Apple’s legal problems over battery slowdowns aren’t going away any time soon

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iPhone Slowdown Lawsuits

Apple has to face at least 61 lawsuits that were filed against the iPhone maker soon after the company acknowledged that it slowed iPhones down via software to prevent unexpected shutdowns caused by old batteries.

A report a few days ago said that all class actions may be merged into a single lawsuit in the near future. In the meantime, U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation ruled that all iPhone slowdown lawsuits should be transferred to the U.S. District Court for Northern California.

Here’s an excerpt from the ruling:

These actions share factual questions arising from allegations that Apple included code in updates to its mobile operating system (iOS) that significantly reduced the performance of older-model iPhones. Plaintiffs also allege that Apple misrepresented the nature of the iOS updates and failed to adequately disclose to iPhone owners the impact the iOS updates would have on the performance of their iPhones.

Discovery regarding the engineering of the iPhone and the iOS updates likely will be technical and complex. Plaintiffs assert similar causes of action for false advertising, alleged unfair business practices, trespass to chattels, breach of contract, and unjust enrichment. Moreover, plaintiffs bring these actions on behalf of overlapping putative classes of iPhone owners. Moreover, plaintiffs bring these actions on behalf of overlapping putative classes of iPhone owners. Centralization thus will eliminate duplicative discovery; prevent inconsistent pretrial rulings, including with respect to class certification; and conserve the resources of the parties, their counsel, and the judiciary

More than half of the lawsuits were already filed in the Northern District of California, MacRumors explains.

Apple first confirmed the intentional slow down of iPhones back in December, soon after a Redditor discovered that his iPhone’s speed returned to default after a battery replacement.

The company then introduced a cheaper battery replacement program as well as a new battery management setting that would let users disable throttling. All the while, Apple maintained the idea that it’s not slowing down devices to convince customers to replace older iPhones that may feel slower than before.

Apple – BGR

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iOS 11.3 causing problems with device management, fix for Jamf Pro coming

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Organizations trying to use Jamf Pro 10.3 to upgrade devices to iOS 11.3 are running into a glitch putting Apple products in a "failed loop," no longer responding to any further commands, Jamf has acknowledged.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

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Tesla’s latest Autopilot crash is just one of many problems it is now dealing with

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A fatal crash, production problems and now a recall.

Tesla is starting the second quarter in a defensive crouch:

  • Last week, the company revealed that Autopilot, its semi autonomous feature, was engaged during a recent fatal crash in California — its second confirmed Autopilot-related fatality in the U.S.
  • Tesla is struggling to meet its production goals for the Model 3, its first-ever mass-market car. Today, CEO Elon Musk reportedly said the company is producing 2,000 Model 3s a week — 500 short of his goal, which has been adjusted twice.
  • Last week, Tesla voluntarily recalled 123,000 of its Model S luxury sedans to fix a power-steering issue. That is a lot of cars — close to half of all the vehicles the company has produced.
  • Tesla stock is down about 36 percent since its September 2017 peak.

By the company’s own admission, this is a critical time for Tesla. The electric vehicle movement the company arguably popularized is seeing momentum from new and existing players, while self-driving competitors like Alphabet’s Waymo strike deals with automakers to develop vehicles that could rival Tesla’s own offerings. As both an automaker and a self-driving tech company, Tesla still has a lot to prove.

The crash

It’s not yet known whether Autopilot was at fault for 38-year-old Tesla driver Walter Huang’s death, but the simple fact that it was involved has put Tesla’s already fraught future — as well as the self-driving industry — at risk.

On March 23, Huang crashed his Model X into a median on a California highway while the SUV was operating in Autopilot mode. Tesla recovered the logs from the vehicle, and upon analyzing them said that the driver had received “several visual and one audible” cue to take back control of the car.

“The driver had about five seconds and 150 meters of unobstructed view of the concrete divider with the crushed crash attenuator, but the vehicle logs show that no action was taken,” the company wrote in a blog post.

This is the second U.S. crash of a Tesla confirmed to be operating Autopilot that has led to a fatality. The first was in Williston, Fla., in May 2016.

