Mark Zuckerberg says he is a ‘power user of the internet’

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg held a call with reporters today to answer questions about the sweeping changes the company made to its third-party app developer platform, as well as the revelation that as many as 87 million users — not 50 million as previously thought — may have had their personal data misused by Cambridge Analytica.

Slate’s Will Oremus asked whether the chief executive himself would have used apps like the one designed by Cambridge psychology professor Aleksandr Kogan, called “thisisyourdigitallife,” that siphoned the data of around 270,000 users and all of their friends, which Kogan then packaged and sold.

The CEO’s answer was candid and will likely enter the pantheon of iconic Zuck quotes, which also includes his…

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At $27 billion, Spotify is the seventh-most-valuable internet company to go public in the U.S.

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It’s up there with Google, if you don’t adjust for inflation.

Spotify’s public offering is not only notable because of its uncommon choice to list its shares directly on the stock market. The stock, which began trading today, also ranks among the most valuable internet companies to list in the U.S.

Its closing market value today was about $ 27 billion, according to Dealogic, putting it ahead of Twitter and Groupon, but behind Alibaba, Facebook, Snap and Google following their first trading days. That’s despite a stock price decline of about 11 percent today.

Spotify is also the most valuable tech IPO since Snap went public last year, closing its first day at nearly $ 29 billion. Spotify had the 25th-biggest first-day closing market cap out of companies in all sectors, according to Dealogic’s data, which goes back to 1995 and is not adjusted for inflation.


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South Africa has an untouched $10M fund for internet accessibility

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A new report has revealed that South Africa has $ 10 million sitting unspent in Universal Service and Access Funds meant to for the provisioning of Internet access in the country. The report, Universal Service and Access Funds: An Untapped Resource to Close the Gender Digital Divide, Furthermore, the report (published by the Web Foundation, the Alliance for Affordable Internet, and UN Women) states that many governments in Afrika are failing to take action to connect women and other offline populations — despite the existence of funds earmarked for this purpose. This at a time when affordability is a major barrier to women being able to access…

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Cloudflare launches 1.1.1.1 DNS service that will speed up your internet

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Cloudflare is launching its own consumer DNS service today, on April Fools’ Day, that promises to speed up your internet connection and help keep it private. The service is using https://1.1.1.1, and it’s not a joke but an actual DNS resolver that anyone can use. Cloudflare claims it will be “the Internet’s fastest, privacy-first consumer DNS service.” While OpenDNS and Google DNS both exist, Cloudflare is focusing heavily on the privacy aspect of its own DNS service with a promise to wipe all logs of DNS queries within 24 hours.

DNS services are typically provided by internet service providers to resolve a domain name like Google.com into a real IP address that routers and switches understand. It’s an essentially part of the internet,…

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Opinion: The Visual Internet of Things – why IoT needs visual data

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OPINION James Wickes, CEO and co-founder of Cloudview, explains why visual data is an untapped resource for smart analytics within many IoT projects.

iob new conectionsNEW CONNECTIONS

An occasional series of vendor perspectives on the world of connected business – because it’s all about making new connections and starting new conversations.

We are constantly reading about IoT developments, but these rarely include visual data – which is strange, because sight is our most powerful sense and we are surrounded by digital cameras. However, much of the visual data currently collected is stored locally and only used for a single purpose, while a huge percentage is never used at all. Combining this with other IoT data streams and adding analytics would make it immensely valuable.

The volumes of visual data available are eye-watering. Looking at CCTV alone. In 2015, the British Security Industry Association estimated that there were between four and six million security cameras in the UK. Our own research suggests there are now around 8.2 million. Even six million cameras recording 12 hours a day would capture 72 million hours of footage every day, producing 7.5 petabytes of visual data every hour.

Analytics and visual data: a formidable pairing

Applying analytics to visual data is complex. However, we now have the processing power, bandwidth, data storage capacity, and computing ability to enable fast, reliable analysis to a standard that makes it commercially viable. McKinsey expects video analytics to experience a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of over 50 percent over the next five years.

Adding analytics and cloud storage to cameras provides the ability to spot anomalies that we are unable to identify with our own eyes. For example, in health and well-being alone there are many opportunities, such as:

• A camera trained on a patient in a hospital with the right analytics can now spot irregular breathing or an irregular pulse.
• Cameras are being used in care situations to monitor individuals to ensure they are being well-treated (with appropriate permissions).
• Qualified health and social care professionals are able to review footage for safeguarding purposes, and this can prove popular with both residents and staff.

Building the VIoT

The next step is to combine visual data with other data sets – from static data, such as grid references, to dynamic data, such as weather information.

This will create a vast new market – the Visual IoT (VIoT).  In other words, the integration of visual data into a uniform, IP-based data stream, combined with the capabilities and functions of a network of physical objects and devices.

In this way, cameras can be turned into super-charged sensors providing data that can then be acted upon, such as identifying that a car with a certain numberplate is allowed to enter a given area, which automatically opens the gate.

The potential is huge, and could revolutionise traffic management, and the reporting of crimes or accidents. For example, when an individual with a VIoT device enters a certain area, by previous agreement their data could be aggregated with that of others to create an accurate picture of an event.

For a motorway accident, combining data from road cameras and in-vehicle routing systems would pinpoint the precise location and help first responders to arrive more quickly. Meanwhile, adding visual data from drivers’ dashcams (with permission) could add unique views of the area around an incident.

Combining visual data with analytics can provide insight into both what is happening and why things happen, together with the ability to anticipate what might happen next.

Consider the control centres used by emergency services to monitor cameras in city centres. Adding analytics and machine intelligence would enable them to identify impending problems and send resources to defuse a situation before it escalates. The same process could identify potential risky or suspicious behaviour at transport hubs and other public spaces.

