No, postcards won’t solve our Russian interference problem

We just learned all the ways Russian propaganda agents fooled American social media companies, thanks to the recent indictments of Russian nationals by Team Mueller. After years of these companies forcing us to adhere to their contrived "community s…
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uTorrent Vulnerability Allow Attackers To Inject Malware, Fetch Download History, Here’s How To Fix The Problem

New uTorrent vulnerability 2018 allow attackers to inject malware in PCs and fetch their download history. Here’s how you can fix the problem.

[ Continue reading this over at RedmondPie.com ]

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Failure of Pixel 2 exposed a larger problem: Google’s ads don’t work

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Across 2017, Google heavily promoted its Pixel phone brand. Despite being lauded as being "the world’s most valuable brand" and its status as the world’s largest purveyor of advertising, all of Google’s global efforts, including DoubleClick and YouTube, resulted in inconsequential Pixel sales. Worse than its failure to sell hardware is the fact that Google has proven that its advertising simply isn’t very effective.
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It’s Great That Supermarkets Are Cutting Plastic Waste. But That’s Not Going to Solve the Problem.

Things that belong in the ocean: sharkscoral reefs, mermaids (well, they would if they were real, anyway). Things that don’t belong in the ocean: milk jugs, water bottles, plastic bags.

And yet we’re headed toward a future where our oceans contain more plastic than fish. If she actually existed, Ariel would be so disappointed in us.

She wouldn’t necessarily want to be part of our world, either. The situation up here on land isn’t any better: humans have a serious plastic addiction, and it’s wreaking havoc on our planet.

An Ocean of Plastic [Infographic]
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As supermarkets are one of the primary peddlers of this plastic waste, they’ve been an obvious target for those looking to crack down on it. A recent investigation by The Guardian found U.K. supermarkets produced 800,000 metric tons of plastic packaging waste every year. That alarming statistic has nudged at least a couple of chains toward taking action.

First, the British supermarket chain Iceland vowed to stop using plastic to package any of its own-brand products within five years (nice!). A few weeks later, Asda, another British chain, agreed to do the same – albeit on a much smaller scale (10 percent). The smaller goal shouldn’t be discounted though because Asda wants to achieve it on a much quicker timeline: within 12 months.

So, that’s progress, right? Eh. Maybe not.

“Asda’s pledge to slash plastic use is certainly very welcome — but why can’t it copy Iceland’s lead and ditch plastics from all its own-brand products?” asked Friends of the Earth waste campaigner Julian Kirby in an interview with The Guardian.

That’s a good question.

Tisha Brown’s criticism of Asda’s commitment was a bit more direct.

“A 10 percent reduction in own-brand products over one year doesn’t beat Iceland’s pledge,” the Greenpeace’s oceans campaigner told The Guardian. “If Asda applied the same tactic to reducing plastics as it does to competing on price, we’d be really impressed.”

Dang. Which aisle do you keep the burn cream in, Asda?

Really, it’s hard to fault anyone from responding to Asda’s pledge with an eye roll. Did they not get the memo about plastic outweighing fish in our oceans? Drastic times call for drastic measures, and a 10 percent reduction isn’t anywhere near drastic enough.

The post It’s Great That Supermarkets Are Cutting Plastic Waste. But That’s Not Going to Solve the Problem. appeared first on Futurism.

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