The National Transportation Safety Board, which is also investigating the March 23 crash, found that the first Autopilot-related fatality in 2016 was in part a result of the driver overrelying on Tesla’s semiautonomous software, but that Autopilot operated the way it was supposed to.

The NTSB’s investigation into this crash is ongoing, but the agency said that it was “unhappy” that Tesla revealed the details of the investigation to the public. The NTSB is also looking into reports that the driver previously complained about the performance of the Autopilot software.

Relatives of Huang said that he took his Tesla to the dealership because the software caused the car to swerve toward the highway barrier that his vehicle ultimately crashed into.

A Tesla spokesperson declined to comment on the NTSB’s comments but said they found no record of Huang bringing the vehicle into a dealership to service its Autopilot software.

“We’ve been doing a thorough search of our service records and we cannot find anything suggesting that the customer ever complained to Tesla about the performance of Autopilot,” a Tesla spokesperson said in a statement. “There was a concern raised once about navigation not working correctly, but Autopilot’s performance is unrelated to navigation.”

The fallout

The tragic death comes as both the industry and Tesla brace for the fallout from a recent fatality that involved an Uber-operated semi-autonomous vehicle in Tempe, Ariz.

The NTSB, along with local police and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, is also investigating the Uber crash, which resulted in the death of 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg.

Both crashes hit at a larger question many in the industry have: Is semi-autonomous technology safe?

With Uber and Tesla being two of the most prominent brands in the auto and tech industry working on some version of self-driving, consumer trust in the new technology could take a hit.

When it launched Autopilot, Tesla set the benchmark for the most advanced adaptive cruise control available in consumer vehicles. That technology has received multiple updates, and Musk has said he expects the second generation of the software to be capable of a high level of self-driving in about two years.

However, as it exists today, Autopilot is not intended to operate in all circumstances, and in fact is limited to highway driving. In other words, drivers need to be alert and ready to take over at all times — which creates an odd situation that is now clearly prone to failure.

That was also the case in Uber’s crash: The system relies on a trained operator to take over when the technology doesn’t work, though there are some important distinctions that need to be made between the two. For instance, Uber’s technology, which is still in development, is intended to operate on local roads with variables including pedestrians. Tesla’s Autopilot is only supposed to ease the highway-driving task.

Uber’s vehicles, however, are not available to the wider public, and are not being sold direct to consumers. Tesla, which says its technology is also still in beta, is putting its technology in the hands of consumers. Still, if either of the companies’ semiautonomous software is found to be at fault, there could be a resounding impact on consumer trust around self-driving.

“The consequences of the public not using Autopilot, because of an inaccurate belief that it is less safe, would be extremely severe,” Tesla wrote in a blog post. “There are about 1.25 million automotive deaths worldwide. If the current safety level of a Tesla vehicle were to be applied, it would mean about 900,000 lives saved per year.”

Production woes

Tesla’s voluntary recall of 123,000 Model S cars punctuated its ongoing struggles with meeting production goals of its mass-market vehicle, the Model 3.

The Model 3 is a significant barometer by which investors and the industry are measuring Tesla’s capability as an automaker. Can Tesla make the shift away from being just a luxury player to a mass-market carmaker at scale?

By Musk’s own admission, the early years of Tesla — from the Roadster to the Model X — were in service of laying the groundwork for building and selling a mass-market electric vehicle.

But the company has gotten off to a rough start in meeting the many ambitious goals Musk has set for the production of the vehicle.

In July 2017, Musk said that he aimed to produce 5,000 Model 3 vehicles per week by the end of 2017. The company then shifted that rate goal to 5,000 cars per week by the end of March 2018. But then in January, Musk lowered that goal to 2,500.

Today, Tesla is producing 2,000 Model 3s a week, according to emails obtained by Jalopnik.

“If things go as planned today, we will comfortably exceed that number over a seven-day period!” Musk wrote, referring to the current rate of production.

The company’s head of engineering also tried to rally the troops last week, saying the company needed to prove the “haters” wrong, as Bloomberg first reported.

