Quika promises free satellite internet for developing countries

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Internet of Things in Healthcare: What are the Possibilities and Challenges?

Internet of Things in Healthcare

Technology has disrupted every industry including healthcare, business, finance and others. Healthcare remains the fastest to adopt technological changes to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of the body. When we talk about the Internet of Things (IoT), it offers a multitude of benefits such as improving the effectiveness and quality of services by deploying it in medical devices.

Have a look at few of the statistics revealing the use of IoT in healthcare and the overall impact on the industry.

  • Nearly 60% of healthcare organizations have introduced IoT devices into their facilities
  • 73% of healthcare organizations use IoT for maintenance and monitoring
  • 87% of healthcare organizations plan to implement IoT technology by 2019 which is slightly higher than the 85% of businesses across various industries
  • Nearly 64% use of IoT in the healthcare industry is patient monitors
  • 89% of healthcare organizations have suffered from IOT related security breach

It has a widely known that interconnected devices are being used in such ways as gathering data from fetal monitors, blood glucose levels, electrocardiograms and temperature monitors. However, some of these tools require follow up communication with a healthcare specialist.

Moreover, the majority of hospitals have invested in introducing smart beds to determine whether it’s occupied or not. When we talk about the Internet of Things, there are concerns regarding the data privacy and security. However, it doesn’t matter as far everyone is getting the right treatment, and the patients and doctors work in complete harmony.

How healthcare industry can harness the power of IoT and set the stage for highly accessible, personalized and on-time healthcare services for everyone. Have a look at it.

Cutting Cost through Remote Health Monitoring

The number one benefit of adopting IoT in a healthcare organization is cost reduction. Healthcare specialists can take advantage of remote health monitoring without the patient being present in the hospital. No matter, whether the patient is at home, in the office or some other part of the world, healthcare specialists can monitor the patient’s health and provide recommended treatments.

Thus, it can reduce the workload of healthcare providers who can’t bear the flooding of patients each day. Moreover, the shortage of staff at medical health centers would never disrupt the checkup of patients. IoT can also be helpful in third world countries where health facilities are inaccessible. It can also be useful in areas hit by flood, earthquake, tsunami or hurricane. Overall, the impact of this technology will offer better health facilities, no longer specific to particular regions but globally.

Collecting and Understanding Medical Data

During a patient’s stay, they are tangled in medical devices including heart monitors, blood pumps, respirators, and IVs. However, the operation and recording of information from these devices take a lot of time and are prone to errors on behalf of caregivers.

Today, with IoT a patient’s data can be conveyed through Electronic Health Record systems automatically. This method helps in increasing the accuracy of data and allows nurses to spend more time providing care.

On the other hand, doctors have to interpret data to decide the cure for patients. Due to the increase of medical devices, it can be challenging for doctors to come up with a proper diagnosis. For this, an IoT solution can be used to support health practitioners while combining IoT data from a multitude of medical devices and gain insights about patient’s health, without scattering the information.

Patient Monitoring

The evolution of wearable health gadgets like the Apple iWatch has begun playing a pivotal role in the monitoring of an individual’s health. Still, these products are sometimes not as accurate compared to general medical equipment.

On the other hand, wearable IoT devices can analyze and detect different health points such as blood pressure, heartbeat, brainwaves, temperature, physical position, footsteps and breathing patterns. With the help of data collected through IoT devices, doctors can share their feedback and give general suggestions in the case of an emergency.

Although, the IoT is revolutionary in the healthcare sector, there are few challenges as well that needs to be kept in mind. Have a look at them.

Challenges of IoT in Healthcare

Security Threats

The primary concern for regulatory bodies is the security of Personal Health Information, stored and conveyed through connected devices. While many healthcare organizations make sure that the sensitive data is stored in a secure and encrypted manner, they do not have control over the safety and security of the data access points being used to transmit the data. This creates a significant threat that increases gradually based on the number of new devices connected to the network.

Multiple Device Integration

Multiple device integrations is also an obstacle to the successful deployment of IoT in healthcare. Today most health devices and equipment within hospitals need to be connected to collect data of the patient. For instance, if a person is suffering from heart disease, he/she may be suffering from high blood pressure as well.

The most prominent challenge is that device manufacturers have not agreed upon set of protocols and standards. As various mobile devices are connected to the network for the collection of data, the difference in protocols results in complicating the process of grouping the information. The lack of homogeneity among the medical devices reduces the successful implementation of IoT in healthcare.

Inferring Results from Immense Data

The process of aggregating and collecting data is attached to many complexities. Though the combined data results can help in deriving new conclusions inferred from the patient’s record. However, coming up with the results from such a significant amount of data is quite challenging, without refined analytics program and data experts.

Identifying valuable and actionable data is critical as most of the medical specialists and physicians find it difficult to conclude with the growth of data. The decision-making process with rapidly increasing data lacks quality. Moreover, the concerns are becoming bigger and bigger with the growth of some connected devices that continuously collect and generate big data.

Conclusion

IoT will undoubtedly transform the health industry and the way patients are treated. Not only will it benefit doctors and other specialists, but people who have no access to the basic health facilities. Addressing few problems such as data security will revolutionize the health industry without breaching the privacy. Let’s embrace technology as a blessing instead of a curse and see what happens in the coming years.

The post Internet of Things in Healthcare: What are the Possibilities and Challenges? appeared first on ReadWrite.

