Web traffic from Chrome’s article recommendations increased 2,100% in 2017

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Over a year ago, Google added article recommendations to the New Tab Page on Chrome for Android. Even though it cluttered up the once-clean page, it has quickly become a major source of traffic for many websites. According to NiemanLab, traffic from Chrome’s New Tab Page increased a whopping 2,100% last year.

The data comes from Chartbeat, a content intelligence company often used as an alternative to Google Analytics.

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Web traffic from Chrome’s article recommendations increased 2,100% in 2017 was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Google Chrome’s next update will finally block autoplay videos that have sound

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Google is finally getting serious about blocking annoying autoplay videos that start with the sound blaring. The next update to Chrome (version 66) will include changes to autoplay videos that mean the browser will only play them automatically if the sound isn’t playing by default, or if you click and interact with the site, or have previously “shown an interest in media on the site.”

These changes were originally scheduled for Chrome 64, which arrived in January with an option to permanently mute annoying websites that abuse autoplay videos with the sound on by default. Google delayed the additional autoplay changes to Chrome 66, but they’re now appearing in the beta channels of Chrome ahead of a public release next month. Google’s…

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Chrome’s pull-to-refresh starts making its way to Chromebooks

Chrome on Chromebooks and Windows-2-in-1 devices is on its way to becoming more like its sibling on mobile. As lucasban has posted on Reddit, the pull-to-refresh gesture is now available on the browser's developer channel for those platforms. While t…
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How Chrome’s built-in ad blocker will work when it goes live tomorrow

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 Chrome’s built-in ad blocker will go live tomorrow. It’s the first time Google will automatically block some ads in Chrome, but while quite a few online publishers are fretting about this move, as a regular user, you may not even notice it. Read More
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Chrome’s ad blocker will go live February 15, here’s how it works

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In June of last year, Google revealed it was working on a built-in ad blocker for Chrome. But instead of outright blocking all ads, it would only block intrusive advertising, as defined by the Coalition for Better Ads. Pop-ups, animated or auto-playing ads, scroll-overs, and large banners are disallowed. Put simply, websites would have to play by the Coalition’s rules, or risk losing ad revenue from Chrome users.

In December, the company announced that the blocker would go into effect on February 15, which is tomorrow.

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Chrome’s blocker for redirecting ads won’t be turned on until April

If you frequently use your phone or tablet to browse the web, you’ve probably noticed how some websites randomly redirect you to a fake virus warning or other similar page. This is due to malicious ads breaking out of their frame, and forcing a redirect of the parent page to wherever they want. These harmful ads have infiltrated virtually every ad network, including Google AdSense/AdX.

Google’s solution to this problem is a blocker for redirecting ads, which was announced in November of last year (this is separate from the general ad blocker that will arrive later this month).

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Chrome’s blocker for redirecting ads won’t be turned on until April was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Google promoting Home Max on Chrome’s New Tab Page

Google’s new Home Max speaker is pretty great. It can become deafeningly loud, and includes Google Assistant. The only downside is the price – $ 400 is quite a lot for a speaker. It looks like Google is trying to sell more of them, because the company has placed a small ad for the Home Max on Chrome’s New Tab Page.

Web browsers usually get plenty of angry users when advertising shows up on the New Tab Page, and both Chrome and Firefox have tried it in the past (in Firefox’s defense, Mozilla doesn’t make billions of dollars in advertising revenue to support the browser).

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Google reveals how Chrome’s ad-blocker will work when it goes live February 15th

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Advertising is the lifeblood of Google, so the company has always had an understandably awkward relationship with ad-blocking software. Google seems to understand why people use ad-blockers, though. There are a lot of terrible ads out there, but blocking them all is bad for Google. That’s why Chrome is getting an ad-blocker for “bad ads” soon, and now we know how it’ll work.

Google will support the standards set forth by the Coalition for Better Ads in Chrome’s ad-blocker.

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Google reveals how Chrome’s ad-blocker will work when it goes live February 15th was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Chrome’s new security feats allow Google to scan what extensions you use


In a move to counteract the spread of browser malware, yesterday Google announced its plans to ramp up its security mechanisms in Chrome to make it easier for users to prevent and recover from unwanted software infections. But good intentions aside, there is one aspect of this implementation that creeps me out: the same measures put in place to protect us are also enabling Google to scan precisely what extensions we download to our browsers and how we use them. The push towards increased antivirus defenses comes only a week after reports broke out that a malicious adblock extension on the…

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[Update x3: Now in Chrome Dev] Chrome’s flags page is getting a makeover

Ever since the first release, Chrome has had a hidden settings page, found at chrome://flags.

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