Samsung Odyssey Z is a 15.6″ gaming laptop with a GTX 1060, 6-core i7

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Samsung occasionally dabbles in gaming laptops and here’s the latest one – the Samsung Odyssey Z. It’s fairly thin and light for a gaming laptop, but will run cool thanks to Z AeroFlow cooling system with a Z Blade Blower. This is a 15.6″ laptop (1080p screen) with a 6-core Intel Core i7 (8th gen) and an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 Max-P (which is apparently 10% faster than a 1060 Max-Q). The laptop can be configured with up to 16 GB of DDR4 RAM and up to 1TB NVMe SSD, the GPU has 6 GB of GDDR5 memory. The Samsung Odyssey Z gaming laptop uses a vapor chamber and two blower fans for…

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Samsung Notebook Odyssey Z Gaming Laptop with 15.6-inch Full HD display, GeForce GTX 1060 graphics, 16GB RAM announced

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Samsung Electronics today announced Notebook Odyssey Z Gaming Laptop with 15.6-inches 1080p display, up to 6GB GeForce GTX 1060 GPU, up to 16GB RAM. It comes with thermal management hardware; an in-built Z AeroFlow Cooling System consists of three key components; the Dynamic Spread Vapor Chamber, the Z AeroFlow Cooling Design and the Z Blade Blower. It is powered by the 8th generation Intel Core i7 processor with 6 cores and 12 threads and supports latest DDR4 memory with a bandwidth of 2,400 MHz. The Notebook comes with a refined keyboard with Crater Keycaps that deliver improved precision and comfort and the new Touchpad design, which is located to the side for a more desktop-like feel. It also comes with silent mode option to focus on what you do with the fan noise able to reach as low as 22 decibels. The Dynamic Spread Vapor Chamber covers both GPU and CPU from edge to edge for optimal heat management; the Vapor Chamber is aided by Z AeroFlow Cooling Design, to efficiently push cold air to the hottest parts of the device above and below simultaneously, while pushing out heat air from the vents. Samsung Notebook Odyssey Z Gaming Laptop specifications 15.6-inch (1920 x 1080 pixels) Full HD display 8th Gen …
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Tech Deals: Rare $20 Discount On Apple HomePod, $9 iPhone 8 Plus Case, $10 Off Mario Odyssey For Nintendo Switch, More

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Technology and new products are always better when you don’t have to pay full price in order to own them. In fact, that really goes for any form of shopping. The bigger the discount, the sweeter the purchase. As always, our daily tech deals are designed to ensure that you simply do not need to pay full price in order to get some new gadgetry or tech-based hardware in your life.

[ Continue reading this over at RedmondPie.com ]

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This replica of HAL-9000 from 2001: A Space Odyssey comes with Amazon’s Alexa built in

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HAL-9000, the malevolent supercomputer at the heart of Stanley Kubrick’s classic 2001: A Space Odyssey, is an icon of science fiction cinema. So much so, that if you ask any one of the virtual assistants to “Open the pod bay doors,” they’ll dutifully parrot HAL’s lines from the movie back at you. Now, Master Replicas Group wants to take that step a bit further, turning HAL into a virtual assistant that can control your home.

The company name might be familiar to prop and costume fans: the original Master Replicas produced a range of high-quality props from franchises like Star Wars and Star Trek before going out of business a decade ago. If you’ve seen someone swinging around a lightsaber, there’s a good chance it’s one of Master…

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Alto’s Odyssey Review

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The original Alto’s Adventure, launched three years ago, was an unmitigated success. Players loved the simple yet exciting gameplay, wonderful visuals and a soothing soundtrack, resulting in millions of copies being sold across multiple platforms. Three years later, developer Team Alto is back with a sequel. Called Alto’s Odyssey, the game has similar gameplay style to the original but with a few new twists and a brand new setting. It’s now out on iOS and we decided to take a look. Unlike the snow covered peaks of Alto’s Odyssey, you slide down sand covered dunes in a desert in…

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Review: ‘Alto’s Odyssey’ for iOS heads down the mountain as an excellent sequel to ‘Alto’s Adventure’

Article Image

"Alto’s Odyssey" makes a number of enhancements to the successful formula set out by "Alto’s Adventure" three years ago, resulting in an endless runner that will satisfy both players of the original and newcomers alike.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