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US Supreme Court will revisit ruling on collecting internet sales tax

The United States Supreme Court has agreed to hear the state of South Dakota’s argument that a 26-year-old tax-related ruling be overturned, which could free state and local governments to collect billions in internet sales tax, according to a report today from Bloomberg. The 1992 ruling, from Quill v. North Dakota, centered on a mail-order business and inadvertently set a far-reaching precedent for e-commerce companies by only allowing states to collect sales tax from businesses with a “physical presence” in a given state. Critics of the ruling have long decried the clause by saying it makes no sense in the age of Amazon and internet e-commerce, and that it disadvantages brick-and-mortar retailers and state and local governments.

South…

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Samsung Internet Beta v6.4 offers enhanced download management [APK Download]

OEM apps are pretty hit and miss – with emphasis on the miss – and web browsers often seem like a wasted effort given the competition out there, not least from Google’s own Chrome browser. Samsung Internet succeeds where many others fail, however, and offers a compelling experience whether you own a Samsung device or not. It’s fast and stable, and the devs have been on a roll adding useful new features since it was launched.

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Samsung Internet Beta v6.4 offers enhanced download management [APK Download] was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Internet of Things News of the Week, January 8 2017

Mapping the floor, and your WiFi

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What exactly is going on with all of our chips? Security researchers have discovered that a flaw in Intel and some ARM processors can leak protected data if exploited. There are two exploits, Spectre and Meltdown. What’s worse is that the solution to Spectre isn’t readily available. OS vendors have tweaked their operating systems to mitigate the risks associated with Meltdown. As far as security news, this one is huge and people are trying desperately to figure out what is going on and how to fix it. For the more technically minded, the tweet stream is a good place to start. If you are less inclined to dig into how computers handle memory buffers then read Ars. (@gsuberlandArs Technica)

Layoffs at Eero: Mesh Wi-Fi startup Eero laid off about 30 people — or about 20% of its workforce — according to this article. Eero confirmed laying off 30 people, and said it was killing a speculative project so it could focus on its “core business.” My hunch is that Eero realized that times are getting tougher for once high-flying IoT startups and it should focus on getting revenue and building a business. Especially since its claim to fame (mesh Wi-Fi) has been copied by other companies. (TechCrunch)

Speaking of Wi-Fi: Roomba vacuum robots that have Wi-Fi chips will soon use their radios to create a map of Wi-Fi coverage in your home. This way you can avoid dust bunnies and dead spots. After Roomba’s CEO got in trouble a few months back for proposing that the company would map users’ homes, this features sounds more like an attempt to do something … anything … with some of the capabilities on the device that don’t involve selling user data. After the hubbub over mapping, the CEO promised never to do that. I’m curious who takes them up on this.  (TechCrunch)

Yes, even more Wi-Fi news: Cirrent, a startup I’ve been excited about for quite some time, has signed on several big name brands to use its automatic provisioning service. Electrolux, Cypress and Ayla Networks are now using Cirrent’s ZipKey service to get devices on the network faster. Electrolux will use Cirrent for its appliances, Cypress will make the feature available on its silicon and Ayla will let any company using its cloud offer the functionality. ZipKey works by using an available and certified Wi-Fi network to make a connection with a product when it comes out of the box. Then a consumer can claim the product and move it over to their own Wi-Fi network. Rob Conant, CEO of Cirrent, says ZipKey now has Wi-Fi networks covering more than 120 million homes in the U.S. and Europe — or 40% of them. Comcast is one of the companies providing hotspot access for ZipKey.

10 IoT companies to watch: The close of the year is a perfect time for lists and predictions, and most are pretty redundant. However, I liked this one from EE Times that starts off with nothing great, but then redeems itself by digging into the idea that many middlemen in the IT ecosystem are trying to absorb more roles in the industrial IoT. As an example, Arrow (a distributor and owner of EE Times) buying a company this week that lets it take on systems integration. The startups are pretty good too. (EE Times)

Smart baking startup gets more dough: Sorry, I couldn’t resist. Drop, the maker of a connected scale, raised more than $ 7 million in VC funding from firms like Alsop Louie Partners, according to an SEC filing. Drop has parlayed expertise from building its connected scale into creating recipes designed for humans and machines to make things together. That sounds fancier than it is today, but through a partnership with GE, you can use a Drop recipe to preheat your oven at the right point in a recipe automatically. Other automations could follow as cooktops get smarter.  (Axios)

Ads on Alexa? Eek! This week CNBC reported that Amazon was discussing marketing opportunities with large consumer product companies. My colleague Kevin wasn’t thrilled and started wondering what would make a good voice ad on a smart speaker that could be used by multiple people. Hint: Not much. (StaceyonIoT)

New York may be the first to try to hold algorithms accountable: I starting thinking about algorithmic bias in 2015 after I left Gigaom. I toyed with the idea of doing a fellowship or writing a book about how programmers were building a world that was data-driven and seemingly rational, but was fueled by all kinds of assumptions in the code. That world is rapidly coming to pass, and even without a book, people are wising up to this. As more sensors track more things, we’re going to get a lot of junk algorithms trying to nudge people in particular directions. I loved this story of a New York City Council member trying to ensure those algorithms are transparent to citizens. (The New Yorker)

A second neural network on a stick: Last year I got excited about Intel putting silicon from Movidius on a USB stick. The idea was to offer a powerful computer vision processor in a mobile format to see what people would do with it. To me it represented the beginning of being able to train neural networks at the edge. Now, there’s a second neural network on a stick from a startup called Gyrfalcon Technology that claims to be much more powerful and use less energy. The future is coming faster than I thought. (Alisdair Allan)

Stacey on IoT | Internet of Things news and analysis