New Appthority Report Finds Tens of Thousands of Ad-Supported Apps Are Collecting Excessive Data

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Media Release: Appthority, the global leader in enterprise mobile threat protection, today released a new report that analyzed iOS apps in corporate environments and found that more than 24,000 ad-supported apps are hiding their excessive data collection in plain sight, putting mobile users and enterprises at risk.

These apps, which openly acknowledge requesting various types of user data for advertising purposes, were found in more than 70% of enterprise environments. However, this is just the tip of the iceberg as there is a much larger number of apps lurking in the enterprise that collect user data such as calendar, Bluetooth and photos—and are not upfront about their intentions.

Of the more than 2 million iOS apps scanned by Appthority, the 24,000 flagged were just the ones that openly ask users for access permission to deeper device functionality for advertising purposes. In fact, over 98% of enterprises have apps in their environments that display ads. These results suggest that data leakage from ad-supported apps is a much bigger problem than most enterprises realize.

“As a pioneer in the mobile security space, Appthority has long known that advertising within apps like Facebook is common and comes with risks, such as the leaking of users’ Personally Identifiable Information (PII),” said Seth Hardy at Appthority. “However, the Cambridge Analytica exposure made us wonder how many of these apps are directly accessing and using personal information for advertising.”

The reality is that apps that access data for advertising pose additional risks to enterprises and users compared to apps that access data solely for in-app functions. For example, ad-supported apps typically include third-party advertising libraries, which are not managed by the original app that employees trust and install. Therefore, information accessed by these advertising providers is usually not monitored or regulated by the original apps, users or by enterprises.

What’s more, ad-supported apps often access data without any real functional justification. When accessing data, mobile apps have to state a reason for wanting the access. Accessing data for in-app functions is a justifiable reason, but the iOS apps found were accessing data specifically for advertising purposes. This practice poses an important question about data access in enterprise environments: does the benefit of using the app outweigh the cost of losing control of user or enterprise data?

Because the app economy is heavily supported by ads, eliminating all apps that collect and use data for advertising from a device or enterprise environment is often not possible. But, the report also provides recommendations to users and enterprises to safeguard their data including, among others, being selective about granting permission to access data and deploying a Mobile Threat Defense solution to ensure visibility into and remediation of ad-supported and other app risks.

Register to download the full report here.

The post New Appthority Report Finds Tens of Thousands of Ad-Supported Apps Are Collecting Excessive Data appeared first on Mobile Marketing Watch.


Mobile Marketing Watch

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

2018 iPad teardown finds few major changes beyond A10 Fusion processor, Apple Pencil support

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Article Image

The new, education-focused iPad device offers two major changes, as well as a few minor ones, according to iFixit’s iPad 6 teardown, released Tuesday
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Education iPad teardown finds repairability doesn’t pencil out

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

“School is a brutal place for electronics—they need to be long-lived and fixable on the cheap for most education budgets,” iFixit told me in an email Tuesday…. Read the rest of this post here


Education iPad teardown finds repairability doesn’t pencil out” is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
Make sure to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

iDownloadBlog.com

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Investigation finds FBI did not exhaust all options before taking Apple to trial in San Bernardino case

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Article Image

An investigation into the FBI’s aggressive attempt to force Apple to assist in the unlocking of an iPhone tied to 2016’s San Bernardino shooting suggests a lack of communication, red tape and perhaps political motives were at play in taking the case to court.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Inquiry finds FBI sued Apple to unlock phone without considering all options

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

The Office of the Inspector General has issued its report on the circumstances surrounding the FBI’s 2016 lawsuit attempting to force Apple to unlock an iPhone as part of a criminal investigation. While it stops short of saying the FBI was untruthful in its justification of going to court, the report is unsparing of the bureaucracy and clashing political motives that ultimately undermined that justification.

The official narrative, briefly summarized, is that the FBI wanted to get into a locked iPhone allegedly used in the San Bernardino attack in late 2015. Then-director Comey explained on February 9 that the Bureau did not have the capability to unlock the phone, and that as Apple was refusing to help voluntarily, a lawsuit would be filed compelling it to assist.

But then, a month later, a miracle occurred: a third-party had come forward with a working method to unlock the phone and the lawsuit would not be necessary after all.

Though this mooted the court proceedings, which were dropped, it only delayed the inevitable and escalating battle between tech and law enforcement — specifically the “going dark” problem of pervasive encryption. Privacy advocates saw the suit as a transparent (but abortive) attempt to set a precedent greatly expanding the extent to which tech companies would be required to help law enforcement. Apple of course fought tooth and nail.

In 2016 the OIG was contacted by Amy Hess, a former FBI Executive Assistant Director, who basically said that the process wasn’t nearly so clean as the Bureau made it out to be. In the course of its inquiries the Inspector General did find that to be the case, though although the FBI’s claims were not technically inaccurate or misleading, they also proved simply to be incorrect — and it is implied that they may have been allowed to be incorrect in order to further the “going dark” narrative.

