Galaxy S9+ vs. iPhone X real-life speed test: A huge upset we didn’t see coming

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Galaxy S9 Plus vs. iPhone X Speed Test

The Galaxy S9 is the best Android phone out there, but it’s not faster than the iPhone X when it comes to benchmarks and intensive tasks. That’s right, the A11 Bionic chip is still miles ahead of the competition in 2018. But the competition has gotten so good over the years that the Galaxy S9+ can actually outperform the iPhone X in some real-life usage tests.

That’s something we didn’t necessarily see coming, but it finally happened. Samsung’s latest flagship handset beat the most recent iPhone — and this wasn’t even the most powerful Galaxy S9+ you can purchase.

Let’s revisit the “rules” of these real-life speed tests. You take two or more phones that you want to compare, you connect them to the same wireless network, you install the same apps and arrange them in the same order on the home screen, and then you run two different app launch “laps.”

The first lap shows you how fast each phone loads applications, while the second lap focuses on how fast an app is reloaded from memory. In other words, the test tries to replicate real life smartphone usage, where you’d be switching between various apps during the day, including web apps that load almost immediately, as well as more resource intensive apps like games.

YouTube channel EverythingApplePro, which does this sort of test every time a new smartphone launches, has completed its Galaxy S9+ vs. iPhone X test. The winner is — and I’m surprised it actually happened — the Galaxy S9+.

The iPhone X wins the first lap only because it can process 4K videos faster than the Galaxy S9+. But Samsung’s phone, powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845, does exceptionally well. What really helps the Samsung phone is the significant bump in memory. The Galaxy S9+ has 6GB of RAM compared to the iPhone’s 3GB — the Galaxy S9 only has 4GB of RAM. That extra RAM lets the Samsung phone breeze through opening apps from memory, and it’s something we saw happen with the Galaxy Note 8 last year and other phones that pack more RAM than Apple’s iPhones. Also of note, iOS 11 has had memory management issues since it was first released.

The video shows benchmark tests for both phones, including Geekbench 4 (where iPhone X wins) and Antutu (where the Galaxy S9+ scores better). It also looks at single-app load times, boot time, biometrics performance, and wireless data speeds, with the Galaxy S9+ doing extremely well in all of them.

We’ve praised Apple’s iPhone performance in the past, as older iPhones would consistently outperform brand new Snapdragon and Exynos-powered Galaxy phones in similar tests. This time around, the Galaxy S9 is the clear winner, and I wonder how the Exynos 9810 version does. It sure looks like Apple has some fixing to do if the most powerful mobile chip out there can’t really prove it’s the best in these tests. Watch the full clip below.

Apple – BGR

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Niantic to host 48 real-life Ingress events around the world

Niantic hasn't forgotten its old, less-popular game Ingress even though its name has mostly been associated with Pokémon Go these past couple of years. After giving us a sneak peek of its revamp called Ingress Prime late last year, the AR game…
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Travis Kalanick is now a real-life billionaire

The Uber founder’s bank account will grow by $ 1.4 billion thanks to the SoftBank deal.

Travis Kalanick is selling almost a third of his shares in Uber as part of the tender offer planned by SoftBank.

Kalanick, the founder of Uber and its CEO until this summer, tried to sell about half of his shares in Uber, according to people with knowledge of the matter, but like all other shareholders, is only able to sell about 58% of what he sought because too many sellers tried to rid of their shares. That means he’ll part with about 29% of his shares.

Several other Uber shareholders sold much of their holdings, including Menlo Ventures, which parted with a similar percentage of its holdings as Kalanick did. Large sellers are also expected to include Kalanick’s co-founder Garrett Camp and Benchmark, the venture firm with which Kalanick quarreled.

But some other institutional investors in Uber declined to sell shares, including Lowercase Capital and Kleiner Perkins.

SoftBank is buying 15% of the company from existing Uber shareholders like Kalanick and SoftBank’s co-investors are purchasing an additional 3% ownership stake.

Kalanick owned about 10% of the company prior to SoftBank’s investment. He was telling associates as recently as this summer that he had no plans to sell any of his shares, but his thinking became more opaque to outsiders in recent weeks.

Long a billionaire on paper, Kalanick’s personal bank account will now grow by $ 1.4 billion, given the each share is worth about $ 33 in the SoftBank transaction. The most recent transaction values Uber at $ 48 billion.

