Comparing the sizes of flagship chipsets: Qualcomm, Samsung, Huawei adn Apple

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

There are four major manufacturers of flagship chipsets – Qualcomm (Snapdragon), Samsung (Exynos), Huawei (Kirin) and Apple (A-series). Three of those tend to be used in the respective companies’ own flagships. Apple certainly doesn’t want to share while Samsung and Huawei rarely find outside customers. We often talk about the power usage of a chipset – it’s important for the battery budget. Fabbing the chip at lower nanometers helps with that, but also balances the other important sheet. The price of a chip (patent costs aside) is proportional to its size. This makes it tricky to find…

GSMArena.com – Latest articles

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Samsung Galaxy S9 vs Galaxy S8: comparing the screen to body ratio

The front of the Galaxy S8 won over many fans while the back drew criticism. So, for the S9 generation Samsung seems to have focused on fixing the setup on the back of the phone. Where does that leave the front? We’ve seen CAD schematics, which show there’s barely any change so we wondered if the screen to body ratio (StB) will change at all. It’s perhaps not the most important metric, but it is a point of pride for many (makers and users alike). We decided to investigate based on leaked renders. So we put the latest leaked pictures of the S9 duo and put them side by side with their…

GSMArena.com – Latest articles

Roundup: Comparing the 18-core iMac Pro to the 10-core model

The iMac Pro is an interesting product. It’s not as modular as a Mac Pro could be, but is much more powerful than a standard 5K iMac. With that being said, the iMac Pro is getting outstanding reviews, and recently, Apple has begun shipping the 18-core iMac Pro, the most powerful Mac you can purchase today. And reception seems to be pretty good.

more…

9to5Mac

Audiophiles are comparing HomePod to $85,000 speakers—we’ll tell you why on The CultCast

The pre-sales have begun, but we’ll tell you why Apple’s new smart speaker may be a huge flop, this week on The CultCast. Plus: audiophiles are comparing HomePod’s tech to speakers that cost $85,000; Apple adds some long-awaited features to iOS 11; how to backup your iCloud photo library to your PC (and why you […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)

Cult of Mac

Google just made comparing phone specs ridiculously easy


Google just made it super easy to compare device specs. Now, typing something like ‘Google Pixel 2 XL vs iPhone X’ into search will bring up a table comparing specs and customer reviews for various devices. Android Police spotted the change over the weekend. Right now, the feature seems to work best with smartphones. While I get results for other smartphone comparisons like “OnePlus 5 vs Galaxy S8,” I don’t see anything if I type “Surface Pro vs MacBook Pro” and get a comparison, for instance. The comparison currently shows a few rows of basic specs, which you can expand…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Google
The Next Web

Comparing iPhone 8 charging speeds with fast charge, wireless and more

Article Image

With the launch of iPhone 8 and 8 Plus, Apple introduced its smartphone user base to fast charge technology capable of delivering an up to 50 percent charge in just 30 minutes. AppleInsider takes a closer look at the technology and how it compares to traditional — and wireless — charging methods in this video.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

History Is Rhyming: Fitness Functions & Comparing Blockchain Tokens To The Web

The Future of Cyrptocurrency

At the end of 2013, I wrote a blog titled: In The Future, Everyone Will Have Their Own Cryptocurrency. It was based on the premise that because we can easily create cryptocurrencies, we are going to see tokens minted for almost all networks of value, including every person. It started a multi-year rabbit hole towards designing the technical infrastructure for tokens (e.g. I worked on dogeparty, scrypt altcoins & I was a key contributor to the ERC20 standard) & the economic design of them.

The reality is:

Blockchain tokens have reduced the cost to tokenize coordination by orders of magnitude, and thus we are likely to see the effective tokenization (and by extension, the introduction of markets) into almost everything.

The reason why is quite simple: blockchain tokenization decreases the cost to coordinate by orders of magnitude. Coordination systems are utilized when the cost to run them are less than the benefits they provide. New coordination systems will come to exist because we’ve substantially lowered the costs to implement them:

Value of a coordination system > cost to coordinate.

We’ve seen this before: the web decreased cost to share information by orders of magnitude.

Value of information shared > cost to share that information.

Before the web, when you received a letter with some photos of loved ones far away, one might’ve wished to extend gratitude back immediately, but it wasn’t within our frame of reference that it would ever be possible to forward something as low bandwidth as a “like” back: which is now just a double-tap whilst you are lying in bed at night.

