Intel’s 8th-Gen Xeon and Core Processors Feature Redesigned Hardware to Address Spectre and Meltdown Vulnerabilities

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Intel CEO Brian Krzanich today announced that its next-generation Xeon Scalable (Cascade Lake) processors and its 8th-generation Intel Core processors will feature redesigned components to protect against the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities that affect all modern processors.

Spectre variant 1 of the vulnerabilities will continue to be addressed in software, while Intel is implementing hardware-based design changes to offer future protection against Spectre variant 2 and Meltdown variant 3.

We have redesigned parts of the processor to introduce new levels of protection through partitioning that will protect against both Variants 2 and 3. Think of this partitioning as additional “protective walls” between applications and user privilege levels to create an obstacle for bad actors.

Intel’s new Xeon Scalable processors and its 8th-generation Intel Core processors are expected to start shipping out to manufacturers in the second half of 2018.

Ahead of the hardware changes, Intel says that software-based microcode updates have now been issued for 100 percent of Intel products launched in the past five years, and all customers should make sure to continue to keep their systems up-to-date with software updates.

Krzanich also reaffirmed Intel’s commitment to customer-first urgency, transparent and timely communications, and ongoing security reassurance.

Apple began addressing the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities back in early January with the release of iOS 11.2, macOS 10.13.2, and tvOS 11.2, which introduced mitigations for Meltdown. Subsequent iOS 11.2.2 and macOS High Sierra 10.13.2 Supplemental updates introduced mitigations for Spectre, as did patches for both macOS Sierra and OS X El Capitan in older machines.

Apple’s software mitigations for the vulnerabilities have not resulted in any significant measurable decline in performance.

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13 years after Intel’s iPhone mistake, it might take the biggest ever tech deal to resolve it

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Some 13 years after Intel turned down the opportunity to make the CPU for the upcoming iPhone, is it now considering the world’s biggest ever tech acquisition to deal with the threat that decision continues to pose today.

In 2005, when Apple was working on the first-generation iPhone to be launched in 2007, Steve Jobs invited Intel to pitch for the CPU business for the planned smartphone. Not believing Apple’s sales projections, and not seeing any way to make money from it, Intel turned him down …



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Intel’s VPU could save gamers from losing GPU power to AI in the next Windows update

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Microsoft today announced it will bring baked-in AI to its operating systems in the next Windows update. Soon, PCs will operate complex machine learning applications locally that normally run in the cloud. Unfortunately for gamers this will be accomplished by tapping the power of graphics processing units (GPUs). Thankfully, however, Intel has an alternative. When the slew of new machine-learning based apps, programs, and core processes begin to infiltrate the new Windows AI platform – and you can bet it’ll be sooner rather than later – the best way to power them will be harnessing as much GPU power as…

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Intel’s new graphics drivers automatically optimize game settings

Intel is introducing a new feature for its processors with integrated graphics, allowing games to be automatically optimized on systems. The feature is similar to Nvidia’s GeForce Experience, an application that’s designed to tweak game settings so they work best on a laptop or PC. Intel’s new graphics control software is particularly useful on laptops that aren’t really designed to run games, and it works on all Skylake or newer processors.

PC World reports that this new driver update includes support for Intel’s new Kaby Lake G chips that have AMD’s Radeon Vega graphics built in. Dell and HP are both launching laptops with these new processors, and they should be a lot better for gaming. Battlefield 1, Battlefield 4, American Truck…

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The Corsair One gaming PC gets updated with Intel’s latest eighth-gen processors

The Corsair One gaming PC came out last year offering an interesting idea: a gaming PC in the same vein as traditional consoles, meaning it was a preconfigured, prebuilt box that users could expect just to work without any tinkering around with internal parts or power supplies.

And now, Corsair is releasing a pair of updated versions of the original Corsair One, boosting the processor to Intel’s latest eighth-generation, six-core Core i7-8700K and bumping up the graphics card from the Nvidia GTX 1080 to the upgraded Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti.

Photo: Corsair

There are two versions of the updated Corsair One — the Corsair One Pro Plus, which has 16GB of RAM, and the Corsair One Elite, which has 32GB. Like the original…

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Intel’s Drone-Powered Opening Ceremony Show Broke A World Record

Intel put on a stunning aerial display at the 2018 Winter Olympics opening ceremony. The show didn’t win Intel any medals, but it did break a world record.

The post Intel’s Drone-Powered Opening Ceremony Show Broke A World Record appeared first on Futurism.


Intel’s Fake 5G Olympic Hail Mary

If there ever were a time when perception Trumped reality, this would be it. So much of what we see these days that looks real just isn’t. I can connect a lot of this back to Steve Jobs, who was the master at this in the tech world. However, I’m worried that too many people don’t realize that there were several times Steve missed jail by the skin of his teeth, largely because he did amazing work under pressure. There isn’t anyone at his level at the moment, suggesting that much of the activity I’m seeing will end badly.