“The world is watching us very closely, to understand one thing: How many Model 3s can Tesla build in a week?” Doug Field wrote. “This is a critical moment in Tesla’s history, and there are a number of reasons it’s so important. You should pick the one that hits you in the gut and makes you want to win.”

Recode – All

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Samsung Galaxy S9 battery life problems and what it means for Apple

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When done wrong, higher performance hurts power efficiency. When done right, power efficiency enables higher performance.

Lithium-ion batteries are getting a lot of attention these days. Everything from the Galaxy Note 7 recall to, yes, Apple’s discounted battery replacement program for older iPhones, means that it’s top of mind for many customers. So, it’s not surprising the Exynos version of Samsung’s Galaxy S9 is making headlines for its battery performance this week, and not in a good way.

From Yonhap News Agency:

The battery performance of Samsung Electronics Co.’s Galaxy S9 smartphone trailed behind rival products, industry watchers said Monday, causing consumers to express discontent.

From the same report:

Phone Arena, another industry tracker, also said in its report that the battery of the Galaxy S9 lasted 7 hours and 23 minutes in its test, which is an hour below the Galaxy S8’s 8 hours and 22 minutes. Apple Inc.’s iPhone X and LG’s V30 held comparable figures of 8 hours and 41 minutes and 9 hours and 34 minutes, respectively.

AnandTech tests were even more brutal:

The Exynos 9810 Galaxy S9 absolutely fell flat on its face in this test and posted the worst results among our tracking of the latest generation devices, lasting 3 hours less than the Exynos 8895 Galaxy S8. This was such a terrible run that I redid the test and still resulted in the same runtime.

Yonhap theorizes that Samsung Electronics has become more conservative about battery capacity, given the catastrophic failures consumers experienced with the Galaxy Note 7. But capacity alone is seldom, if ever, an issue, as Yonhap itself explains:

 “Although the battery’s capacity is also important, the phone’s optimization algorithm is very crucial,” an industry insider said. “The Galaxy S9 came with various new features, which possibly led to more stand-by power consumption. (Samsung) may have failed to develop power-saving algorithms properly.”

It’s possible there’s something going wrong at the system level that’s just burning power, even when it shouldn’t. That’s the best case scenario for everyone.

Otherwise, it’s a bigger problem, but one that’s probaly simpler than conservatism. At least partially. Samsung recently chose to care about single core performance. It’s something Apple has cared about and architected for for years. Samsung has obviously seen the advantage and is now making it a priority as well. But, drastically increasing single core performance has cost. Absent a dye shrink or previous generations being so inefficient that there was significant room for improvement, that cost is power consumption.

AnandTech put it this way:

This is such a terrible battery performance of the Exynos 9810 variant that it again puts even more clout into the new SoC. My theory as to why this happens is that not only do the higher frequency state require more energy per work done than competing SoCs – because this is a big CPU complex there’s also lots of leakage at play. The DVFS system being so slow might actually be bad for energy here as we might be seeing the opposite of race-to-sleep, walk-to-waste. The fact that Apple’s SoCs don’t have any issues with battery life in this test showcases that it’s not an inherent problem of having a high-power micro-architecture, but rather something specific to the Exynos 9810.

Also, this:

Unfortunately it feels like S.LSI keeps being one generation behind when it comes to efficiency – the A72 beating the M1, the A73 beating the M2 and now the A75 beating the M3. If you were to shift the microarchitectures one year ahead in Samsung’s favour then suddenly we would have had a much better competitive situation. What needs to happen with the M4 is a much larger efficiency boost to remain competitive with ARM’s upcoming designs and actually warrant the use of an internal CPU design team. Currently a 17-22% performance lead does not seem worth a 35-58% efficiency disadvantage along with the 2x higher silicon area cost.

The same feels like it applies to Samsung and Apple. Samsung perpetually feels a generation behind when it comes to efficiency.

Android Central‘s take:

That sort of battery performance is abysmal for a flagship phone like the Galaxy S9.

The truth is, hardware is tough. And silicon is especially tough.

