Micropodcasting? Facebook tries Voice Clip status updates

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

 More intimate than text but easier to record than video, Facebook hopes voice could get people sharing more on its aging social network. And internationally where users may have to deal with non-native language keyboards, voice lets them speak their mind without a typing barrier. Facebook is now testing Voice Clips as a status update option in India with a small percentage of users. First… Read More
Mobile – TechCrunch
Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Facebook found out no one wants a split News Feed

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Did you like the idea of Facebook splitting your News Feed into two? No? You're not the only one. Facebook has ended its Explore Feed test after user surveys indicated it wasn't popular. Explore was supposed to help you see more of your friends a…
Engadget RSS Feed
Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Facebook pumps the brakes on its secondary News Feed, ‘Explore’

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND


One of the largest changes to Facebook’s News Feed in recent years is finally getting the axe it deserves. Last October, The Guardian first reported that Facebook intended to split its algorithmic News Feed into two: one for non-promoted posts from Pages and publishers (called “Explore”), and one for your friends and family. In a blog post, Facebook’s head of News Feed, Adam Mosseri, said the experiment was motivated by “consistent feedback” that people wanted to see more from friends and family and less from media organizations and businesses. The change, predictably, didn’t go over so well in the six countries…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Facebook
The Next Web

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Facebook will stream The Oscars red carpet this weekend

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

The Academy Awards take place this Sunday and if you're an Oscar fan who can't get enough behind-the-scenes looks, Facebook has you covered. As Variety reports, Facebook will once again be the only social network to live-stream "The Oscars: All Acces…
Engadget RSS Feed
Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Facebook has decided that separating publishers into their own News Feed is a bad idea

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Facebook has ended a test that put publishers in one feed and friends in another.

Facebook has decided it’s a bad idea to separate brands’ and publishers’ posts from those that your friends and family share.

The social giant confirmed Thursday that it has ended a test of that concept it was running in six countries dating back to last fall.

The test removed content from publishers and businesses from the News Feed and put it inside a separate “Explore” feed, creating a digital divide between your friends and brands. Publishers in those countries that rely on Facebook for traffic freaked out when users no longer saw publisher posts interspersed with stuff from their friends.

“People don’t want two separate feeds,” wrote Adam Mosseri, the exec in charge of Facebook’s News Feed, in a blog post Thursday. “In surveys, people told us they were less satisfied with the posts they were seeing, and having two separate feeds didn’t actually help them connect more with friends and family.”

When Mosseri spoke at Recode’s Code Media conference in February, he said the test was “costly,” and that Facebook wanted to run it once before deciding “definitively once and for all” whether it worked or not.

It didn’t. So Facebook is ending the test. It is also shutting down its “Explore” tab, a section of the app where users could find public content from brands or publishers they didn’t follow.

The test wasn’t necessarily a waste — Facebook learned people don’t want two feeds! — but the company has also admitted that it wasn’t handled very well.

“We should have been more transparent and up front about [the test] ahead of it,” said Campbell Brown, Facebook’s head of news partnerships, onstage with Mosseri at Code Media. “[Publishers] totally freaked out, rightly so, because they didn’t understand what we were doing or trying to get at.”

The sentiment was echoed in Thursday’s blog post from Mosseri. “We also received feedback that we made it harder for people in the test countries to access important information, and that we didn’t communicate the test clearly,” he wrote. “We’re acting on this feedback by updating the way we evaluate where to test new products, and how we communicate about them.”

Facebook routinely makes changes to its News Feed to show users more (or less) of specific types of content, like live video. Its most recent News Feed update had a similar purpose to the now-defunct test: The change was made to show people more stuff from their friends and family, and less from brands and publishers.

That is still the priority, but separating the two groups completely isn’t the way to accomplish that.

Ironically, that total separation of friend stuff from publisher stuff is the premise of Snapchat’s redesign, the same redesign that people are freaking out about. Facebook found that strategy doesn’t work. It’ll be worth watching to see if Snapchat decides the same.


Recode – All

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Snapchat’s redesign puts publishers in one feed and friends in another. That’s exactly what Facebook says doesn’t work.

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Can Snapchat make two feeds work when Facebook couldn’t?

Facebook has decided that completely separating posts from your friends and family from posts shared by brands and publishers is a bad idea.

It says it discovered that to be the case when it tested the separation strategy by running two feeds for users in a handful of countries over the past four months.

“People don’t want two separate feeds,” wrote Facebook exec Adam Mosseri on Thursday. “In surveys, people told us they were less satisfied with the posts they were seeing, and having two separate feeds didn’t actually help them connect more with friends and family.”

Those findings aren’t just interesting for Facebook. That idea of separating friend stuff from publisher stuff? That was Snapchat’s entire argument for why it rolled out a massive redesign late last year. The new-look Snapchat keeps your friend content on one page and content from brands and celebrities on another.

So far, users haven’t liked the new Snapchat at all (though TechCrunch says downloads are actually up). CEO Evan Spiegel keeps preaching that it will just take time for people to realize the new feel is better.

But it’s interesting that Facebook has decided that this separation strategy doesn’t work. Snapchat will have to hope Facebook is wrong.


