‘Subscribe with Google’ attempts to simplify how web readers pay for news

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

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Google is launching a new initiative to make it easier for users to subscribe to their favorite news sites, without leaving the service, or engaging in a lengthy sign-up process.
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Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Hands on: Apple’s ‘Netflix of Magazines’ Texture provides a wealth of content to readers

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

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Texture allows access to dozens of magazines for a monthly price of $ 9.99 — and it is now in Apple’s hands.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Salon asks readers to pick their poison: ads or crypto mining

If you use an ad-blocker, you'll now be met with a pop-up when you visit Salon's website, the Financial Times reports. It will offer you two choices — turn off your ad-blocker or let the website mine cryptocurrency with some of your computer's extra…
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Salon is using adblocking readers’ CPU power to mine cryptocurrency


It seems popular online magazine Salon is the latest company to hop onto the cryptocurrency mining bandwagon. The publication has updated its website to require users to disable their ad-blockers for the right to read articles – or alternatively, lend their CPU power to mine cryptocurrency. Visitors are now prompted to either turn off ad-blockers altogether or select the new ‘Suppress Ads’ option to “block ads by allowing Salon to use your unused computing power.” According to a clarification on its website, opting to lend your “unused processing power” will only happen “when you are browsing Salon.com.” The other options are to…

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The Next Web

Recode readers and staff share their 2018 New Year’s resolutions

A whole lot of disconnecting going on.

New Year’s resolutions are often made and rarely kept. But at the very least, they’re a revealing window into what we would like to change about our lives.

And after an informal survey of Recode readers and employees, there’s a very clear theme this year: In 2018, we want to be less plugged in. Some people just want to use certain services less than they do now, while others architected ways to disconnect more dramatically.

“Less tech,” reader Chip Roberson wrote in via email. “Some analog/manual systems are just easier to use and maintain. … On balance, tech seems to be complicating life, not making it simpler.”

Reader Linda Rosewood had a simple but wise idea: Removing her credit card number from the personal information saved by her web browser “to limit impulse purchases.”

Recode’s Senior Social Media Editor Kurt Wagner said he wanted “less screen time before falling asleep,” resolving to read more instead. Meanwhile, Senior Copy Editor Elizabeth Crane has decided 2018 will be the culmination of her resolution this year, to cut the cord with her cable company.

“I had to keep ‘the cable’ for internet,” Crane said. “So I’m thinking 2018 will be the year I upgrade from cable to fiber.”

My own New Year’s resolution is also a continuation of sorts: Earlier this year, I mostly quit Facebook and came out of the experience much happier for it. In 2018, my resolution is to audit all of the other digital addictions in my life — especially Twitter and YouTube — and either quit if I find them to be largely harmful or set firm limits on how much time I can waste on them.

Too Embarrassed to Ask co-host Lauren Goode isn’t planning to quit email or any other major services, but she is embarking on a plan to make her email-addicted life more sane.

“I plan to unsubscribe from every service I’m not really using and attempt to delete accounts from ones I’m really never going to use again,” Goode said. “Deleting accounts can be a lot harder, and sometimes requires sending notes directly to customer service about it, but it can be gratifying to know you don’t have some random internet account out there still in existence.”

“Today, I unsubscribed from Land’s End,” she added. “I can’t possibly remember the last time I bought something from Land’s End.”


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A Christmas gift for AP readers

Merry Christmas, and Happy Holidays AP readers. I can’t tell you what a pleasure it is working at Android Police. One of my favorite parts of the job is interacting with all of you. Without you guys, there wouldn’t be any point to what we do. More importantly, there wouldn’t be any money, and as much as we enjoy our work, I don’t think any of us would work here for free, except Corbin, he still doesn’t know the rest of us get paid (shhhh).

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A Christmas gift for AP readers was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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A gift for AP readers plus a guaranteed way to banish the bah-humbugs this Christmas

Merry Christmas, and Happy Holidays AP readers. I can’t tell you what a pleasure it is working at Android Police. One of my favorite parts of the job is interacting with all of you. Without you guys, there wouldn’t be any point to what we do. More importantly, there wouldn’t be any money, and as much as we enjoy our work, I don’t think any of us would work here for free, except Corbin, he still doesn’t know the rest of us get paid (shhhh).

Read More

A gift for AP readers plus a guaranteed way to banish the bah-humbugs this Christmas was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Android Police – Android News, Apps, Games, Phones, Tablets

‘Top 5’ Phone Maker Mass-Ordered In-Display Fingerprint Readers

Interface tech company Synaptics announced on Tuesday that it has begun “mass production” of a display-embedded fingerprint sensor for a “top five” manufacturer.

The company’s new Clear ID FS9500 family is a series of optical, in-display fingerprint sensors. Notably, Synaptics said they’re specifically designed for edge-to-edge, bezel-free “infinity displays” similar to the one on the iPhone X and recent Android flagships. As far as how it works, the company states that its display-embedded sensors “magically activate” only when needed.

Synaptics has been working on display-embedded fingerprint technology for some time and announced its first working version — the Clear ID FS9100 — back in December of last year. The FS9500 announced today is an upgraded version of that technology.

The human interface company added that its fingerprint sensors work with wet, dry and cold fingers. Because it’s built under the display glass, it’s waterproof and scratch-proof. And, performance-wise, Synaptics said that it’ll work “twice as fast” as 3D facial recognition systems (which, at this point in time, is basically calling out Face ID).

Who Is the Fingerprint Sensor For?