Given infinite time, any good silicon team could design a system-on-a-chip that would achieve maximum performance at maximum efficiency up to the limits of known physics in our universe. Release schedules are the opposite of infinite time, though. You get a few years to plan, but you have to ship every year.

What Apple’s done to meet that demand is to establish a solid foundation and to build and iterate on it each and every year.

Apple A7 was the first 64-bit ARM chip in a phone. Apple A10 Fusion introduced paired efficiency and performance cores, so that reaching higher wouldn’t leave a gap beneath. Apple A11 Bionic increased the performance of the efficiency cores, while also introducing a neural engine and everything required to support Face ID. And all with at least the same, sometimes better battery life.

It’s not just a multi-year plan, it’s a multi-year investment.

To complicate matters, unlike Apple, Samsung has chosen to use two different chipsets for its phones: Exynos, which is made by Samsung’s silicon company, and Snapdragon, which is made by Qualcomm. It’s the Exynos version specifically that’s experiencing these problems.

With Apple and its consistent processor architecture per year per device, everything is a known quantity. This season’s iPhone X and iPhone 8, for example, all run on the same Apple A11 Bionic system-on-a-chip (SoC), on every carrier, in every region.

That means every component, from the rest of the hardware to all of the software, is a known quantity, and can work as part of an integrated whole to eek out as much performance while maintaining as much efficiency as possible.

Having two silicon targets just means, as opposed to infinite time, you have half the time to optimize for each.

Meanwhile, customers have come to expect phones that are faster and more battery efficient than ever. Oh, and lighter too.

(Internet experts love to talk about increasing battery size, but lightness is an incredibly important part of usability — never mind thermal insulation and RF interference, no one wants to buy the heaviest phone on the carrier shelf.)

Meeting and exceeding those expectations is a huge challenge. Pack a battery wrong and it burns. Boost performance wrong and it burns out.

But architect it right and the performance doesn’t come at the expense of the efficiency. The efficiency enables the performance.

Not everyone thinks about these things when buying a phone, or when arguing about specs on Twitter.

But it’s clear Apple is thinking about it deeply. And it shows in iPhone X, where the custom silicon drives everything from the machine learning-based biometrics to the display technology to the industry leading performance and, yes, the power efficiency that allows for extended battery life as well.

And it’s absolutely something consumers should think about not just when buying a phone but when investing in platform.

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The 9 Most Common iCloud Problems and How to Fix Them

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If you use Apple devices, such as an iPhone or iPad, and perhaps a Mac, then you’re probably using iCloud services as well. For those unaware, iCloud is Apple’s own cloud storage service, keeping your data safe in the cloud and easily accessible across multiple devices.

With iCloud, you can safely and securely store photos, videos, documents, mail, music, apps, and more, all right in the cloud. Data syncs quickly so everything stays up-to-date on your Apple devices.

For the most part, iCloud works fine, but you might encounter issues on occasion. We’re going to cover the most common iCloud problems and provide the solutions.

1. Cannot Connect to iCloud

iCloud Connection Error

The biggest step with iCloud is usually signing in. But sometimes that may fail, and you get the Cannot Connect to Server error message.

The first solution is to check the status of Apple’s servers, which you can do on the Apple status page. If it’s green, you’re good. A yellow or red light signifies issues or maintenance in progress, so you’ll have to wait it out.

Sometimes you may need to verify your iCloud account with updated terms and conditions to get it up and running again. This is an easy fix:

  1. Go to Settings > [Your Name] (at the top).
  2. If there’s any change in the Terms & Conditions, then it’ll pop up and prompt you to agree or disagree. Simply agree to verify your account.
  3. If you’ve changed your password for security reasons, then you may need to sign in with the new password to verify your account.

Another simple, but straightforward solution is to log out and log back in. This can work for your iCloud account, as well as your Apple ID for iTunes or the App Store.

  1. Go to Settings > [Your Name] > Sign Out. For iTunes and App Store, go to Settings > [Your Name] > iTunes & App Store.
  2. Select your account.
  3. Scroll to the bottom and click Sign Out for iCloud. For the Store, tap on your account and then Sign Out in the menu prompt.

If all else fails, you may need to use Recovery Mode on your iOS device.