‘Alto’s Odyssey’ developers tout economics and ease of development for Apple devices

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The developers of "Alto’s Odyssey" have skewed toward supporting Apple’s iPhone and iPad for several reasons, above all ease of development, a new interview reveals.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

‘Alto’s Odyssey’ Review: Once More Down the Mountain

Snowman returns to their breakout hit with Alto’s Odyssey [$ 4.99], and while they don’t veer too far from what worked in Alto’s Adventure [$ 4.99], they still find room for a few surprises while maintaining the engrossing atmospheric experience of the original. It doesn’t do enough new to change the minds of anyone that didn’t like the first game, but everything Adventure does right, Odyssey expands on it.

If you’ve played the heck out of Alto’s Adventure, you need to be patient. The game seems very similar at first. If you haven’t, well, you control Alto or one of several other characters on a sandboard as they go through desert environments. Yes, sandboarding is a real thing, and it’s awesome. You can tap and hold on the screen to perform backflips, and you need to land your flips safely in order to not crash. Land a flip, and you’ll gain a speed boost. Chain together a bunch of tricks, such as multiple flips and grinds, and you’ll get even bigger boosts. You can’t flip forward, so if you need to correct your position, you need to let go and hope you land cleanly on your board. Timing your flips is crucial to success in Alto’s Odyssey.

Part of the hook for Alto’s Adventure was that it was a backflipping endless runner like Ski Safari [$ 0.99] but really beautiful. And Alto’s Odyssey manages to one-up Adventure in terms of creating a gorgeous atmosphere. The desert environments are stunning, and the biomes that the game introduces all come with their own elements to differentiate them, and provide a unique flavor to each run. You might wind up in one biome for a few runs, before you eventually start to end up in other biomes, and it all feels rather natural. The storms and day-night cycle add variety to each run, and create for some gorgeous worlds. If you want to just enjoy the landscapes without fear of failure, you can just play the Zen Mode, and pick back up whenever you crash.

The new movement mechanic (which I’m not going to spoil because a large part of the game’s fun is in discovering things for yourself) adds a great new aspect to chaining together tricks, and in developing and maintaining speed throughout your runs. That’s the greatest strength for Alto’s Odyssey: the sense of feeling like your exploring a new world, not always knowing what you’re going to get next. I do like that the elder from Alto’s Adventure returns in a sense in Alto’s Odyssey, but lasts a much shorter amount of time.

Because of the multiple playable characters, I say the game should be more appropriately called Maya’s Odyssey, because she remains the superior character in the Alto franchise. Sure, she doesn’t pick up speed as quickly, but that’s not the key problem in the game, successfully landing backflips is a lot tougher. I suppose I understand that it teaches players to learn how to to backflip and to make smart decisions. But the game just gets to be a lot less frustrating with Maya and her ability to flip quicker than Alto can. If anything, I’d say that it’s easier to pick up speed with her because you can make more backflips with Maya than you can with Alto. But it also comes down to taste, I suppose. But much like in Alto’s Adventure, I find my self sticking with Maya. Of course, maybe Alto or one of the other characters you unlock is more your speed.

I wish the game awarded coins more quickly, because I’d like to buy the wingsuit earlier on than it is available. In fact, it feels like it’s quite possible to out-progress the game to a certain extent, and then it becomes about the grind to get more coins to unlock the wingsuit. I understand that the revival items are expensive, but they feel prohibitively expensive. The wingsuit is such a fun and unique part of the Alto experience, and I wish it was a bit more accessible to unlock. This is where other games include IAP for more coins, and I’m not going to lie, I’d have paid to unlock the wingsuit faster.

While I felt this way in Alto’s Adventure to some extent, the problem is that Alto’s Odyssey follows a lot of the same notes that the first game did. The new things it introduces are welcome, but I feel like this won’t change anyone’s opinion on the series, but it will make fans happy. There are still surprises to be had, but the idea that you can guess what’s next, or feel familiarity at something new, is just a little disappointing.

Snowman gave Alto’s Odyssey the full complement of iOS features, including iCloud support and Apple TV compatibility. The game works really well with the Siri Remote, and it’s nice to just sit back on the couch and play the game that way, versus holding up an iPhone or iPad.

