Android malware found inside seemingly innocent QR code apps

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Google is getting better at keeping Android malware out of the Play Store, and that's leading attackers to use more sophisticated disguises for their rogue apps. SophosLabs has proof: it just detailed a recent ad-spawning malware strain, Andr/HiddnAd…
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Police have released the first video from inside the Uber self-driving car that killed a pedestrian

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Screengrab from video taken inside Uber’s self-driving car

Here’s what the car — and its operator — saw.

Three days after an Uber self-driving vehicle fatally crashed into a pedestrian in Tempe, Ariz., police have released video footage of what the vehicle saw with its cameras moments before running the woman over, and what happened inside the vehicle, where an operator was at the wheel.

The Uber vehicle was operating in autonomous mode when it crashed into 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg on Sunday evening. Herzberg was transported to a hospital, where she later died from her injuries, in what may be the first known pedestrian fatality in a self-driving crash.

The video footage does not conclusively show who is at fault. Tempe police initially reported that Herzberg appeared suddenly; however, the video footage seems to show her coming into view a number of seconds before the crash. It also showed the vehicle operator behind the wheel intermittently looking down while the car was driving itself.

Warning: This video shows a woman about to be hit by a car — and a driver about to hit someone on the road. Viewer discretion is advised.

Tempe police were joined by the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in investigating the incident on Monday. The federal and local agencies are examining the video, as well as the vehicle, the accident site and any data the vehicle logged as part of the investigation.

Uber is cooperating with the investigation.

“The video is disturbing and heartbreaking to watch, and our thoughts continue to be with Elaine’s loved ones,” an Uber spokesperson said in a statement. “Our cars remain grounded, and we’re assisting local, state and federal authorities in any way we can.”

Tempe police said on Tuesday that the department has yet to determine blame. However, Chief of Police Sylvia Moir previously told the San Francisco Chronicle that preliminarily “it appears that the Uber would likely not be at fault,” largely because Herzberg was not crossing the street at the crosswalk.

“It’s very clear it would have been difficult to avoid this collision in any kind of mode” — self-driving or human-driven — “based on how she came from the shadows right into the roadway,” Moir told the Chronicle.

Based on the results of the investigation, Uber could face criminal charges. The Tempe Police will submit their findings to The Maricopa County Attorney’s Office to determine if criminal charges are warranted.

Uber has grounded its fleet of self-driving cars in the four cities they are currently being tested in, as have a few other players like Toyota and Boston-based self-driving startup, nuTonomy.

The public reaction to the incident could delay autonomous development as a whole, or at least could affect Uber’s self-driving efforts.

If Uber’s technology is found to be at fault in this accident, the company may face some fresh resistance from new or existing partnering automakers. That may still be the case even if there wasn’t a failure of the technology. The public perception and reaction alone could be enough for automakers to be wary of working with Uber publicly. Striking these relationships and maintaining its public image ahead of a planned 2019 IPO are pertinent for the company.

Recode – All

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Inside Google’s plan to build a smart neighborhood in Toronto

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

On the Sidewalk Labs website is a 200-page document explaining its vision for a smart neighborhood in Toronto. It's packed with illustrations that show a warm, idyllic community full of grassy parks, modular buildings and underground tunnels with del…
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Teardown shows the crazy engineering inside the Galaxy S9’s camera

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Galaxy S9 camera vs iPhone teardown, aperture

In terms of design, Samsung definitely played it safe with the Galaxy S9. There’s no iPhone-esque notch, no zany new materials — there’s even a headphone jack, that’s how straight-laced Samsung went. But the Galaxy S9 is far from boring, and that’s mostly thanks to the camera.

The primary camera (there’s a secondary telephone lens as well) on the back of the Galaxy S9 has a physical dual aperture, a feature that we haven’t seen on a smartphone camera for over a decade. It adjusts from f/2.4 to f/1.5 depending on the lighting, something that lets the camera vary exposure of an image without messing with the shutter speed or ISO. Installing a variable aperture helps capture sharp images in daylight while also having industry-leading low-light performance, something that shone through in our review.

Of course, variable apertures are nothing new to the photography industry. The impressive thing is how Samsung managed to miniaturize the physical mechanism necessary for a variable aperture and put it in something the size of a fingernail. JerryRigEverything tore down the camera (and the entire phone) on YouTube, and I highly recommend watching the video to fully understand how the aperture works.

Surrounding the camera sensor is a mechanical aperture unlike anything I’ve ever seen. Unlike the iris-style aperture that DSLR or mirrorless camera owners are used to, the Galaxy S9’s camera has two plates, actuated by a lever, which slide across the camera to limit the available light. There’s no in-between setting: you get your pick of f/1.5 and f/2.4, but that’s it. You might expect some kind of clever electronic system in a smartphone, but it seems that Samsung simply installed a mechanical system with a lever, actuated by a servo, which presumably turns a shaft and pushes the plate. At the scale we’re talking about, that kind of engineering is simply incredible.

 

Apple – BGR

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Inside the AMNH’s new ocean exhibit, with 30 very excited fourth graders

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

<em>A partial replica of a Triton submersible in the new exhibit Unseen Oceans at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.</em>

I had hoped that getting a media preview of a new museum exhibition meant having the luxury of strolling around undisturbed, without the crowds that turn any museum visit in New York into Macy’s on Black Friday. Instead, there are dozens of other journalists with cameras on tripods — and about 30 very excited fourth graders.

It’s Tuesday morning, and I’m at the American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan to take a look at a new exhibition called Unseen Oceans. The museum has arranged for the fourth graders to be here so that the media can take nice pictures of children learning cool stuff. Like many things that are great for the cameras, it’s distressing as an experience.

Photo: AMNH / R. Mickens
An array of…

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Sitting inside Bugatti’s $3M Chiron Sport didn’t make me a better person

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

The only way you can be more extravagant in your attention seeking would be to run for president

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Instagram has an unlaunched ‘Portrait’ feature hidden inside

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

 Eager to one-up Snapchat, Instagram appears to be preparing to expand its collection of shutter modes beyond options like Boomerang and Superzoom. Buried within Instagram’s Android Application Package (APK) is an icon for a Portrait shutter for the Stories camera. This could potentially let people shoot stylized portraits with bokeh effect-blurred backgrounds or other lighting effects. Read More
Mobile – TechCrunch
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