Some ‘distracted’ Apple employees accidentally walking into Apple Park’s clear glass panes, claims report

An amusing tidbit this morning highlights a potential flaw in Apple Park’s all-glass design. Bloomberg reports that some employees who might not have been paying 100% attention to where they are walking have accidentally walked into the clear glass internal walls of the pods that make up Apple Park. As a remedy, employees stuck Post-It notes to the walls to make them easier to see. However, these had to be removed because ‘they detracted from the building’s design’.

Whilst there are some markings on these panes, it seems employees haven’t quite adjusted to their new campus. Apple is still in the process of moving employees over to the new campus; at last count, it had permission to move in workers to 5 out of the 12 Apple Park sections.

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AT&T files complaint over “unsubstantiated, false, and misleading claims” in T-Mobile holiday commercial

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Back in December, T-Mobile uploaded a two minute-long short to its YouTube channel, in the style of classic stop-motion specials like Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. It mostly consists of T-Mobile CEO John Legere telling a story about how he saved the US wireless industry from the “abominable carriers.” It’s a mostly harmless video, but AT&T has decided to file a complaint with the National Advertising Division over it.

The ad only has 11,000 views on YouTube, and an additional 2.5 million views on Twitter, so the video’s impact wasn’t massive in the first place.

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AT&T files complaint over “unsubstantiated, false, and misleading claims” in T-Mobile holiday commercial was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Professional-Grade Acoustic Tests Support Apple’s Claims About HomePod’s Superior Sound Distribution

HomePod acoustic tests performed by Fast Company and published Tuesday appear to support Apple’s claim that algorithms built into the smart speaker make it capable of distributing sound evenly throughout a room.

According to Apple’s marketing material, music played on HomePod is evenly distributed so that it sounds similar regardless of where the listener is standing or sitting in the room. Apple also claims that HomePod’s output remains consistent wherever it is placed in an environment, thanks to sophisticated always-on sound processing algorithms.


HomePod uses its six-microphone array to record the behavior of the sound waves emitted by the speakers, while the algorithms analyze the incoming data to adjust the output of the speakers and deliver a consistent representation of a piece of music throughout the listening environment. Another microphone deeper inside the HomePod picks up the presence of walls and other large objects that might interfere with the distribution of certain sounds, like the long sound waves of bass notes, and the algorithms adjust the output accordingly.

To test the claim, a HomePod was placed on a 30-inch high table by a wall and a white noise test sound was played through it that produces an equal amount of decibels throughout the frequency spectrum. This output was recorded from four locations in the room, and then each sound profile was compared to see how much variation occurred across the full frequency spectrum. The testing gear used in the experiment was loaned by Liechtenstein-based acoustics company NTi Audio AG.

According to Brian MacMillan of NTi Audio AG, which provided the testing gear used in the experiment, the HomePod’s profile changed very little, with an average variance of less than 0.95 decibels across all audible frequency bands, which is considered below the threshold that can be heard by a human ear. Comparatively, the test team saw considerably more output variation from a Harman Kardon Invoke speaker, which had an average variance of 3.4 decibels.

In short, Apple’s claim that the HomePod can deliver a consistent representation of a piece of music throughout the room looks truthy.

“The developers have done an excellent job of having the HomePod adjust to the room; (it has) impressive consistency in overall level and frequency response,” said NTi’s MacMillan.

“The HomePod automates spatial compensation that previously required a real audiophile’s expertise, tools and time,” he said.

The HomePod’s sound has received praise by both new HomePod owners and media sites that tested the device ahead of its release, although Consumer Reports‘ doesn’t believe the HomePod outshines the Google Home Max and the Sonos One. Other reviews have disagreed with that analysis, including an extensive, in-depth review published by a self-professed audiophile on Monday.

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Man Claims to Be Time Traveler from 2030, Passes Polygraph Test

A man who claims to be a time traveler from the year 2030 has apparently passed a lie detector test when giving a handful of predictions about the future.

The man, known only as “Noah,” insists that he must remain anonymous and that his face must be blurred. Noah also claims that he is 50-years-old, but has taken an “age rejuvenating drug” to make himself appear 25.

Noah has previously given some predictions about the future in an interview with YouTube channel Paranormal Elite. But this time around, another YouTube channel, Apex TV, has subjected Noah to a lie detector test while he gave many of the same predictions.

Among them are forecasts about Trump being re-elected president, humans reaching Mars in 2028, and the introduction of robots that can independently operate a home. Noah added that artificial intelligence will be “huge,” phones will only get bigger, and that a Google Glass-like device will “take over” within the next decade.

Interestingly, Noah also said that time travel has already been invented but is being kept secret — and will only be made public in the year 2028. Also, someone named Ilana Remikee is apparently going to be president in 2030.

Noah claims to have hard evidence proving all of these predictions, but can’t give us it because of “paradoxes.”

Is It Fake?

The general scientific consensus is that time travel into the past isn’t possible. But suspending disbelief, there are other issues with these predictions.

Polygraph (or “lie detector”) tests are notoriously easy to beat, and their value as instruments capable of catching untruths is becoming increasingly weaker. According to the American Psychological Association, “most psychologists agree that there is little evidence that polygraphs can accurately detect lies.”

Similarly, Noah’s predictions are actually pretty boring. Apple is working on a Google Glass-like device, consumer demand is shifting toward bigger phones, smart home products are becoming increasingly mainstream, and Elon Musk seems pretty committed to sending people to Mars within the next few decades. One doesn’t need to be a time traveler to make similar predictions.

It’s also a bit suspicious that “Ilana Remikee” doesn’t show up in any Google queries or vital record searches. To be president in 2030, one would have to have been born in the U.S. (natural-born-citizen clause) in 1993 in order to be 35 (the minimum age) in 2028 (the closest election year to 2030). That person would be 24- or 25-years-old currently.

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GroupM Agrees Claims Majority Stake in Promising Indian Company

WPP announced Monday that its wholly-owned global media investment group, GroupM, has agreed to acquire a majority stake in The Glitch, a digitally-led creative agency.

The Glitch was founded in 2009 and employs around 200 people in Mumbai and Delhi.

According to a provided statement, that The Glitch’s full-service capabilities include digital, video and content strategy, interactive design technology, ecommerce, branding and media planning. Clients include Unilever, Netflix, OYO Rooms, Shutterstock, Tinder and others in the entertainment, beauty and FMCG sectors.

The Glitch’s revenues for the year ending 31 March 2017 were around INR 214 million with gross assets of around INR 175 million as at the same date.

We’re told that the acquisition will “continue GroupM’s growth strategy in one of the world’s most dynamic economies, and offer clients access to a wide portfolio of leading-edge digital marketing services and holistic content solutions.”

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