Google Home Max May Damage Your Furniture As Well Just Like HomePod And Sonos One

According to new tests, Google Home Max is prone to damaging your newly polished furniture just like HomePod and Sonos One. Here’s what you need to know.

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Redmond Pie

Apple HomePod may leave white rings on some wood furniture

Apple HomePod white rings wood furniture

The HomePod is now available to the public and blasting tunes in owners’ homes, but Apple’s device is doing more to peoples’ homes than just filling them with music.

Some Apple HomePod owners have found that the smart speaker can leave a white ring on wood furniture. The Wirecutter discovered in its HomePod review that the device left a white ring on both an oiled butcher block countertop as well as a wooden side table. Owners on Twitter have noticed the issue, too.

When asked about the white rings, Apple confirmed the problem and said that “the markets can improve over several days after the speaker is removed from the wood surface.” If the rings don’t go away on their own, Apple suggests that users “try cleaning the surface with the manufacturer’s suggested oiling method.”

This is a weird issue that could be serious if HomePod ends up damaging expensive wooden furniture. It’s kind of a weird problem for the HomePod to have since we haven’t heard any other smart speakers running into the same issue, and it’ll be interesting to see what exactly is causing these white rings to appear.

HomePod owners, have you noticed any white rings on your furniture?

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Has the HomePod left a ‘white ring’ on any of your furniture? [Poll]

HomePod is making its mark on early adopters. Earlier this week, it was discovered that Apple’s HomePod can leave a white ring on certain wood finished furniture. While it’s unclear how widespread the issue is, Apple did acknowledge it a support document, saying that it is not unusual for “vibration-dampening silicone” to leave marks.

We’re curious: Have you noticed the HomePod leaving white rings on your furniture?

more…

9to5Mac

Like HomePod, Sonos One Leaves White Rings on Some Furniture

The HomePod’s silicone base can leave white rings on some wood surfaces that have an oil or wax finish, a problem that Apple yesterday said was “not unusual.” As it turns out, Apple wasn’t incorrect — the Sonos One, a competing smart speaker, also leaves white rings on furniture.

Tom’s Guide reviewer Mike Prospero read about the HomePod causing rings on furniture yesterday and went to check his wood cabinet, where he did indeed discover a ring caused by the HomePod. But next to it, he found smaller square shaped marks, which had been caused by the Sonos One located near the HomePod.

Image via Tom’s Guide

When I got home, I saw a large white ring, a telltale indication that the HomePod’s silicone base had messed up the finish. But, as I was inspecting the damage, I noticed a series of smaller white marks near where the HomePod was sitting.

A closer inspection revealed that the Sonos One speaker, which also has small silicone feet, had made these marks on my cabinet. Looking around the top of the cabinet, I noticed a bunch of little white marks, all left from the Sonos Ones as I moved them around. So, they will damage your wood furniture, too. We’re awaiting comment from Sonos.

Like the HomePod, the Sonos One has a silicone base with four small feet. It doesn’t make a ring as prominent as the ring caused by the HomePod, but it does appear to cause the same marks.

White rings became a topic of discussion yesterday morning after independent reviews from Pocket-lint and Wirecutter pointed out the marks the HomePod left on oiled or waxed furniture. After the issue received significant media attention, Apple published a “Cleaning and taking care of HomePod” support document that warned about the potential for marks on some wooden surfaces.

Apple said it is not unusual silicone bases to leave mild marks, and that they should go away with time or with some light polishing. Tom’s Guide reviewer Mike Prospero says that the marks do indeed appear to fade with time. From Apple’s support document:

HomePod is designed for indoor use only. When using HomePod, make sure to place it on a solid surface. Place the power cord so that it won’t be walked on or pinched.

It is not unusual for any speaker with a vibration-dampening silicone base to leave mild marks when placed on some wooden surfaces. The marks can be caused by oils diffusing between the silicone base and the table surface, and will often go away after several days when the speaker is removed from the wooden surface. If not, wiping the surface gently with a soft damp or dry cloth may remove the marks. If marks persist, clean the surface with the furniture manufacturer’s recommended cleaning process. If you’re concerned about this, we recommend placing your HomePod on a different surface.

It is not clear why Apple did not inform customers about the possibility of white marks on wood, as this is presumably an issue the company had to know about following the HomePod’s extended beta test with Apple employees and the years of development that went into the product.

A simple HomePod care support document published ahead of the HomePod’s launch, rather than after customers were left to discover the issue on their own would have likely mitigated much of the negative press and frustration from customers.

For those who are concerned about the HomePod damaging their expensive wood furniture, Apple recommends putting the HomePod on a different surface to avoid problems all together.

Related Roundup: HomePod
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Apple HomePod Has Damaged Some Owners’ Wooden Furniture

When Apple announced its much anticipated smart speaker last year, consumers were left disappointed when the firm delayed its release date. The HomePod is finally on sale around the world, and although it’s gathered mostly positive reviews so far, owners are complaining about annoying new flaw.

After placing the smart speaker on wooden surfaces, some users have noticed that it leaves behind a strange white mark – even damaging expensive furniture.

People have taken to social media platforms such as Twitter to discuss the problem. One user called the situation “unfortunate”, suggesting that the firm should have noticed the fault in the design stage.

“After all a designer does, there are some unforeseen issues that always arise…. but this is something that could easily have been caught in the design process,” they wrote.

Apple has since confirmed that its new speaker may cause damage to wooden furniture and has created a dedicated help page to support customers who are experiencing this issue. 

On the page, the company claims that it is not “unusual for any speaker with a vibration-dampening silicone base to leave mild marks when placed on some wooden surfaces”.

It attributed the problem to “oils diffusing between the silicone base and the table surface. However, Apple has reassured customers that they “often go away after several days when the speaker is removed from the wooden surface”.

The company added: “If not, wiping the surface gently with a soft damp or dry cloth may remove the marks. If marks persist, clean the surface with the furniture manufacturer’s recommended cleaning process.”

Wirecutter and PocketLint are among the tech websites that have produced reviews of the speaker, but they too have noticed this flaw.

Stuart Miles, founder of PocketLint, told the BBC that he had to “sand the wood down and then re-oil it” in order to eradicate the damage.

He said: “It wasn’t the end of the world for us. But if you’ve bought an expensive Scandinavian sideboard or some beautiful piece of wooden furniture and then got a mark on it from the speaker, you can imagine the horror.”

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