How to Change Audio Import Settings in iTunes on Mac and Windows PC

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How to Change Audio Import Settings in iTunes on Mac and Windows PC

The other day I wished to turn back the clock and bring all the retro songs, which I had accumulated in CDs, into life by ripping them all. While I was going through the task, I found iTunes importing and ripping the CDs with MP3 Encoder at 160kbps by default. But I discovered multiple options including AAC, AIFF, Apple Lossless (m4a), MP3, and WAV to import and encode music. I used Apple Lossless (m4a) and found it right on the money. Changing audio import settings in iTunes on Mac and Windows PC is hassle-free, and you should know this hack if you also often rip CDs using iTunes.

You can quickly access iTunes encoder settings either from the import screen or iTunes Preferences. Besides, the process is pretty same on both macOS and Windows. Enough gossip. Let’s get started!

How to Change Audio Import Settings in iTunes on Mac and Windows PC

How to Change Audio Import Settings in iTunes on Mac and Windows

Step #1. Launch iTunes and insert a CD to rip.

Step #2. On the Import screen, you need click on gear icon in the upper right corner.

Step #3. Now, you can adjust the audio import encoding settings as per your need.

Choose any of the following options:

  • AAC Encoder
  • AIFF Encoder
  • Apple Lossless Encoder
  • MP3 Encoder
  • WAV Encoder

You have the option to adjust quality settings for imported music in the “Setting” section. Though higher quality and higher bitrate audio files sound a bit better, it consumes more disk space. So, keep it in mind before going for the higher quality and higher bitrate audio files.

How to Change iTunes CD Encoding via Preferences on Mac and Windows PC

Step #1. Launch iTunes on your computer and click on iTunes menu. Then, select “Preferences.”

Click on Preferences in iTunes on Mac

Step #2. Under “General” settings, you need to “Import Settings.”

Click on Import Settings in iTunes on Mac or Windows PC

Adjust the iTunes import settings depending on your need. Click on the arrow next to the (X) Encoder and select your preferred option:

  • AAC Encoder
  • AIFF Encoder
  • Apple Lossless Encoder
  • MP3 Encoder
  • WAV Encoder

Change iTunes CD Encoding via Preferences on Mac and Windows PCChange Audio Import Settings in iTunes on Mac and Windows PC

Once you have fine-tuned the encoding settings, quit iTunes Preferences and import music from audio CDs into iTunes.

Stay tuned for More!

From now onwards, use this hack to encode the imported music in your preferred extension. Have any feedback? Shoot it in the comments.

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How to remedy the very slow import of AVCHD media into Final Cut Pro 10.4

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Are you having an issue importing AVCHD video in Final Cut Pro X? Here’s something that can help!

I’ve been testing and prepping my camera gear to take on my Overlanding excursions this coming spring. In my testing I’ve encountered a very annoying and head scratching error that would cause any imports of AVCHD video files to hang at 0% while importing and then finally make Final Cut Pro X crash. Luckily I found the cause to my troubles and hopefully it will help you out as well.

Old Software Cruft

I’m not a big fan of starting from scratch when getting a new Mac system and as such I usually import all of my settings and applications from my previous system. This time, however, I was bitten by this practice. My issue was the presence of the open source software “Perian”.

Perian was a software bundle that allowed earlier versions of QuickTime on macOS to play video formats not directly supported by the OS. Perian has not been maintained since 2012, so as you can see, my applications can go way back.

Perian was competing with my Final Cut Pro X install (since QuickTime and FCP on macOS are very tightly integrated) while importing my AVCHD files. Prior to this I was using MP4 files and as such I never encounter the error.

Removing Perian

Luckily, even though Perian hooked deeply into macOS, removing it was very simple.

  1. Shut down Final Cut Pro.
  2. Open System Preferences.
  3. Click for Perian. (It looks like a Swiss army knife)
  4. Select the General tab.
  5. Under the Installation header, click Remove Perian.

  6. Click the < to go back to the main System Preferences panel.
  7. Option-click or two finger click the Perian icon.
  8. Select Remove “Perian” Preferences Pane.

  9. Done! Once completed, I started up Final Cut Pro X and tested an AVCHD import and it functioned quickly and without issue. Problem solved!

Comments

When I first encountered this issue I googled my usual tech haunts for a solution but I was met with a variety of suggestions from downgrading Final Cut Pro X to wiping my macOS completely! Thankfully, I didn’t have to go that route. Do you have a fix or a solution to a Mac related problem? let us know in the comments on how you solved it!