2. iCloud Data Is Not Syncing

Apple ID Settings

While iCloud should sync automatically and changes appear instantly, sometimes that isn’t the case. If that happens, try these fixes in turn:

  1. Restart your device and wait. Sometimes all you need is patience.
  2. Make sure you’re logged in to the right account on all your devices. To check this, just go to Settings > [Your Name] on each iPhone or iPad.
  3. Again, make sure that Apple’s servers are working by checking the status page.

3. App Is Not Saving in iCloud

iCloud Data Sync

Usually apps that use iCloud Drive to store their data do so by default. However, sometimes you must manually toggle them to save to iCloud, either in the app settings or through a permission prompt. It’s easy to check and make sure this is on for the app you want:

  1. Go to Settings > [Your Name] > iCloud.
  2. Scroll through the list of apps and make sure that the toggle is green for the apps you want to save in iCloud.

4. Stuck on iCloud Signin or Updating iCloud Settings

Update iCloud Settings Stuck

If you’re trying to sign into iCloud on one device and it gets stuck, but Apple’s servers are functional and your credentials work on another device, then try a basic reboot:

  1. Turn off your phone by holding down the power button.
  2. Press the power button again until the Apple logo shows up.
  3. Re-enter your iCloud account information again in Settings.

If this happens when you’re in the Setup Assistant after updating or setting up a new device, and it asks to set up iCloud, then the restart should work too, or a hard restart. When you try it again, you can opt to skip setting up iCloud during the setup and do it later instead.

5. “Authentication Error” When Signing Into iCloud

Reset iCloud Password

Sometimes you think you have the right login credentials, but may have made a mistake somewhere along the way. If you get an “authentication failed” message when trying to sign in, try this:

  1. Go to appleid.apple.com.
  2. Log in with your Apple ID/iCloud credentials.
  3. If you still can’t log in, then try resetting your account password by clicking the Forgot Apple ID or password? link on the page.

6. “Unsupported Apple ID” When Signing Into iCloud

Apple ID Login

Creating your Apple ID is pretty straightforward. However, you may have created an Apple ID under non-standard circumstances, which can cause issues later.

Typically, if an Apple ID works with the iTunes Store, App Store, Game Center, FaceTime, and other Apple services, then it should work with iCloud. But if it doesn’t work with those services, there may be issues with using it for iCloud.

For this, Apple recommends to contact iCloud support to resolve the issue.

7. Reached or Exceeded iCloud Storage Limit

iCloud Delete Files

When you start using iCloud for everything, it can fill up pretty fast. After all, it can have backups of your iPhone and iPad, along with high-quality photos and videos, documents, and other data in iCloud Drive.

Apple gives everyone 5GB of iCloud storage for free. But that’s usually not enough, and a lot of users end up getting a message saying that they’ve reached or exceeded their iCloud storage limit. When this happens, you won’t be able to do daily backups or save more files in iCloud until you fix it. You have two options for this: make some space or buy more storage.

The first option involves checking your iCloud storage and getting rid of unnecessary data. To do this:

  1. Go to Settings > [Your Name] > iCloud. Tap on Manage Storage.
  2. You’ll see all apps and services storing in iCloud in descending order, sorted by largest amount of data.
  3. Tap on an item to view its contents and size.
  4. To get rid of something, just tap on the Delete Documents & Data (or something similar, depending on item) option.
  5. Wait a few moments while iCloud purges the selected data from your storage. Then you can celebrate, because you’ve regained space.

Purchase iCloud Storage

If you prefer not getting rid of anything, then consider buying more storage. It’s easy to do right from your iOS device:

  1. Go to Settings > [Your Name] > iCloud > Manage Storage.
  2. Select Change Storage Plan.
  3. You’ll see your current plan, along with available upgrades below.
  4. Apple’s iCloud plans start at $ 1 a month for 50GB, and go up to 2TB for $ 10 a month.
  5. Select the one you want, and then tap Buy. You’ll get charged immediately and the storage is available right away. The monthly payment date reflects your original purchase date.
  6. Apple charges your card charged every month until you cancel. If you had a paid plan before and needed an upgrade, Apple cancels the existing plan and charges the prorated cost for the new one.

