PUBG Mobile for iOS and Android Review

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

PUBG or PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds is finally on mobile. After releasing on Windows in March of 2017 in early access beta form, with the 1.0 release along with the Xbox One release coming out in December, the game has now been released on iOS and Android worldwide after a brief period of China exclusivity. I tried it on six different devices to see what the mobile experience of the game is like. Before I begin with the review, here is a brief primer on the game. PUBG is what is now known as the battle royale style of game. While not the first game of this type, it’s the one that made it…

GSMArena.com – Latest articles

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Phiaton BT 150 NC review: Great sound and noise canceling in an affordable package

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Taking a step away from fitness-oriented audio, I have recently spent some time with Phiaton’s BT 150 NC noise canceling earphones. This is aimed at traveling professionals who want to have great noise canceling without breaking the bank. Phiaton manages that with the $ 150 BT 150 NC, all while providing very good sound quality and comfort.

As you well know, dear reader, cut corners are inevitable, especially when discussing anything with the word “affordable” attached to it.

Read More

Phiaton BT 150 NC review: Great sound and noise canceling in an affordable package was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Android Police – Android news, reviews, apps, games, phones, tablets

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Wicked Audio Endo review: The boring kind of cheap headphones

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Bluetooth audio products take many forms at several price points, offering us the consumers multiple options to meet our respective needs. While some can go for the top-dollar, high-end items from Bose, others may need something under $ 100 or even $ 50. Affordable audio is potentially lucrative, especially when a customer can go find them at his or her nearest Walmart. Growing up, the only name of true note I knew in this particular market was Skullcandy, an edgy company set on providing decent-ish headphones and earphones that looked nice/cool, but didn’t cost a whole ton.

Read More

Wicked Audio Endo review: The boring kind of cheap headphones was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Android Police – Android news, reviews, apps, games, phones, tablets

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Fibaro Wall Plug review: A smart, well-designed outlet that monitors energy use

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Fibaro Wall Plug with USB port (Credit: Fibaro)

I’ve long used Belkin’s $ 35 Wemo Insight Switch in my home, both for automation and energy monitoring. Now, Fibaro has a new, competing product called the Fibaro Wall Plug. It comes in two options: a $ 50 version and a $ 60 model that adds an integrated USB plug. I’ve been testing  a review unit of the latter and it’s a great, if not more expensive alternative, that has some automation limitations depending on which hub you use.

Yes, you’ll need a hub for the Wall Plug because it uses a Z-Wave radio for connectivity. In my testing, I connected the Plug to a SmartThings hub — technically an Nvidia Shield TV with Samsung SmartThings USB Link — but to use all of the Plug’s smart functionality, you’ll really need a Fibaro Home Center controller and the Fibaro mobile app. I’ll explain why in a bit.

From a design standpoint, the plug is elegant. I like the look of it and also the fact that it doesn’t cover up the second outlet in your wall, which some smart plugs can do. The rounded corners and small-ish size of the 2.32-inch plug look very modern and clean.

Note that since SmartThings doesn’t natively support the Fibaro Wall Plug, I had to install two custom handlers so that the SmartThings hub would recognize and report usage on both the main outlet and the USB port. It’s a pretty easy, cut-and-paste process, but worth noting.

Getting connected

Once that’s done, there’s not much else to the installation of the Fibaro Plug though. You simply triple click a button on the Plug to put it in pairing mode and use your hub to complete the process. I was able to pair it with my SmartThings hub in under a minute.

Once connected, you just plug in any standard electrical or USB device to the Fibaro unit. I used it to power the Raspberry Pi we set up for our IoT Podcast VM and also some other appliances, such as my Keurig coffee maker and June oven. I also added the Plug to both my Amazon Echo and Google Home accounts so I could turn the plug on or off with voice commands. The Fibaro Plug worked with both assistants for basic power commands.

Monitoring energy usage

One of the unique features of the Fibaro Plug is the LED ring on the front of it. The color of the ring changes to indicate how much power the plug is drawing based on seven unique colors including white, red, green, blue, yellow, cyan or magenta. The latter, for example, shows between 1350W and 1800W.