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US Quietly Allows Import of Some Elephant Trophies

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The Trump administration has decided to lift a ban on the import of African elephant trophies, allowing hunters to bring parts of the animals’ bodies back home.

The news was unexpected: The President himself, speaking with British broadcaster Piers Morgan, said that he “didn’t want elephants killed and stuffed and have the tusks brought back into this [country].”

So it’s no surprise that even when passed without fanfare, a lift on the ban on elephant trophy imports has caused quite a stir.

“The Trump administration is trying to keep these crucial trophy import decisions behind closed doors, and that’s totally unacceptable,” Tanya Sanerib, international legal director at the Center for Biological Diversity, told AP. “Elephants aren’t meant to be trophies, they’re meant to roam free.”

Through a memorandum on its website, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has announced the news, saying that the authorities will consider requests on a case by case basis with immediate effect. It will be legal to import trophies from Zimbabwe and Zambia among others.

The ban elephant trophies was put in place by the Obama administration in 2014. In December 2017, a lawsuit filed by the National Rifle Association and Safari Club International entered the courts. It found that proper procedures weren’t followed when the regulations were enacted, including the lack of an opportunity for the public to comment on the ban.

The FWS mentioned the lawsuit’s resolution in its announcement about the ban being lifted. It also confirmed that several other measures enshrined in the Endangered Species Act, focusing on elephants, lions and bontebok are being revoked.

The agency noted that the Endangered Species Act will inform its case-by-case decisions on whether to authorize trophy imports, however it hasn’t elaborated on the criteria that will be used to determine which imports will be allowed. “The confusion is not helpful,” said Jimmiel Mandima, a conservationist at the nonprofit African Wildlife Foundation, in an interview with NBC News.

Some argued that the decision to allow trophy imports might help animal populations, as fees paid by hunters to shoot selected animals can help fund wildlife conservation initiatives. However, the strategy may not be so effective should the money be siphoned away by corrupt authorities, as some fear.

The post US Quietly Allows Import of Some Elephant Trophies appeared first on Futurism.

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[Yes!] Chrome lets you export your saved logins as .csv to easily import into your favorite password manager

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Whether on desktop or mobile, Chrome always offers to save your logins and passwords so it can easily autofill your details the next time you need to log in. In a way, if you accept that pop-up, Chrome (and thus Google) become your password manager. However, what happens if you want to use another password manager app? Migration can be a bit tough and not-so-straightforward and that’s why Chrome is now offering an export function.

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[Yes!] Chrome lets you export your saved logins as .csv to easily import into your favorite password manager was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Unlikely scenario suggests aluminum import tariff could add (insignificantly) to Apple pricing

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No matter what makes the headlines, you can be sure that there’s someone, somewhere out there trying to figure out an Apple angle for it …

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How to import photos from your digital camera to a specific folder on Mac

In High Sierra, you can select which folder you dump your digital camera content to, including a specific folder you’ve just created.

When you connect your digital camera to your Mac, you can import the content of said camera into the Photos app. You can even set up the Photos app on Mac to import photos automatically from that specific device. In High Sierra, you can also select which album you want those photos to go to. If you’re trying to import a bunch of pictures from a specific event, you can also create a brand new folder and move them directly to it for better organization. Here’s how.

How to select a folder to add new photos from your digital camera in the Photos app on Mac

After you prepare your digital camera to import to the Photos app, here’s how to select a specific folder to relocate to.

  1. Launch the Photos app on your Mac if it doesn’t open automatically.
  2. Click on your digital camera from the sidebar if it isn’t already selected.

  3. Select the photos you want to import to a specific folder.
  4. Click on Library at the top of the Photos app window.
  5. Select the folder You want to import the selected pictures directly to.

The pictures will be imported directly to the folder you selected. If you want to import multiple photos to different folders, follow the steps above and select which photos you want to import to each folder until you’ve imported them all.

How to create a new folder to add photos from your digital camera in the Photos app on Mac

If you’re just about to dump all of your vacation photos into the Photos app on your Mac, but haven’t created a dedicated folder for it yet, no problem, you can do so right before importing.

  1. Launch the Photos app on your Mac if it doesn’t open automatically.
  2. Click on your digital camera from the sidebar if it isn’t already selected.

  3. Select the photos you want to import to the newly created folder.
  4. Click on Library at the top of the Photos app window.
  5. Click on New Album.

  6. Enter an album name.
  7. Click on OK.

The pictures will be imported directly to the folder you created. If you want to import multiple photos to different folders, follow the steps above and create new folders for each until you’ve imported them all.

