IDG Contributor Network: Who does JD Power say has best wireless purchase experience?

JD Power just released their 2018 wireless purchase experience study details, and there are two very interesting facts in these results that every buyer needs to know, yet no one is talking about. One is this. While there are winners, there are no losers this year. What I mean is, all the major carriers are now very good. In fact, they are so close it almost doesn’t matter which one you choose, based on this study.

However, there are differences you need to know. There are other factors you should be aware of to determine the best carrier for you. JD Power does a great job year after year of measuring different parts of the wireless experience in general. It keeps carriers on their toes. This is one of many factors to help users choose the best carriers for them.

To read this article in full, please click here

Computerworld Mobile

IDG Contributor Network: 2018 CCA Mobile Carriers Show helps smaller wireless carriers compete

How do smaller wireless carriers compete and win against the powerhouses of the industry like AT&T Mobility, Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile and Sprint. Smaller competitors like US Cellular, Xfinity Mobile, C Spire Wireless and many others face the same challenges, plus one more. Not only must they compete in a rapidly changing industry against the big four, but they are smaller and must also offer the user a compelling reason to choose them.

The CCA is the association that tries to help them do just that. At this year’s annual convention in Las Vegas at the end of March, the Mobile Carriers Show is getting ready to help the small and mid-size wireless marketplace. That means networks, carriers, MVNO, handset makers, apps and more. Many of the same players are at this smaller carrier show that are at the larger shows like CTIA and Mobile World Congress.

To read this article in full, please click here

Computerworld Mobile

IDG Contributor Network: The critical path to success for the Always Connected PC

I’m a believer in the concept of the Always Connected PC largely because it fits very well into the way I work. I prefer a desktop system when I’m at home and even build my own systems. But when I’m on the road, I mostly write, browse the web and consume content. The reduction in performance for this platform doesn’t bother me as a result because I need the thing to be light, have long battery life and be something I can be proud of.

This Always Connected PC is a huge joint initiative by both Qualcomm and Microsoft (disclosure, both are clients of the author), but often efforts like this are defined by what they don’t do well as opposed to what they do well. The real promise of the Always Connected PC is its ability to be a true 2-in-1 and not what we have had in this class up till now – good laptops that suck as a tablet. This is potentially the first product that could be a good laptop and a good tablet but, to get there, it needs a couple of things. 

To read this article in full, please click here

Computerworld Mobile

IDG Contributor Network: Windows on ARM and the future of PCs as a Service

This month, the initial battle will begin on what will be an historic war for the next generation of PCs.  Initially it will be fought on laptops but – much like smartphones drifted to tablets, and much of the initial wave of AI-driven, home-based digital assistants – this war may eventually encompass all PCs.

If this were just a war between processors, the X86 folks would likely win easily, both because Windows has decades of tuning on X86 and it is the entrenched part. But this isn’t about processors. This is about whether the computing will be done on the desktop or in the cloud.

In short this is a war between the modem and the processor…or yet another attempt to turn the PC into more of large smartphone.

To read this article in full, please click here

Computerworld Mobile

IDG Contributor Network: 5 ways you can unlock your enterprise mobility strategy

More and more industries are mobilizing their workforces. From nurses passing information to their colleagues via secure messaging as they change shifts, to police officers replacing paper notebooks with more efficient, secure digital counterparts, today’s mobile phones are portable enough and powerful enough to get the job done. 

Yet consumer versions of these phones, traditionally sold by carriers in the United States, are often unsuited for these very specific enterprise needs. Businesses may require custom software and configuration tools. They may need additional services that can continuously support and update to enterprise applications. And, if they have offices in multiple locations, they may need to implement a multi-carrier strategy.

To read this article in full, please click here

Computerworld Mobile