Intel’s drone light show never got off the ground for the 2018 Winter Olympics opening ceremony

They aired pre-recorded footage anyway.

Last-minute “impromptu logistical changes” kept Intel from performing its drone light show live during the opening ceremonies for the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea. But that didn’t stop NBC from airing footage of it for those watching the taped delayed version nor did it stop Intel from celebrating the feat on Twitter.

U.S. viewers tuned in to a tape-delayed broadcast on Friday night that showed pre-recorded footage from December, when Intel’s light show broke the Guinness World Record for flying the most drones, 1,218, simultaneously.

The live show was intended to be a pared down version of the feat, with 300 drones flying at the end of the opening ceremony, but that too was scrapped.

“During the Ceremony, POCOG made the decision to not go ahead with the show because there were too many spectators standing in the area where the live drone show was supposed to take place,” according to a statement from the Olympic organizing committee.

Here’s what the opening ceremonies were supposed to look like live. Images of the December rehearsal show the “Shooting Star” drones lighting up the sky with Olympic rings, a snowboarder and a dove.


And this is what an individual light drone looks like:

The Winter Olympics rehearsal surpassed Intel’s 2016 Guinness World Record of 500 drones flown simultaneously in Germany.

Here’s Intel’s behind-the-scenes video of the rehearsal:

Update: This post has been updated with a quote from the Olympic organizing committee and to correct the number of drones to 1,218 from 1,280.

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With a single focus, Intel’s Vaunt has more potential than Google Glass

Back in October of 2013, I got my own pair of Google Glass in order to cover the technology. The site where I worked at the time paid the $ 1,500 cost, and I later spent my own $ 225 to add custom frames that could handle my eyeglass prescription. Given the fate of Glass, we clearly didn’t get a good return on those investments.

Still, there were some things to like about the experience. Glass brought contextual information “closer” to me a relatively non-intrusive way. And that’s exactly what Intel’s smart glasses prototype, known as Vaunt, can do.

When I first read about Vaunt over at The Verge earlier this week, I thought less about the hardware and more about that vision of context and personally important data. That’s because all of our technological advances in mobile computing have impacted this theme.

I look at it this way:

  • In the desktop age, the web brought us closer to data on other computers.
  • Connected laptops brought us closer to data when away from the desktop.
  • Phones put that data in our hand and pocket almost wherever we were.
  • Smartwatches let us wear that data, bringing it even closer
  • Smart glasses can beam that data — at least in the case of Vaunt — directly on our retinas.

Every step of that progression gets us physically closer to contextual information. I suppose the next, or maybe final, step is a Matrix-like jack that simply ports that data directly into our brains, but who knows? Regardless, this is an important theme as more devices around us create gobs of data. The fewer barriers there are between us and the information we want, the faster we can use or act upon it.

And that’s why I’m excited about Vaunt’s potential, perhaps more so than I was about that of Google Glass.

To contrast the two at a high level, Vaunt isn’t trying to take smartphone functions — such as taking photos and videos, a key reason Glass never had a chance of mainstream success — and move them to your eyes. Instead, the product is singularly focused on very specific information that you will want at a specific time and/or place.

That approach has benefits from a hardware perspective too. t’s why you essentially can’t tell the difference between Vaunt and a traditional pair of glasses. They appear to be standard eyeglass frames to both you and the people around you.

Without the need to include a camera sensor, microphone or speaker, the small chips and display components fit inside the frames. Eliminating the camera also allows for a smaller battery since powering an image sensor typically uses a lot of energy. Using a low-powered, single color laser for the retina projection helps with battery life too when compared to the color display used in Google Glass.

By distilling potential product features into essentially one — simple but very useful information — Vaunt actually solves a problem; something Glass sort of did but other extra features came along for the distracting ride. In fact, I don’t see much of a distraction factor with Vaunt because they don’t look like some technological device nor will people even realize that your retina is receiving information.

Clearly, this doesn’t mean Vaunt will be successful. In fact, Intel isn’t even sure of how Vaunt will be used. That’s why the company will be launching an early access program for developers at some point this year. Intel is just providing the technology while developers will provide the functions that they think people will want.

Think of Vaunt then as a new hardware platform with a very limited feature set. That feature is very powerful though: It takes us one step even closer to the information that personally matters most to us..

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The HomePod, Intel’s Vaunt smart glasses, and the Falcon Heavy launch

A lot of things happened this week in the world of The Verge, and we have some first-hand experience to share.

This week on The Vergecast, Nilay, Dieter, and Paul, welcome science reporter Loren Grush back to the show to tell us what it was like to watch SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket launch in person, as well as meeting SpaceX CEO Elon Musk.

Also, Dieter got an exclusive look at Intel’s new smart glasses, and Nilay reviewed Apple’s HomePod, so they share their experiences with the technology and discuss what it means for the rest of the market.

There’s a lot more in between that — like Paul’s weekly segment “USB-C-crets” (I think that’s how you spell it) — so listen to it all, and you’ll get it all.

02:17 – Intel made smart glasses…

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