Uber’s investors ousted from the CEO chair this summer, but Kalanick remains on the company’s board. The decision to sell his shares will almost certainly reduce his power in company debates.

Kalanick’s stock sale was first reported by Bloomberg.

Recode – All

A Real-Life “Iron Man” Jet Pack Just Smashed World Speed Records

Flying Fast

Remember the guy who built a real-life “Iron Man” suit? His name is Richard Browning, and he owns a company called Gravity which is dedicated to developing his invention, the body-controlled jet engine suit named Daedalus. Now, Browning has added a Guinness world record title to this list of accomplishments.

Browning successfully flew his Daedalus suit at a record speed of speed of 51.53 km/h (32.02 mph) on his third attempt above the Lagoona Park in Reading, England. Despite mistiming a turn and dropping into the lake a little while later, Browning still managed to set a new world record for fastest speed in a body-controlled jet engine power suit.

The Daedalus is a uniquely designed exoskeleton —like Iron Man’s suit only bulkier — equipped with gas turbine engines, four of which are mounted on the arms and another two on each hip. Browning previously said that the suit could eventually go as fast as 321 km/h (200 mph) at several hundreds of meters above the ground.

We Love Tony Stark

Gravity, Browning’s company, now has hundreds of thousands of pounds in funding for the continuous development of the Daedalus, with a recently completed series of funding adding some $ 650,000 (£500,000) more, according to the Mirror. All of that funding is necessary, however, as it costs around $ 250,000 to develop each custom suit. The company is currently working to devise protocols so that the Civil Aviation Authority will allow the Daedalus for commercial use.

While the Daedalus might be the first personal jet pack suit to be made available to the public, it’s not the only one of its kind currently being developed. The world’s first true jetpack, called the JB-9, took flight back in 2015. The year after, JB-9’s developer, a company called Jetpack Aviation, entered into talks with the U.S. military to work on further development of the device.

More recently, aviation giant Boeing announced that they were sponsoring a two-year long competition to encourage the development of personal vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) gear, which is essentially what an “Iron Man suit” is.

All of this work makes it easy to imagine advanced personal modes of flight coming within the next few years. Together with autonomous vehicles and flying cars, this Iron Man suit is helping to shape the future of personal transportation.

The post A Real-Life “Iron Man” Jet Pack Just Smashed World Speed Records appeared first on Futurism.


The Future is Here: Six Of Today’s Most Advanced, Real-Life Cyborgs

Today, people’s bodies are more perfectly melded with technology than we could have imagined mere decades ago. Superhuman strength, dexterity, and senses are no longer science-fiction — they’re already here.

Though cutting-edge technology offers us a glimpse into the capabilities of enhanced humans in the future, it’s most useful these days as support for people who have been affected by a disability. Cyborg technology can replace missing limbs, organs, and bodily senses. Sometimes, it can even enhance the body’s typical function.

Here are six of the most striking examples of this cyborg present. They show us how far we have already come, and how far we could go in the future.

Hearing Colors With An Antenna

Image Credit: TED

Activist and artist Neil Harbisson was born without the ability to see color. In 2004, he decided to change that. He mounted an electronic antenna to the lower back of his skull that turns frequencies of light into vibrations his brain interprets as sound, allowing him to “hear color.” These frequencies are even able to go beyond the visual spectrum, allowing him to “hear” invisible frequencies such as infrared and ultraviolet.

“There is no difference between the software and my brain, or my antenna and any other body part. Being united to cybernetics makes me feel that I am technology,” he said in a National Geographic interview.

His body modification was not always well-accepted: the British government took issue when the antenna showed up in Harbisson’s passport photo. Harbisson  fought the government to keep it in. He won, becoming the first “legally recognized” cyborg.

The LUKE Arm

Image Credit: DARPA

The LUKE Arm (named after Luke Sywalker) is a highly advanced prosthetic that lends the wearer a sense of touch. A specialized motor can provide feedback to mimic the resistance offered by various physical objects — users can feel that a pillow offers less resistance than a brick. With the help of funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the finished design received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in 2014.

Electronic sensors receive signals from the wearer’s muscles that the device then translates into physical movement. The wearer can manipulate multiple joints at once through switches that can be controlled with his or her feet.  The first commercially available LUKE arm became available to a small group of military amputees in late 2016. Amputees can now buy the prosthetic through their physicians, but the device is rumored to cost around $ 100,000.

