Huawei hops on the mesh network bandwagon with the WiFi Q2

At CES 2018, Huawei announced its new home network/router solution, the WiFi Q2. Although similar to other products on the market, like Google’s or Netgear’s offerings, the WiFi Q2 differs slightly in that it’s “the world’s first” hybrid system for blanketing your home in wireless signal.

Combining a “unique G.hn” 1Gbps powerline connection (PLC) with a mesh system (1,867Mbps backhaul and load balance support), Huawei is hoping to reduce the amount of dead areas in your coverage.

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Huawei hops on the mesh network bandwagon with the WiFi Q2 was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Linksys unveils a cheaper version of its WiFi mesh router

Last year at CES, router specialist Linksys revealed its take on home mesh networking. Each tri-band 'Velop' tower could serve as a router, range extender, access point and bridge, giving you ultra-fast connectivity in every corner of your home. The…
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Mesh WiFi startup Eeros lays off a fifth of its workforce

Mesh WiFi pioneer Eero has laid off 30 employees in a bid to "focus on its core business". The company, which launched in 2015, has played a pivotal role in changing the face of home WiFi with products that blanket spaces in coverage, designed to rep…
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Netgear announces outdoor satellite for its Orbi mesh router system

Having a single router in your home is so 2015. Everyone is doing this mesh router thing now, which means you have two or more access points in order to provide better coverage. Netgear is looking to take its mesh router beyond the confines of your indoor space with the new Orbi outdoor satellite. While it’s not supposed to be “official” until CES next week, Netgear has made all the details available.

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Netgear announces outdoor satellite for its Orbi mesh router system was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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The web is dying, but mesh networks will save it


My previous article, The web began dying in 2014, here’s how, raised much more awareness than I thought it would. Many people found it to be an insightful analysis of the web under the control of tech giants, but the article ended without providing anything positive to hold on to. I actually have hope for the web. There are legitimately viable ways of preserving freedom on the web while taking the platform forward and keeping it competitive against proprietary alternatives from tech giants. But it can only happen if the web takes a courageous step towards its next level. If it…

This story continues at The Next Web
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