8. Can’t Log In or Out of iCloud: “Verification Failed”

iCloud Verification Failed

If you’re trying to log in or out of your iCloud account in your iPhone or iPad’s Settings, but get a “Verification Failed” error message, there are a few ways to fix this:

  1. Do a hard reboot of your phone. See the link in the “Cannot Connect to iCloud” section above for detailed instructions.
  2. Make sure you’re connected to Wi-Fi. This is a common issue after updating your device’s software.
  3. Oddly enough, your device’s date and time may be incorrect, thus causing verification issues. Fix this by going to Settings > General > Date & Time. Make sure the Set Automatically option is on, and it should fix itself.
  4. Use another device that has the same Apple ID. Go to Settings > [Your Name] > Password & Security > Get Verification Code. This generates a six-digit code that you input on the other device (where you get verification error) if you have Two-Factor Authentication on.

9. iPhone Keeps Asking for iCloud Password

iCloud Password Error

This is an old bug, but one that pops back up at times. You’re in the middle of using your iPhone, when a prompt pops up asking you to enter your iCloud credentials. You do that, but then a few moments later, it pops up again, and again… What do you do?

  1. Rebooting your phone is the first step. Do it the traditional way with the power button, or use the hard restart method mentioned earlier.
  2. Sign out and back in to your iCloud account. Go to Settings > [Your Name] > Sign Out. When the prompt comes up, tap Delete from Phone. Then sign in again.
  3. Make sure Apple’s servers are working by checking the status page.
  4. If none of these steps work, try resetting your Apple account password at appleid.apple.com. Enter the new password in the prompt when it appears, and it should fix the problem.
  5. The last resort option is to back up and restore your device. Since this process can be time-consuming, make sure none of the other solutions worked for you.

iCloud Is Simple and Invisible… When It Works Right

Many Apple users rely on iCloud for at least something, if not everything. The service is seamless and invisible, but only when it works. When iCloud problems do come up, they make themselves quite apparent, leading to a frustrating experience.

We’ve covered some of the most common issues with iCloud here, but there are plenty of other annoying problems that can arise. However, when in doubt, it’s always good to try restarting your device to fix any strange problems you’re having before troubleshooting with Google.

Now that you know how to troubleshoot iCloud, check out our guide to fixing crashing iPhone apps.

Image Credit: SIphotography/Depositphotos

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How to fix iOS 11.3 and iPhone X battery life problems

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How do you fix battery life problems after updating to iOS 11.3 or upgrading to iPhone 8 or iPhone X? Here are our top power-saving tips!

Apple currently offers the standard iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, and the smaller iPhone SE. Between them, they’re rated for 10 to 12 hours of battery life while browsing the web, checking email, and chatting. But if you’ve just updated to iOS 11.3, or you’re upgrading to an iPhone 8 or iPhone X, you might see a serious drain on your battery power. Rather than cursing and throwing your iPhone — as much as you might want to! — here’s what you can do to fix battery life and get on with your life.

Wait for it

Whether you restore from backup or set up as new, your new iPhone or updated version of iOS 11 could expend up a lot of power downloading apps, games, mail, photos, and other content. That’s because the Wi-Fi radio stays on for a long time, and Spotlight — the iOS search system — has to index everything. Some apps rebuild their own libraries and databases as well. When radios and processors can’t sleep, power consumption goes way up.

If you’ve just upgraded to a new iPhone 8 or iPhone X, updated to iOS 11, or restored, give things a day or so to finish up and go back to normal. If you’re fine after that, great. If not, keep reading!

Test on standby

In addition to the system taking a while to really finish transferring everything over, we also tend to spend a long time playing with new phones and new features. That’s especially true with things like Animoji, Portrait Lighting, and Augmented Reality (AR) apps. So the screen stays on, storage gets written to, WI-Fi and maybe cellular radios stay lit up, and power gets consumed.

In other words, if you’re battery feels like it’s only lasting half as long, the first step to fixing it is figuring out if you’re using it twice as much.