Recode – All

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Women in gaming have a powerful new ally: Facebook

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND


Facebook this week announced its new Women in Gaming Initiative, dedicated to encouraging more women to join the games industry. The social media company focuses on providing role models and success stories, and it’s actually a pleasant approach. Though gender and diversity in gaming is a sensitive topic at times, Facebook’s approach is relatively non-judgmental. The video intro with Sheryl Sandberg focuses on the number of women who game (46 percent in 13 countries, according to the reported data) and how it’s at odds with the number of people who make the games (23 percent). Sandberg goes on to say…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Facebook
The Next Web

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Facebook is not getting any bigger in the United States

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

It looks like Facebook’s U.S. user growth has officially peaked.

It’s starting to feel official: Facebook’s U.S. audience is as big as it’s going to get.

Facebook is massive in this country. More than two-thirds of Americans, specifically 68 percent, use the service, according to new research from Pew Research Center.

The troubling news: If you’re a Facebook investor, that number hasn’t increased over the past two years. Roughly 68 percent of U.S. adults used Facebook in 2016, too.

This shouldn’t come as a total shock. Facebook reported its first quarter-over-quarter decline in daily users in the U.S. and Canada at the end of 2017. And while the decline was small, just 700,000 users, it served as a red flag that the company may finally be tapped out in its most valuable market.

Facebook CFO Dave Wehner may disagree. Speaking at the Morgan Stanley Technology, Media and Telecom Conference on Wednesday he addressed the decline in North American users as, “a trend that we don’t see continuing on an ongoing basis.”

But the Pew data tells another story — that Facebook growth in the U.S. has officially stalled.

The good news for Facebook: Instagram is picking up some of the slack. Roughly 35 percent of U.S. adults now use Instagram, up from 28 percent in 2016.

Also from the report was confirmation (again) that Snapchat is still a major threat to Facebook’s dominance among young people. Facebook technically has a larger number of of 18- to 24-year-old users in the U.S. than Snapchat. But Facebook has 80 percent of that cohort using its service, and Snapchat has 78 percent. So it’s getting close.

YouTube, which isn’t always categorized as social media, was the biggest service on Pew’s list — 73 percent of all U.S. adults use YouTube, including 94 percent of all 18- to 24-year-olds.

The Pew report is based on telephone interviews conducted Jan. 3-10, 2018, among a national sample of 2,002 adults in the U.S.


Recode – All

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Facebook rolls out job posts to become the blue-collar LinkedIn

The Best Guide To Selling Your Old Phones With High Profit

 LinkedIn wasn’t built for low-skilled job seekers, so Facebook is barging in. Today Facebook is rolling out job posts to 40 more countries to make itself more meaningful to people’s lives while laying the foundation for a lucrative business. Businesses will be able to post job openings to a Jobs tab on their Page, Jobs dashboard, Facebook Marketplace, and the News Feed that they… Read More
Mobile – TechCrunch

When Facebook wants to clear things up, it turns to … Twitter

Brad Parscale, the Trump campaign’s digital director

This time, Facebook execs want to talk about the Trump campaign’s 2016 ad spend. Confused? We explain.

Facebook generated more than $ 40 billion in revenue last year. Twitter did $ 2.4 billion. Investors think Facebook is worth $ 527 billion. They value Twitter at $ 23 billion.

Facebook used to care about competing with Twitter. It stopped worrying about that a long time ago.

But Facebook can’t ignore what happens on Twitter.

Which is why there’s an email in my inbox from Facebook’s PR firm, telling me that a Facebook executive has sent out a series of tweets in response to a tweet from one of Donald Trump’s campaign officials, which had been retweeted by Hillary Clinton, and which was originally made in response to a tweet from a journalist.

Got it? Didn’t think so.

Here we go:

  • If you don’t follow digital advertising, that tweet may not seem like a big deal, but here’s why it was provocative: Parscale was suggesting that the Trump campaign was able to reach Facebook audiences at a much, much cheaper rate — expressed as a “CPM,” which means the cost to generate a thousand impressions — than the Clinton campaign did.
  • That tweet sat around until Sunday, when it was amplified by TechCrunch columnist Kim-Mai Cutler, who picked up Parscale’s comments and interpreted them to read that “Facebook may have systematically charged the Clinton campaign an order of magnitude or two more than it was charging Trump to reach American voters.”
  • Then Clinton herself retweeted Cutler last evening:
  • A few hours later, Facebook’s Andrew Bosworth, who used to be a VP in Facebook’s ads group and has become one of the company’s most outspoken executives on Twitter, responded with his own tweets, arguing that Facebook doesn’t set the prices for its ads — Facebook’s auction software sets the prices for its own ads:
  • Which brings us to the bulk email I got today from a Facebook rep telling me about another set of tweets from Bosworth. The crucial one is this chart, which shows that, throughout the campaign, the Trump and Clinton campaign paid roughly similar ad rates, and that the “Trump campaign paid slightly higher CPM prices on most days rather than lower as has been reported.”

Whew! We will leave it there, for now, although Facebook certainly isn’t done defending itself. And as weird as this may have seemed a few years ago, I doubt that it is done using Twitter to defend itself in debates that start on Twitter.


Recode – All