How to find the photos you’ve just added to a folder in the Photos app on Mac

After you’ve created or selected a specific folder to import your photos to, you can find them under My Albums.

  1. Launch the Photos app on your Mac.
  2. Click on My Albums in the sidebar.
  3. Double-click on the Album.

There they are!

Where your photos go if you don’t select a specific folder to import them from your digital camera in the Photos app on Mac

If you don’t select a folder to import your photos to, you can still find them easily. They will always be delivered to your Photos library (it’s the one right at the top of the sidebar) whether you send them to a specific folder or not. You can also find them in your Imports section, where you will find all of the photos you’ve ever imported to the Photos app on your Mac (unless you’ve deleted them).

  1. Launch the Photos app on your Mac.
  2. Click on Imports.

You can filter your imported content by favorited, edited, only photos, only videos, or keyword (if you’ve tagged your photos).

Click on Showing in the upper left and select a filter.

Any questions?

Do you have any questions about importing photos from your digital camera to a specific folder in Photos on Mac? Put them in the comments and we’ll help you out.

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Apple’s challenge in India made tougher by second import tax hike in two months

In a move which hit Apple harder than other smartphone brands, India increased the import tax on smartphones from 10% to 15% in December. Less than two months later, it has just decided to increase the rate again, this time to 20% …

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Nokia 7 hits Europe through unofficial import

The Nokia 7 is currently exclusive to China, with fans in Europe and other regions still waiting. Tired of the whole thing, a Romanian retailer Quickmobile decided to step in and offer the device unofficially for the equivalent of €324. The 4 GB version will be available for dispatch on January 10, and it comes with free delivery and 24-month warranty for individual clients. The Nokia 7 was announced back in October with a Snapdragon 630 chipset that comes with a 2.2 GHz octa-core CPU. The internal storage is 64 GB, with a microSD slot for 256 GB more. The display of the phone…

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iPhone X Now Costs up to $1,647 in India After Import Tax Increase

Apple has hiked the prices on most of its iPhone models being sold in India after the government raised import taxes on foreign-made phones, according to a new report.

Prices for imported Apple devices have, on average, risen about 3.5 percent, Reuters reported. That means that a 256-gigabyte iPhone 8 is 79,420 rupees, about $ 1,237 in U.S. dollars. On the high end of the spectrum, a 256 GB iPhone X will now run Indian consumers 105,720 rupees, about $ 1,647.

For comparison’s sake, $ 1,650 would be roughly enough to buy both a 64GB iPhone 8 and a 64GB iPhone X in the U.S., before taxes.

The only exception among Apple’s lineup is the locally produced version of the iPhone SE. Earlier this year, Apple tapped its Taiwanese supply chain partner Wistron to assemble iPhone SE devices in Bengaluru, India. Currently, the iPhone SE sells for between 20,000 and 24,000 rupees on various online retail outlets — which roughly translates to about $ 310 to $ 380.

But even the locally produced iPhone SE is beyond the budgets of many Indian consumers. As Reuters points out, Apple is seen as an “aspirational brand” that’s beyond the reach of many. That becomes especially apparent when an iPhone X costs about 20 to 30 percent of an individual’s average annual income in the country, according to 2016 World Bank data.

Because of that, Apple holds just less than three percent of the smartphone market share in the country. In an effort to gain ground, it’s even kept older and outdated iPhone models for sale in India.

India is becoming increasingly important for device makers, as the country has recently surpassed the United States as the world’s second-largest smartphone market after China. While basic and feature-limited phones still make up a majority chunk of the 750 mobile devices in India, sales of smartphones are steadily growing faster, according to Reuters.

But last week, the Indian government raised import taxes on smartphones from 10 to 15 percent in hopes of spurring local manufacturing. For companies like Samsung, which already locally assembles most of the devices sold in the country, that doesn’t make much of a difference. But it has a bigger impact on Apple’s products since around 88 percent of iPhones are imported into the country.

Apple’s local manufacturing ambitions don’t just stop at the iPhone SE — Cupertino has long wanted to create a “manufacturing ecosystem” in the area. But it’s also sought a range of tax breaks and financial incentives to do so. Handouts that the Indian government has, thus far, seemed hesitant to agree to.

Of course, some analysts question whether the increase in import taxes will really have that profound of an effect on Apple’s market share in India. “Apple’s halo as a premium brand in India cannot be taken away by this meager price rise,” said Navkendar Singh of research firm IDC.

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