seen, but it’s clear the company needs better visibility into how user information is being handled by third-party apps.

Trustlook, a cybersecurity company based in San Jose, has a product called SECUREai App Insights that can already do what Facebook is promising to do, a provided statement reads. In fact, the product is currently securing three of the top five app stores in the world.

So how does it work?

SECUREai App Insights provides detailed information about mobile applications. It offers more than 80 pieces of information for each app, including permissions, libraries, risky API calls, network activity, and a risk score. All the information is presented in an easy-to-use, actionable format so that app store owners, app developers, researchers, and companies such as Facebook can make informed decisions.

Most importantly for Facebook, Trustlook’s technology can determine if apps that are using Facebook Login, the feature which is the main avenue through which app developers collect data, are doing so properly, or if they are abusing permissions or mishandling user data in any way.

When people use Facebook Login, they grant the app’s developer a range of information from their Facebook profile—things such as their name, location, email or friends list. Back in 2015, Facebook also allowed developers to collect some information from the friend networks of people who used Facebook Login. That means that while a single user may have agreed to hand over their data, developers could also access some data about their friends. Needless to say, this realization among Facebook users has caused a huge backlash.

“Our technology can make the Facebook ecosystem much safer,” said Allan Zhang, co-founder and CEO of Trustlook. “Facebook’s growth has made them a target for malicious developers, so this extra security layer is critical for them and would be a great benefit to their users.”

Facebook is not the only company offering a sign in feature. Twitter, LinkedIn, Google, and Yahoo have similar features. All of these companies need to remain diligent about what user information is being granted to apps, Zhang said.

For more information on Trustlook and SECUREai App Insights, click here.

The post Trustlook Says App Auditing Tool Can Help Protect Facebook Users appeared first on Mobile Marketing Watch.


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ARKit app downloads exceed 13M in 6 months, nearly half are games, report says

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Fresh statistics from market research firm Sensor Tower suggest uptake of Apple’s ARKit is on a steady upward trajectory, with more than 13 million augmented reality apps downloaded since the framework launched last September.
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The BBC says it’s being squeezed out by Netflix and Amazon

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The BBC has released its second annual report since its new charter was established and the broadcaster paints a rather bleak picture for itself. It highlights the fact that the media landscape has changed quite rapidly in recent years and will most…
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Tim Cook says Apple’s customers are not its product, unlike Facebook

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Enlarge / Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., speaks during an event at Lane Technical College Prep High School in Chicago, Illinois, on Tuesday, March 27, 2018. (credit: Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Apple CEO Tim Cook said in an interview with MSNBC and Recode on Wednesday that Silicon Valley, and notably Facebook, should be far more careful with its customers’ data in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica disclosures.

“I think the best regulation is no regulation, is self-regulation,” he said, according to Recode. “However, I think we’re beyond that here.”

Cook reiterated points that he and former CEO Steve Jobs made previously, that Apple’s business model—unlike Google, Facebook, and many other tech companies—is predicated on selling physical products rather than capturing data about customers.

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apple – Ars Technica

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