Tim Cook says Apple’s wearables business is almost as big as a Fortune 300 company

Apple Watch

Steve Jobs used to make fun of Amazon for not releasing specific sales figures for devices like the Kindle, which is somewhat comical given that Apple over the past few years has refused to divulge how many Apple Watch units the company sells every quarter. As for the reasoning behind Apple’s decision, the company’s initial explanation was that it didn’t want to provide competitors with any strategic information about its brand new wearable. Even if you buy that argument, it doesn’t really hold weight anymore given that the Apple Watch has now been around for nearly three years.

That notwithstanding, Apple certainly isn’t trying to mask underwhelming sales. Far from it, it seems as if the Apple Watch continues to grow in popularity with each passing year. Most recently, and thanks to the Apple Watch Series 3, cumulative Apple Watch sales have exploded in recent months. As Tim Cook explained during the company’s recent earnings conference call, Apple Watch sales during the recent holiday quarter were higher than they’ve ever been.

Shedding some more light on the company’s wearables business overall, Tim Cook during today’s annual shareholders meeting said that revenue from Apple wearables (which includes the Apple Watch, AirPods, and Beats headphones) is now approaching the size of a Fortune 300 company. As a reference point, Cook this past May said that revenue from Apple wearables was comparable to a Fortune 500 company.

For some additional context, consider this: revenue from Apple’s wearables is now close to surpassing revenue from the likes of companies like Netflix and eBay.

Apple – BGR

Apple’s wearables business nearly size of Fortune 300 company, CEO Tim Cook says

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Apple CEO Tim Cook provided a bit of color on the company’s wearables business during Tuesday’s shareholders meeting, saying combined Apple Watch, AirPods and Beats headphones revenue is nearing that of a Fortune 300 company.
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GroupM Agrees Claims Majority Stake in Promising Indian Company

WPP announced Monday that its wholly-owned global media investment group, GroupM, has agreed to acquire a majority stake in The Glitch, a digitally-led creative agency.

The Glitch was founded in 2009 and employs around 200 people in Mumbai and Delhi.

According to a provided statement, that The Glitch’s full-service capabilities include digital, video and content strategy, interactive design technology, ecommerce, branding and media planning. Clients include Unilever, Netflix, OYO Rooms, Shutterstock, Tinder and others in the entertainment, beauty and FMCG sectors.

The Glitch’s revenues for the year ending 31 March 2017 were around INR 214 million with gross assets of around INR 175 million as at the same date.

We’re told that the acquisition will “continue GroupM’s growth strategy in one of the world’s most dynamic economies, and offer clients access to a wide portfolio of leading-edge digital marketing services and holistic content solutions.”

The post GroupM Agrees Claims Majority Stake in Promising Indian Company appeared first on Mobile Marketing Watch.


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Meet the company trying to break the taser monopoly

Last month, Digital Ally, a Kansas-based company known for its police body and dashboard cameras, announced that it had secured a patent for a new conducted electrical weapon. This marked the first time in more than a decade that a serious player in the police business showed interest in building a newer and better taser.

Ever since 2003, when one of the two companies making tasers bought out the other, there has effectively been a taser monopoly. If you’ve ever seen a police officer carrying a taser, that taser was almost certainly manufactured by the publicly traded company formerly known as Taser International, now named Axon Enterprise, Inc.

Axon’s version of the taser isn’t perfect. It uses copper wires to transmit an electrical…

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Facebook employees are next-level paranoid the company is watching them


A recent Wired profile details the lengths at which Facebook employees are willing to go to ensure the company isn’t monitoring their communications. The piece examines two years of Facebook’s struggles, detailing everything from its Trending Topics debacle, to the dismissal, acceptance, and regret surrounding the hijacking of the 2016 US Presidential Election by Russian operatives. From its beleaguered CEO, to the increasingly paranoid people manning its workstations, one thing is clear: there’s trouble in Menlo Park. What struck me immediately was the lengths some employees felt were necessary in obscuring private information, such as location data, from their employer.…

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