So, note down how much battery life you have left. Then put your iPhone down for 20-40 minutes. When you pick it back up, note down how much battery life you have left again. If there isn’t a big change while in standby, you’re probably okay, and your battery life will return to normal when your usage returns to normal (after the novelty wears off).

If your iPhone continued to drain and drain fast, even when you weren’t using it, keep reading!

Reset

Rebooting, restarting, or resetting is the oldest cliche in troubleshooting. Because it works. Sometimes a good reset is all that’s needed to kick bad bits loose.

iPhone X and iPhone 8 require different button combos than previous iPhones:

  1. Quickly click and release the Volume Up button.
  2. Quickly click and release the Volume Down button.
  3. Press and hold the Side button (sleep/wake, on/off).

So does iPhone 7:

  1. Press and hold down the On/Off button on the right side
  2. While continuing to hold the On/Off button, press and hold the volume down button on the left side of your iPhone.
  3. Hold both buttons as the screen turns off, and keep holding them until the screen turns back on and displays the Apple logo.

For iPhone 6 and previous iPhones:

  1. Press and hold down both the Sleep/Wake button and the Home button at the same time.
  2. Keep them held down until you see an Apple logo.
  3. Let go.

On iPhone SE, and iPhone 5s and previous iPhones, the power button is located on the top:

Once your iPhone has rebooted, repeat the previous steps and see if battery drain has returned to normal. If not, keep reading!

Check usage

iOS contains a terrific battery usage — aka battery shaming — utility that lets you know exactly which apps and services are using your battery and how.

  1. Launch Settings from your Home screen.
  2. Tap on Battery. Wait a moment for Battery Usage to populate.

  3. Tap on the Show Detailed Usage button (looks like a clock) to get a breakdown of foreground and background power usage.
  4. Tap on Last 7 Days to get a broader look at power consumption over time.

It can be tricky to understand, but here’s the deal: If you see iCloud Photo Library there, and you’ve just upgraded, it’s a sign you’re downloading thumbnails and things should return to normal when you’re done. If you see Facebook there and it says 4% on screen and 40% on background, it’s a sign something has gone wrong.

At that point, you can force quit a rogue app and likely get your power consumption back to normal.

  1. Double click the Home button to bring up the fast app switcher.
  2. Swipe to the app you want to force quit.
  3. Touch the app card and flick it up and off the screen

On the iPhone X, you can force quit an app like this:

  1. Touch your finger to the gesture area at the bottom of the screen.
  2. Swipe up and hold your finger in place for a moment until the card-like multitasking interface appears.
  3. Tap and hold on the app you want to quit until the red circle with the “” symbol appears in the top left corner of the app.

  4. Flick the app up.
  5. Alternatively, tap the red circle.

If an app appears to be consistently misbehaving, you can try re-installing it or even switching to an alternative app or a service’s website for some of your activity.

Check battery health

With iOS 11, Apple has added Battery Health information. It reveals the current maximum capacity and peak performance capability, and will also inform you if your iPhone is being slowed down, whether it needs service, and will even allow you to turn off advanced power management — now called performance management — if you so choose.

  1. Launch Settings from your Home screen.
  2. Tap on Battery.
  3. Tap on Battery Health.

If your iPhone SE, iPhone 6, iPhone 6s, or iPhone 7 had been slowed down due to prevent an unexpected shutdown, iOS 11.3 will restore it to its previous, unmanaged performance levels. Performance management will only kick back in when and if you experience another unexpected shutdown. Until then, it’s a clean slate.

Peak performance capability is the ability of your iPhone’s battery to supply adequate charge even in the face of highly demanding tasks, up to and including those that cause power spikes.

Apple shows the following messages, depending on the capability to handle peak performance:

  • 100%: Your battery is currently supporting normal peak performance.
  • 95%: This iPhone has experienced an unexpected shutdown because the battery was unable to deliver the necessary peak power. Performance management has been applied to help prevent this from happening again. Disable…
  • 79% or less: Your battery’s health is significantly degraded. An Apple Authorized Service Provider can replace the battery to restore full performance and capacity. More about service options…
  • Unknown: This iPhone is unable to determine battery health. An Apple Authorized Service Provider can service the battery. More about service options…

If you disable performance management, you’ll see the following message:

This iPhone has experienced an unexpected shutdown because the battery was unable to deliver the necessary peak power. You have manually disabled performance management protections.