Still, I think Snowman knows how to make a fantastic backflipping endless runner. The atmosphere is second to none, the physics do require an acclimation period but they feel fantastic over time. And the way that the game progresses and introduces new elements makes it a compelling experience to play over time, even if I wish it went a bit faster, or was more generous with the coins. And hey, a premium game without in-app purchases is a unicorn on the App Store, I’m sure there’s people wanting me to shut up about saying I’d spend money on coins.

If you liked Alto’s Adventure and want more of it, pick up Alto’s Odyssey. If you never played Alto’s Adventure and want an incredibly beautiful endless runner with intriguing progression systems, get Alto’s Odyssey. If you didn’t feel great about Alto’s Adventure, I doubt Alto’s Odyssey does enough new things to change your mind.

TouchArcade

Alto’s Odyssey, UniChar, and other awesome apps of the week

A brilliant sandboarding endless runner that’s sure to go down as one of this year’s greatest iOS games is just of one of the picks for this week’s “Awesome Apps of the Week.” In addition, we’ve got a great Unicode app for iOS, a gambling-centric version of Angry Birds, and a significant update to one […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)

Cult of Mac

TouchArcade Game of the Week: ‘Alto’s Odyssey’

The idea behind the TouchArcade Game of the Week is that every Friday afternoon we post the one game that came out this week that we think is worth giving a special nod to. Now, before anyone goes over-thinking this, it doesn’t necessarily mean our Game of the Week pick is the highest scoring game in a review, the game with the best graphics, or really any other quantifiable “best” thing. Instead, it’s more just us picking out the single game out of the week’s releases that we think is the most noteworthy, surprising, interesting, or really any other hard to describe quality that makes it worth having if you were just going to pick up one.

These picks might be controversial, and that’s OK. If you disagree with what we’ve chosen, let’s try to use the comments of these articles to have conversations about what game is your game of the week and why.

Without further ado…

 

Alto’s Odyssey

It’s hard to believe that it’s been three years since the original Alto’s Adventure [$ 4.99] launched in the App Store, becoming an unexpected mainstream success and thrusting developer Snowman into the spotlight. Ever since then people have been asking about a sequel, but due to all of their success Snowman was able to enter the publishing realm in addition to their own upcoming projects and as such have been quite busy these past three years. Well, at long last that sequel, Alto’s Odyssey [$ 4.99], arrived in the App Store this week almost three years to the day from the launch of the original. Here’s a brief excerpt from our review.

…Alto’s Odyssey manages to one-up Adventure in terms of creating a gorgeous atmosphere. The desert environments are stunning, and the biomes that the game introduces all come with their own elements to differentiate them, and provide a unique flavor to each run. You might wind up in one biome for a few runs, before you eventually start to end up in other biomes, and it all feels rather natural. The storms and day-night cycle add variety to each run, and create for some gorgeous worlds. If you want to just enjoy the landscapes without fear of failure, you can just play the Zen Mode, and pick back up whenever you crash.

…The new movement mechanic (which I’m not going to spoil because a large part of the game’s fun is in discovering things for yourself) adds a great new aspect to chaining together tricks, and in developing and maintaining speed throughout your runs. That’s the greatest strength for Alto’s Odyssey: the sense of feeling like your exploring a new world, not always knowing what you’re going to get next. I do like that the elder from Alto’s Adventure returns in a sense in Alto’s Odyssey, but lasts a much shorter amount of time.”

The launch of Alto’s Odyssey has been surprisingly mixed, with one of the big criticisms being that it’s not different enough from the original. I think that criticism is valid in so much that if you didn’t enjoy the first Alto, there’s probably not anything here that’s going to change your mind. However, for fans of the first game, this is what you love but bigger and better in every way. When it comes to making a game that you will constantly just stop to marvel at its beauty, Snowman is unmatched with their Alto games. That also means the original is still worth keeping around, as it offers an aesthetically different experience that’s still a joy to return to. But Alto’s Odyssey is better in every way, and whether you’re ready for more or you’re new altogether this is one that will become a permanent addition to your device happily living alongside its older sibling.

TouchArcade