It was possible to do Twitter before the web, but good luck getting someone to use Twitter where we have to send it all through mail.

“Dear Donald Trump.

I hope this tweet finds you well. I think you are a terrible president. #carpediem

Yours in lulz,

Simon”

Blockchain Tokenization

Information systems today just didn’t fit into the context of the pipes that was available before the web. It was too costly, and unreasonable to do them. It’s why newspapers were bundled: they ALSO had a market (classifieds) in them, because this channel was already open. The hard work of distribution was done. But then… we began to program & automate information.

In the same vein, the modern limited liability, joint-stock corporation, (which everyone could create one), is about ~160 years old. Before then, you had to get a royal charter to allow access to tradable ownership and limited liability.

There are many coordination systems today that are being invented as we speak and that are going to be invented that just does not fit into the pipes of a corporation. A modern corporation succeeds because we have systems of law & systems of enforcement to enable them. In order to do so, we essentially rely on the massive cost of a nation state to enforce them. But now… we can now program & automate coordination.

I don’t think we can ultimately fathom how ground-breaking this is. Tokenized coordination systems that exist on scales we’ve never imagined. Like your great-grandmother not even pondering about the existence or need of something akin to sending a “like”, we haven’t even scratched the surface. We should absolutely be asking where this fits in, and where this could help. The result of which will create massive amounts of wealth.

The reason is that like information systems before the web, they under-fit the potential of information systems. We didn’t have Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Wikipedia, Medium, etc because they couldn’t fit into the channels that were available. We could build substantially more granular information systems, making them fit more for specific niches and needs. The modern corporation, as great as it was, only allowed us access to certain kinds of coordination systems.

Fitting information systems more appropriately led to more information sharing: as low bandwidth a ‘like’ is, it’s likely more ‘likes’ have been shared (in size), than all newspapers in history.

If we are going to fit tokenized, coordination systems more appropriately, the result is simply: more wealth creation… Perhaps greater than anything we’ve seen before. Perhaps greater than giving access to the joint-stock corporation to everyone in society.

Image Source: Scikit Learn

Do you think it would ever have made sense to en-masse create ownership in just a song? Tokenizing attention? Tokenizing a contract directly? Tokenizing memes? Tokenizing people? Tokenizing this blog post? Tokenizing public goods? We invented something as low bandwidth as a ‘like’. How granular does blockchain tokens go? What’s the lowest bandwidth coordination system blockchain tokens allow? 10 second organizations? Idea derivatives? Meme derivatives?

Much of these coordination systems might seem overkill, but you also have to remember that much of our information systems are just machines talking to each other. The liquidity of say tokenizing a contract and effectively trading it is costly for humans. It’s likely much of these coordination systems will be primarily exploited by machines to offset inefficiencies in the markets to our collective benefit.

Conclusion:

We’ve opened the Pandora’s box. We are on the multi-year path to tokenizing almost everything.

To combine the aphorisms:

Past performance doesn’t predict future results, but it sure rhymes.

PS: I’ve been busy writing a substantially longer blog post that puts it much broader context, including the history & theory of the firm, corporate legal innovations over time, systems and complexity theory, meme & curation markets, prediction markets, graph markets, history of collectibles & multi-disciplinary research from other fields that explains it all. Coming soon.

Disclaimer: I’ve drunk the Kool-Aid. I’ve held cryptocurrencies since 2011.

Disclosure: Several members of the Futurism team, including the editors of this piece, are personal investors in a number of cryptocurrency markets. Their personal investment perspectives have no impact on editorial content.

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed are solely those of the author. They do not necessarily represent the views of Futurism or its affiliates.

The post History Is Rhyming: Fitness Functions & Comparing Blockchain Tokens To The Web appeared first on Futurism.

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Comparing the best Twitter clients for Android (2017 edition)

For the longest time, the Twitter Android app just wasn’t very good. Sure it was functional, but it was clear that Twitter was focusing more on its iOS client. Third-party clients were, for that time period, the absolute best way to use Twitter on Android devices. Even though the official app has improved drastically over the past year or so, especially with the Material makeover, there are still plenty of excellent alternative clients.

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Comparing the best Twitter clients for Android (2017 edition) was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Android Police – Android News, Apps, Games, Phones, Tablets