Of course, the big question about Synaptics’ announcement is which smartphone maker has tapped them for the under-display fingerprint sensors. Synaptics did not specify beyond saying that it’s a “top five” OEM.

While it’s worth noting that Synaptics is a known Apple supplier, the Cupertino iPhone-maker has long relied on its own proprietary solution for its Touch ID tech. It’s also unclear whether or not future iPhones will even sport a Touch ID sensor — it’s been left off of the company’s newest iPhone X flagship, and Apple engineers have explicitly stated that Face ID is the future.

Combine that with rumors of Face ID coming to Apple’s entire iPhone lineup and possibly its iPad Pro lineup in 2018, and that makes the “top 5” OEM unlikely to be Apple.

It’s more probable that Synaptics is referring to an Android manufacturer, especially since a full-fledged, 3D facial recognition system is still forecasted to be a few years off for Android makers. As far as which Android manufacturer, Samsung, Oppo, Vivo and Huawei are all candidates.

Before the iPhone X’s unveiling in September, Apple was long rumored to be working on its own display-embedded fingerprint sensor technology. While several Apple staff have disputed those rumors, it’s still not clear whether Apple spent any energy exploring an in-display solution before settling on Face ID. While Apple could include a relocated, display-embedded Touch ID sensor in a future iPhone, it’s a bit far-fetched at this point.

On that note, knowing how Android manufacturers operate, it’s certainly looking likely that one of the major OEMs will “borrow” Apple’s rumored idea and debut a flagship with a relocated, under-display fingerprint sensor next year.

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BuzzFeed is losing website traffic as readers head for more traditional news sites

The New York Times, Fox News and the Washington Post have eclipsed BuzzFeed in U.S. visitors, according to comScore.

This post has been updated.

Major news sites have seen increased readership as Americans try to make sense of the tumultuous political climate, but BuzzFeed has seen its web traffic decline.

The company announced layoffs yesterday after missing revenue targets. A rep for BuzzFeed, which has long focused its business on advertising that travels across the web on sites like Facebook — but is increasingly trying to generate revenue from its own site — said the layoffs are “completely unrelated” and that its audience is “a major asset.”

While U.S. web traffic to CNN, the New York Times, Fox News and the Washington Post has grown over the past year, unique visitors to BuzzFeed’s website have been falling over the last two years. It saw 69.8 million U.S. readers in October, a 10 percent drop from the 77.4 million readers it drew in October 2016, and a 12 percent drop from 2015 when it had 79.3 million readers, according to comScore data.

Another third-party data source supports comScore’s findings. BuzzFeed’s website traffic in the U.S. declined to 106 million visits this October, down from 134.7 million visits in October 2016, according to data from SimilarWeb.

Since BuzzFeed does a lot of its publishing straight to Facebook, these figures don’t reflect that traffic. People watching its Tasty videos, for example, don’t show up in the data.

The measurement “doesn’t accurately represent our true reach,” a BuzzFeed spokesperson told Recode. “Last month, BuzzFeed overall had more than nine billion monthly global content views across platforms, and BuzzFeed News had more than 250 million pageviews to our web pages.”

According to BuzzFeed’s own measurements conducted through Nielsen — which include site traffic as well as social traffic on Facebook — BuzzFeed reached 163 million U.S. users in October, up from 160 million in August.

BuzzFeed declined to disclose the percentage of its revenue that occurs off-site on platforms like Facebook. But traffic to its website is still important for the publisher, which recently started letting advertisers put banner and other ads on its web pages. BuzzFeed also needs web traffic to help sell gadgets, another recent revenue source.

The company has built a lot of its business on social media, which has become a fickle source of traffic. Facebook is constantly readjusting its algorithms and publishers have lost out as a result of the latest changes. It caused traffic to viral sites like Upworthy and Distractify to plummet.

BuzzFeed’s site gets the biggest portion of its web traffic — 42 percent — from social media, according to SimilarWeb data over the past 18 months. This has propelled BuzzFeed’s business on social platforms, but also gives BuzzFeed less control over its destiny.

At the same time, CNN, the Washington Post, the New York Times and Fox News all saw peak web readership around last year’s presidential election and, more importantly, have managed to sustain gains amid continued political tension. Unlike BuzzFeed and other virally driven sites, the news sites get a majority of their traffic from readers going directly to their websites, or through search, according to SimilarWeb.

Facebook has historically made changes that affect publisher reach. The social giant started testing a news-only feed in a few countries earlier this year, for example, which crushed publisher traffic and created a potential scenario where publishers could be forced to pay Facebook in order to reach readers.

In an effort to combat fake news, Facebook recently employed a “disputed” tag for posts for stories that might be considered inaccurate by third-party fact-checkers working with the social network. Facebook has also been trying to show users more story options, with the idea that more options might present more viewpoints on the same piece of news.

In general, publications that downsized their editorial staff when they pivoted to video recently saw their traffic tank, but that doesn’t seem to be the case with BuzzFeed, which maintained a robust editorial staff.

This post has been edited and updated with additional comment from BuzzFeed and additional context.


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Android makers looking into 3D sensing, under-display fingerprint readers sidelined

The under-display fingerprint reader may end up being replaced before it even becomes mainstream, at least in high-end smartphones, if a report by analyst Ming-Chi Kuo is right on the money. According to the paper, Android phone makers are looking into 3D mapping solutions for facial recognition in the wake of the iPhone X announcement with similar tech. The inquiries by smartphone manufacturers into 3D sensing have more than tripled since the announcement of the iPhone X, the analyst reports. In addition to the security applications, these technologies allow for augmented reality use, as…

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