Artificial Vision

Image Credit: seeingwithsound/YouTube

In his 20s, Jens Naumann was involved in two separate accidents that shot metal shards into his eyes, causing him to lose his vision. In 2002, at the age of 37, Naumann participated in a clinical trial performed at the Lisbon-based Dobelle Institute in which a television camera was connected straight to his brain, bypassing his faulty eyes. Dots of light combined to form shapes and outlines of the world around him, giving him “this kind of dot matrix-type vision.” The system enabled him to see Christmas lights outlining his home in Canada that year.

Unfortunately, the system failed only after a couple of weeks. And when William Dobelle, the original inventor of the technology, passed away in 2004, he left behind almost no documentation, leaving technicians no instructions for how to repair Naumann’s system. In 2010, Naumann had the system surgically removed, rendering him completely blind once again.

Mind-Controlled Bionic Leg

Image Credit: RIC

The mind-controlled bionic leg was first used in 2012 by Zac Vawter, a software engineer from Seattle whose leg was amputated above the knee in 2009. The technology that translates brain signals into physical movement, called Targeted Muscle Reinnvervation (TMR), was first created in 2003 for upper-limb prosthetics. But Vawter’s prosthetic was revolutionary because it was the first leg prosthetic use it.

In 2012, Zac Vawter climbed the 2,100 steps of the Willis Tower in Chicago, with the help of his prosthetic leg. It took him 53 minutes and nine seconds.


The bebionic Hand

Image Credit: Ottobock

Prosthetics company bebionic has created some of the most sophisticated prosthetic hands to date. Individual motors move every joint along every digit independently. To help with everyday use, the bebionic has 14 pre-determined grip patterns. Highly sensitive motors vary the speed and force of the grip in real-time — it’s delicate enough for the user to hold an egg between his or her index finger and thumb, and robust enough to hold up to 45 kilograms (99 pounds).

The bebionic hand has been available commercially since 2010. Models released in the years since have improved its battery life, flexibility, and software.

The Eyeborg Project

Image Credit: The Eyeborg Project

Toronto-based filmmaker Rob Spence decided to replace his missing right eye with a prosthetic equipped with a wirelessly-transmitting video camera. Thanks to a partnership with RF wireless design company and a group of electrical engineers, Spence created a prosthetic eye shell that could house enough electronics in such a small, confined space.

The camera can record up to 30 minutes of footage before depleting the battery. Spence used footage captured by his eye prosthetic in a documentary called Deus Ex: The Eyeborg Documentary.

The post The Future is Here: Six Of Today’s Most Advanced, Real-Life Cyborgs appeared first on Futurism.


Meet the EU’s adorably awkward real-life superhero: Captain Europe

I know that this doesn’t strictly have anything to do with tech — except for the social media presence — but trust me, you’ll want to know more about this. While scrolling through Twitter, on the prowl for stories on EU tech regulations (I’m the fun guy at the office), I came across the profile of none other than Europe’s only real-life superhero: Captain Europe. Donning a renaissance style garb — gold-and-blue hat and mask along with a cape made of the European flag — Captain Europe goes around the continent spreading his message of unity and the European partnership.…

This story continues at The Next Web
The Next Web

Tone-deaf cop addresses real-life shooting while playing video games

This week, a Seattle police officer chose to talk about the death of a pregnant woman at the hands of his fellow officers … while livestreaming a video game. On June 18th, officers came to Charleena Lyles‘ home to investigate a burglary she reported. Lyles, a pregnant mother of four, was then killed in a scuffle with the officers. Some of the details of the case are unclear, but it’s known for sure three of her children were home at the time. It’s a deeply upsetting case that has raised troubling questions about the officers’ use of force. One officer recapped…

This story continues at The Next Web
The Next Web

Amazon’s new Dash Wand with Alexa is a real-life magic wand for your kitchen

The next time you run out dish soap, you could add the item to your shopping list via Google Home, or you could ask Alexa to add one to your next AmazonFresh order. You could even pull out a paper and pencil like an Aunt Tillie and write “dish soap” on a real, literal, physical shopping list, before the long and tedious trek to the supermarket. Or, you could grab your magic wand, point it at the empty bottle, and go about your day.

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Amazon’s new Dash Wand with Alexa is a real-life magic wand for your kitchen was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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