The June Oven uses 1675W, causing the Wall Plug LED ring to show magenta.

Initially, the LED ring didn’t light up when the plug was under a load. A quick reset of the Plug (hold the Plug button until the LED turns yellow, let go and quickly tap the button) fixed it. Plus, you can see that information in real time or view the historical use with the SmartThings app for both the main outlet and the USB port. The LED is configurable if you don’t want it on at all or if you want to customize the colors for different power usage levels.

The SmartThings app can also control the state of the Fibaro Plug, meaning with one tap on your phone, you can turn the Plug on or off. You can even do this when away from your home. Personally, I like to have it always on since most appliances have their own power switch. However, if you’re planning to use the Plug with a lamp, this is an easy way to turn that light on or off, even if you’re not using a smart bulb.

Automations

It’s tricky when it comes to automation and getting information from the Fibaro Plug, however. Yes, you can create automations that turn the plug on or off — helpful for lights — but that’s about it in the SmartThings world. And unless you use the Fibaro hub and app, you won’t get energy alerts. And although it would be nice to know if my refrigerator lost power, I can live without the notifications on energy usage. But my plans for automating the plug fell a little short when using SmartThings with it.

For example, I’d like to put one of these plugs in our master bathroom and have my wife use it with her hair dryer. Why? Because drying her hair is the last thing she does in the morning before she heads down to the kitchen. If I could automate the kitchen light based on the power draw of the hair dryer, she’d automatically enter a well-lit kitchen. The only way I can see to do this would be to use a Fibaro gateway and corresponding Fibaro app.

Regardless, the Fibaro Plug works well if you understand the hub and software limitations when using it with SmartThings, which could eventually change with an updated device handler. If you do have a Fibaro Home Center, you’ll get all of the impressive functionality the Plug offers.

Stacey on IoT | Internet of Things news and analysis

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Oppo R15 and R15 Pro hands-on review

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Oppo just announced its R15 flagship duo, which not only represents the latest and greatest from the world’s fifth largest manufacturer, but also comes to show what to expect from OnePlus and Vivo – the other two in BBK Electronics’ smartphone trifecta.

GSMArena.com – Latest articles

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

ASUS NovaGo review: ‘Always online’ comes with limitations

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

As the first Snapdragon-powered PC available, the ASUS NovaGo has a lot riding on it. When Qualcomm and Microsoft teamed up to make connected PCs, they promised devices that would remain always on, always online and provide access to the apps you nee…
Engadget RSS Feed
Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Review: OnePack backpack lives up to its roomy name

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Marketing language often invites a reviewer to find the flaw in the claim. So skepticism was in order when the OnePack arrived with the declaration of being the “Most Functional Backpack.” I have a backpack for every time I heard that one. But of all the backpacks I’ve shouldered for reviews, OnePack at least comes […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)

Cult of Mac

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

‘Far Cry 5’ review: Destruction and doomsday in America

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

By Daniel Howley The Far Cry series is known for dropping players into huge, open-world settings and letting them sew chaos and destruction as they take on each title's menacing villain. But those settings and enemies have always been based in large…
Engadget RSS Feed
Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Review: Netgear’s Arlo Baby camera with Apple HomeKit

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Article Image

It doesn’t come cheap, and its newfound HomeKit support is actually the least interesting thing about it, but the Arlo Baby is a quality baby monitor that has a life beyond the nursery.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

ASUS Chromebook Flip C302 long-term review: The laptop that brought me back to Chrome OS

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

I’ve never been a fan of buying expensive laptops, even once I could actually afford them. Just like with smartphones, there’s a certain point where the added features can’t justify the $ 1,000+ prices, unless you are doing heavy productivity or gaming. My first laptop was the ASUS Eee PC 1001PXD netbook, which I was pretty happy with at the time (now the 1024×600 screen sounds atrocious), but the casing eventually started to crack apart.

Read More

ASUS Chromebook Flip C302 long-term review: The laptop that brought me back to Chrome OS was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Android Police – Android news, reviews, apps, games, phones, tablets

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app