If your battery has poor health, you’ll want to make an appointment at an Apple Store or contact AppleCare to arrange a replacement.

Restore as new

Sometimes restoring from an old backup, especially a backup of a different device like an iPad, can be less than ideal. Cruft builds up and things just don’t run like they used to. Sometimes your once-fresh setup also goes stale.

If you suspect that’s the case, you can suck it up and set up your iPhone as new. Yes, it can be an incredible pain in the apps, but if you have a significant and continual problem, and nothing else can fix it, setting up as new can be a solution.

It’s the nuclear option, no doubt about it. You will have to set up almost everything again, including passwords and settings, and you will lose all your saved data like game levels, health, and activities, but in most cases, your battery life will be better than ever.

Battery cases and banks

If you need to go longer than the built-in battery in your iPhone will allow, one option is to get an external battery. You can either get a battery case or. a battery bank. A battery case keeps everything tightly packed together but limits the size and scope of the power source — it can’t be too big to fit in your pocket, and it typically can’t power other devices as well. A battery bank can come in all shapes and sizes and can often charge multiple devices, even at once.

I have both a battery case for my iPhone 7 and a battery bank with two charging ports for my iPhone 8 Plus, iPhone X, iPad Pro, and even USB-C MacBook Pro. They’ve both been lifesavers, especially when traveling. Here are some of iMore’s favorites:

Low Power Mode

If your battery life is normal but you want to get even more out of it, case or no case, you can use Low Power Mode. It turns off processes and otherwise conserves as much power as it can.

  1. Launch the Settings app from the Home screen.
  2. Tap Battery.
  3. Toggle Low Power Mode to on.

You can tell when Low Power Mode is enabled by looking at the color of the battery icon — it turns yellow. It will automatically turn off any time you recharge above 80% or more, so if you want to keep it on, you’ll need to switch it on every time.

You can also switch on Low Power Mode quickly by using Siri. Just say “Hey Siri, turn on low power mode!”

Note: On iPhone 8 and iPhone X, Low Power Mode also reduces the frequency of GPS updates,

If even Low Power mode isn’t enough — you’re stuck in the wilderness, at a conference with poor reception and no power — there are a few other hacks you can try.

  • Turn down the screen brightness.
  • Set Auto-Lock to 1 minute.
  • Use headphones instead of the speaker if you have to listen to audio or music.
  • Hide the Clock app in a folder. That animation uses GPU cycles. (Okay, silicon geeks only.)

Maintain good battery health

Batteries hate heat. It shortens their lifespans considerably. If it’s summer, try not to leave your iPhone lying in direct sunlight or in an extremely hot environment. If it’s winter, try not to leave your iPhone on a heater or in front of a hot air vent, even in your car.

If your iPhone gets too hot, it will gate itself by reducing screen brightness and otherwise trying to reduce power as much as possible — and, eventually, give you a heat warning and turn itself off to prevent damage. Don’t let it get that far.

Likewise, when you go to sleep at night, use a low power, slower charger. You can fast charge but doing so creates more heat and can reduce the long-term health of your battery. It’s fine to amp up the charge if you need to refill fast and get on with your day. But if you have the time take the time and let it charge at a normal speed.

Contact Apple

Every once and a while, you get a problem you just can’t solve. Like any electronics, sometimes things go wrong. If you have AppleCare or AppleCare+, you should absolutely book a Genius Bar appointment and avail yourself of it. If you don’t live close to an Apple Store, you can call 1-800-MY-APPLE in order to set up a mail-in repair.

More power saving tips!

If any of these power-saving tips worked for you, let me know! If you’ve got any tips of your own, let me know that too!

Updated January 2018: Updated new screenshots for checking battery usage and Low Power Mode. Also added instructions for force quitting apps on iPhone X.

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