The full report is quite readable (if you can mentally juggle the numerous acronyms), but the findings are essentially as follows.

Although Comey stated on February 9 that the FBI did not have the capability to unlock the phone and would seek legal remedy, the inquiry found that the Bureau had not exhausted all the avenues available to it, including some rather obvious ones.

Comey at a hearing in 2017

For instance, one senior engineer was tasked with asking trusted vendors if they had anything that could help — two days after Comey already said the FBI had no options left. Not only that, but there was official friction over whether classified tools generally reserved for national security purposes should be considered for this lesser, though obviously serious, criminal case.

In the first case, it turned out that yes, a vendor did have a solution “90 percent” done, and was happy to finish it up over the next month. How could the director have said that the FBI didn’t have the resources to do this, when it had not even asked its usual outside sources for help?

In the second, it’s still unclear whether there in fact exist classified tools that could have been brought to bear on the device in question. Testimony is conflicting on this point, with some officials saying that there was a “line in the sand” drawn between classified and unclassified tools, and another saying it was just a matter of preference. Regardless, those involved were less than forthcoming even within the Bureau, and even internal leadership was left wondering if there were solutions they hadn’t considered.

Hess, who brought the initial complaint to the OIG, was primarily concerned not that there was confusion in the ranks — it’s a huge organization and communication can be difficult — but that the search for a solution was deliberately allowed to fail in order that the case could act as a precedent advantageous to the FBI and other law enforcement agencies. Comey was known to be very concerned with the “going dark” issue and would likely have pursued such a case with vigor.

So the court case, Hess implied, was the real goal, and the meetings early in 2016 were formalities, nothing more than a paper trail to back up Comey’s statements. When a solution was actually found, because an engineer had taken initiative to ask around, officials hoping for a win in court were dismayed:

She became concerned that the CEAU Chief did not seem to want to find a technical solution, and that perhaps he knew of a solution but remained silent in order to pursue his own agenda of obtaining a favorable court ruling against Apple. According to EAD Hess, the problem with the Farook iPhone encryption was the “poster child” case for the Going Dark challenge.

The CEAU Chief told the OIG that, after the outside vendor came forward, he became frustrated that the case against Apple could no longer go forward, and he vented his frustration to the ROU Chief. He acknowledged that during this conversation between the two, he expressed disappointment that the ROU Chief had engaged an outside vendor to assist with the Farook iPhone, asking the ROU Chief, “Why did you do that for?”

While this doesn’t really imply a pattern of deception, it does suggest a willingness and ability on the part of FBI leadership to manipulate the situation to its advantage. A judge saying the likes of Apple must do everything possible to unlock an iPhone, and all forward ramifications of that, would be a tremendous coup for the Bureau and a major blow to user privacy.

The OIG ultimately recommends that the FBI “improve communication and coordination” so that this type of thing doesn’t happen (and it is reportedly doing so). Ironically, if the FBI had communicated to itself a bit better, the court case likely would have continued under pretenses that only its own leadership would know were false.

Mobile – TechCrunch

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Google Maps finds routes in 39 more languages

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Believe it or not, Google Maps has only supported a limited set of languages so far. A bit ironic for a service that helps you navigate the planet, don't you think? That might not be a problem for many people after today. Google has added support for…
Engadget RSS Feed
Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Apple Watch more effective at detecting heart condition than KardiaBand accessory, study finds

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Article Image

A continuing study into the medical potential of consumer wearables has confirmed devices like Apple Watch are sensitive enough to detect abnormal heart rhythms with a 97 percent accuracy, a performance that beats out add-on ECG accessory KardiaBand.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Study finds that people are more loyal to Android than iOS

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

A new study done by Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP) says that Android users have higher brand loyalty than iOS users, as reported by TechCrunch. The report says that not only has Android loyalty been rising since early 2016, but it’s currently the highest it’s ever been.

To measure current loyalty to each platform, the study looked at the percentage of US customers who stayed with their operating system after upgrading their phones in 2017. Ninety-one percent stayed with Android, while 86 percent stayed with iOS. Mike Levin, partner and co-founder of CIRP, tells TechCrunch that “With only two mobile operating systems at this point, it appears users now pick one, learn it, invest in apps and storage, and stick with it.”

B…

Continue reading…

The Verge – All Posts

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Android beats iOS in smartphone loyalty, study finds

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

 Samsung’s new Galaxy S9 may not quite live up to the iPhone X when it comes to Samsung’s implementation of a Face ID-style system or its odd take on AR emoji. But that’s not going to matter much to Samsung device owners – not only because the S9 is a good smartphone overall, but because Android users just aren’t switching to iPhone anymore. In fact, Android users… Read More
Mobile – TechCrunch
Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Study finds fake news spreads faster and further on Twitter than truth

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

There's been a lot of discussion about fake news, how it spreads on social networks and how it impacts behaviors like political decisions. But there hasn't really been an in-depth look into how true and false information spreads on sites like Faceboo…
Engadget RSS Feed
Cash For Apps: Make money with android app