These termite-hunting ants lick the severed legs of their friends to treat them

Termite-hunting ants in sub-Saharan Africa treat each other’s wounds by licking them, according to new research. It might sound icky — but the treatment actually saves lives.

The ant, called Megaponera analis, specializes in raiding termite nests. These hunts, however, are dangerous: The ants can lose legs or antennas, and sometimes they die. A study last year showed that the ants rescue their injured friends in the battlefield, taking them back to the nest. Now, researchers have shown what exactly happens in the nest after those rescue operations. In hour-long sessions, healthy ants take turns licking the injured mate’s severed legs, treating the open wounds. And that reduces mortality by 70 percent, possibly by fighting off infections,…

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US product safety commission warns that fidget spinners explode, so don’t lick them

Fidget spinners have exploded onto the gadget scene over the past few months — not just in the growth sense of the word, but quite literally. That’s why the US Consumer Product Safety Commission today released guidelines for both manufacturers and consumers on how to have a safe time around fidget spinners, particularly ones that contain metal and / or batteries.

For consumers, the CPSC recommends that fidget spinner users avoid playing with them around their faces or putting them in their mouths. It also recommends not letting children under the age of three play with a fidget spinner. When it comes to battery-operated fidget spinners, the CPSC suggests users should be monitoring the device when it’s charging, specifically noting that…

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