Apple urges users to send money to friends with Apple Pay Cash, upgrade to iOS 11.2

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Apple on Thursday sent an email blast to iCloud users and customers on record advertising the ability to send money to friends using Apple Pay Cash, the company’s peer-to-peer money transfer service that was introduced in December.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

How to limit HomePod access so family and friends can’t send texts, create reminders, or hijack your music

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There are two different ways to lock your HomePod from outside access — restricting access to AirPlay only, disabling messages, reminders and notes. AppleInsider shows you how to access and control both of these.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

These termite-hunting ants lick the severed legs of their friends to treat them

Termite-hunting ants in sub-Saharan Africa treat each other’s wounds by licking them, according to new research. It might sound icky — but the treatment actually saves lives.

The ant, called Megaponera analis, specializes in raiding termite nests. These hunts, however, are dangerous: The ants can lose legs or antennas, and sometimes they die. A study last year showed that the ants rescue their injured friends in the battlefield, taking them back to the nest. Now, researchers have shown what exactly happens in the nest after those rescue operations. In hour-long sessions, healthy ants take turns licking the injured mate’s severed legs, treating the open wounds. And that reduces mortality by 70 percent, possibly by fighting off infections,…

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The Verge – All Posts

Secret iPhone code leaked by Apple employee to his friends for jailbreak purposes

iPhone iBoot Source Code

Apple had to publicly acknowledge last week that iBoot for iOS 9, the secure software that runs on iPhones and iPads before the operating system kicks off, had indeed been leaked. Apple said at the time that the security of its proprietary software isn’t key to iPhone secrecy, but the company still filed a copyright claim to remove the leaked iBoot source code from Github.

A security researcher dubbed the leak as the “biggest” in Apple’s history, suggesting that access to iBoot may have huge security implications, even if the source code is two years old. If discovered, new iBoot vulnerabilities may be used by the jailbreak community to create new ways of hacking iOS devices.

It turns out that people active in the jailbreak community encouraged a low-level Apple employee to leak the source code in the first place.

According to Motherboard’s findings, the Apple employee leaked the code in 2016 to five people, according to two people who first received the code. The person wasn’t a disgruntled employee, people say. Instead, he leaked the files to his jailbreak friends who were interested in iOS security. Apparently, the person took plenty of additional code that wasn’t yet leaked, aside from iCode.

“He pulled everything, all sorts of Apple internal tools and whatnot,” a friend said.

The original group hadn’t planned for the code to leave that circle of friends, but, eventually, one of them shared it with someone else.

“I was really paranoid about it getting leaked immediately by one of us,” one of the friends said. “Having the iBoot source code and not being inside Apple…that’s unheard of.”

“I personally never wanted that code to see the light of day. Not out of greed but because of fear of the legal firestorm that would ensue,” a person said. “The Apple internal community is really full of curious kids and teens. I knew one day that if those kids got it, they’d be dumb enough to push it to GitHub.”

They worried that other people would use iBoot vulnerabilities for malicious purposes.

“It can be weaponized,” the people said. “There’s something to be said for the freedom of information, many view this leak to be good. [But] information isn’t free when it inherently violates personal security.”

“We did our damnedest best to try to make sure that it got leaked [only after the code] got old,” they added.

It all happened a year after their friends gave them the Apple files. One member of the group shared it with a person who shouldn’t have had it.

Ultimately, the original group had lost control of the leak, and it spread to more people, and it even hit Reddit in 2017, although it went largely unnoticed at the time.

The leak resurfaced on Github last week, going viral online — it appears to be a copy of the original leak.

Apple, apparently, was aware of the leak long before it was pushed to Github. The Apple employee who leaked it signed a non-disclosure agreement with Apple and refused to talk about the matter.

Apple – BGR

Sonos Makes a Spotify Playlist for Apple’s HomePod With Hidden ‘We’re Going to Be Friends’ Message

To celebrate the official launch of the HomePod, Sonos, one of Apple’s major competitors in the speaker market, made a “Welcome to the Party” playlist for the new device with a hidden message.


Shared on Twitter, the playlist features 21 songs, with each song selected for its title to send a secret note to Apple. Here’s the song list:

Hello / Apple / Something About Us / Together / Feels Right / Even Though / You’re Crazy / For This / Home / POD / Remember / Two Is Better Than One / Just Playing / It’s a Party / Everybody’s Coming To My House / Even You / Come As You Are / Fruit Machine / No Matter What You’re Told / We’re Going To Be Friends / Over Everything

Sending messages through Spotify playlists is a phenomenon that was popular for a brief time right around April of 2017, due to the way Spotify playlists can be arranged and displayed linearly on both the web and within Spotify’s apps. The practice is less common now, and though Sonos is using it to send what appears to be a friendly message, it’s also a jab at Apple.


The Sonos Spotify playlist made for Apple can’t be played natively on an Apple HomePod because the HomePod is limited to content played from Apple Music or iTunes. It can, of course, be played using AirPlay from a connected Mac or iOS device, but that’s less convenient than the native playback available via Sonos speakers.


Sonos hasn’t had much competition in the high-end connected speaker market, and for years, it’s been the go-to brand for high-quality multi-room sound, so it’s not surprising that the company feels somewhat threatened by the HomePod.

The launch of devices like the Amazon Echo and the Google Home likely didn’t concern Sonos because of the lack of focus on audio quality, but many new HomePod owners have discovered that the HomePod sounds just as good or better than Sonos speakers.

Back in October, Sonos launched its Sonos One, a speaker that directly competes with the HomePod thanks to the combination of Sonos sound and Amazon Alexa smarts.

Sonos kept the price of the Sonos One low at $199, and when the HomePod went on sale, as an attempt to lure Apple customers, Sonos kicked off a deal offering two of its Sonos One speakers for $349, the same price as a single HomePod.


While Sonos and Apple are now direct competitors, the HomePod and the Sonos One can peacefully co-exist once Apple’s AirPlay 2 protocol officially launches. Sonos has promised to add AirPlay 2 support to the Sonos One, and with AirPlay 2, a person who owns both a Sonos One and a HomePod will be able to play music to both devices at the same time over-the-air.

Related Roundup: HomePod
Tags: Spotify, Sonos
Buyer’s Guide: HomePod (Buy Now)

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