There is also tremendous potential for smart city initiatives that use existing camera data to improve the local environment. For example, NVIDIA is developing an intelligent video analytics platform for smart cities, which will apply deep learning techniques to video streams. Applications include public safety, traffic management, and resource optimisation.

Safeguarding privacy and GDPR

The big issue, of course, is privacy, but technologies such as facial and behaviour recognition can be used to reduce human involvement to a minimum. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) provides additional protection, as it includes provisions for how visual data is collated and used in applications that apply AI, analytics, and deep learning techniques to that data. There are also applications in sectors such as the environment that will not involve individuals at all.

Provisions such as privacy by design, Privacy Impact Assessments, and the appointment of a data protection officer will be mandatory for public authorities and any organisation whose core activities require regular and systematic monitoring of data subjects on a large scale. There are also applications in sectors such as the environment that will not involve individuals at all.

By providing information that is not available in any other way, visual data will enable the IoT to bring even more benefits to all our lives. More information is available in the white paper Visual IoT: where the IoT, cloud and big data come together.

Internet of Business says: This opinion piece and the link to an external white paper have both been provided by Cloudview, and not by our independent editorial team.

The post Opinion: The Visual Internet of Things – why IoT needs visual data appeared first on Internet of Business.

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The Morning After: SpaceX satellite internet and ‘No Man’s Sky’ on Xbox

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Hey, good morning! You look fabulous. It's Friday, and we're celebrating the FCC's approval of SpaceX's satellite internet plan. Also, we've got all the new Apple updates and a new Westworld trailer from HBO.
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FCC approves SpaceX plan for satellite-provided internet

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The SpaceX plan for a global wireless internet network provided by 4,425 satellites has been approved by the FCC. The $ 10 billion Starlink proposal calls for the satellites to launch in two phases between 2019 and 2024, then fly between 714 and 823 m…
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FCC approves SpaceX’s ambitious satellite internet plans

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The Federal Communications Commission today granted SpaceX a license to operate an array of broadband internet satellites, marking the first time the government agency has given the green light for a US-licensed low-Earth orbit broadband service. SpaceX co-founder and CEO Elon Musk has been discussing a micro-satellite constellation for providing broadband internet for years, and in 2017 the company began accelerating its efforts by meeting regularly with the FCC and applying for a license that would allow it to operate in an unused portion of the FCC-regulated broadband spectrum. The company plans to call the service Starlink.

Earlier this year, SpaceX launched the first two of its planned 12,000-satellite constellation. It appears…

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A man who once tried to marry his laptop now wants to pull the plug on internet porn

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After being denied the right to marry his laptop not once but three times, an army veteran has a new target for in sight: internet porn. Chris Sevier’s putting personal pleasure aside — an admittedly challenging endeavor, given his history — and throwing his admittedly laughable reputation behind lobbying for legislation that would tax internet users for viewing porn on connected devices. The Electronic Frontier Foundation tracked comparable proposals across the country, revealing we could see about two dozen similar bills in 18 state legislatures this year. So far, none have passed. Each is slightly different, but offers the same…

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The Internet Made Everyone a Medical Expert, and Patients Are Worse for It

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Admit it, you’ve done it: you notice a strange ache or a bump where there wasn’t one before, so you run to the internet. In mere minutes, you’re convinced you have cancer, or a parasite, or a rare disease that was only seen one time on the other side of the world. Even when your doctor tells you it’s just a rash and you shouldn’t worry about it, you can’t help but wonder: is she sure?

Turns out, that sort of self-diagnosis does more than just stress you out — it has lasting repercussions on medicine as a whole. Patients who’ve spent too much time on WebMD are pressuring doctors into over-prescribing antibiotics, which in turn has bolstered the rise of antibiotic resistance.

According to Wiredheath care workers say they worry about bad patient satisfaction and negative reviews online creates a “Yelp effect,” which drives doctors to make decisions based on what patients want instead of, you know, actual medicine.

And it seems patients expect antibiotics: a 2016 study of a large group of medical records showed that a third of antibiotics prescriptions were written for viral infections, which, as you might know, do not respond to antibiotics.

“Providers believe — whether it’s accurate or not — that there is a business reason, in terms of customer satisfaction, patient retention, to give patients what they want,” David Hyun, a pediatric infectious disease physician who recently directed a review of why doctors mis-prescribe antibiotics, told Wired. “We frequently hear providers say, ‘If I don’t give the antibiotics, the patient will go across the street, to urgent care or another primary care practice, and get them there.’”

Wired reports that the problem has gotten so bad that there’s even a petition on Change.org, by the organization Physicians Working Together, asking Yelp to remove negative reviews of doctors.
Hyun’s research suggested there are lots of other reasons that doctors might improperly prescribe, like being worn out at the end of the day (when doctors tend to prescribe antibiotics more often).But of all the squeaky wheels in medicine, whiney patients seem like the easiest to fix.
And then there’s the role of the internet, which seems to be misleading an awful lot of would-be patients — a 2013 study from the Pew Research Center found that 35 percent of American adults had used the internet to diagnose themselves or someone they knew. (That number has likely risen since then, as more and more people become connected to the web.)
There’s certainly nothing wrong with checking out a simple symptom to quell your paranoia. But in the same way you know not to blindly believe every headline that screams about latest food that causes cancer, it’s ultimately the doctor who has gone through an average of 14 years (in the U.S.) of training to decide whether or not you have anything wrong with you. Or if you even need that antibiotic you saw on WebMD.
So, be an adult. Don’t leave nasty Yelp reviews for doctors that don’t give you what you want. Not taking antibiotics when you don’t need them could one day save lives.

The post The Internet Made Everyone a Medical Expert, and Patients Are Worse for It appeared first on Futurism.

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