Nest Cam IQ indoor gets Google Assistant via software update

Two weeks ago Google announced that Nest is joining its hardware team, the one responsible for products such as Chromecast, Google Home, and the Pixel smartphones. This made us look forward to more integration between Google and Nest products, and today the first step has been made. The Nest Cam IQ indoor is officially getting Google Assistant through a free software update. Once you receive it, you’ll be able to talk to the camera just as you would to a Google Home. Simply say “OK Google” or “Hey Google” followed by your command or query, and it will respond. According to Nest,…

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Nest rolls out Assistant for Cam IQ, a cheaper Nest Aware plan, and more

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Nest has been absorbed by Google’s hardware team, but that hasn’t slowed it down. The previously announced Assistant integration for the Cam IQ is rolling out today, and that’s not all. Nest has also announced a number of improvements to Next Aware, including a cheaper plan option.

We already knew that Google Assistant was coming to the Cam IQ, but it’d be understandable if you forgot. Nest announced that way back in September.

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Nest rolls out Assistant for Cam IQ, a cheaper Nest Aware plan, and more was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

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Google’s Reply app is shaping up to be the messaging assistant of my dreams


Last week, we heard that Google was working on Reply, an AI-powered app that lets you reply to texts from various messaging apps by tapping on contextually meaningful replies right in your notifications. I just sideloaded a beta version of it earlier today, and it already looks pretty promising as an assistant that helps you text faster. Once you’ve installed Reply on your Android device and granted it the necessary permissions, the app will take over notifications from services like WhatsApp, Twitter DM, Hangouts, and Slack, and add buttons labeled with responses; tap one and it’ll send it out instantly.…

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Create your own AI-powered voice assistant with Matrix Voice


The Matrix Voice development board is a Raspberry Pi add-on you can use to build your own voice assistant. I got my hands on a review unit to see if someone who is “code illiterate” could make something out of it. Some people have an affinity for programming and development. I’m not one of them. I’ve written about DIY Alexa projects before, but I’ve never had the opportunity to make my own. On first glance it seemed incredibly complex. Yet, somehow I managed to make it through the project thanks in no small part to the excellent tutorials and documentation…

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28 ways Google Assistant can make you more efficient

Google Assistant is artificial intelligence at your fingertips — but sometimes, it can be tough to know what to ask an omniscient robot to do.

I’m here to help. I’ve talked to my phone more than I’d care to admit (even before it did anything in response — boy, were those awkward times), and I’ve put together the ultimate guide to Google Assistant’s most useful productivity-oriented commands.

So clear your throat, grab your nearest Assistant-packing gadget, and start putting that virtual companion of yours to work.

(Google Assistant is available on Android phones and tablets running Android 5.0 or higher, on iOS devices via a downloadable app, and on certain Chromebooks and home speaker products. With Android and other Google devices, Assistant can typically be summoned via voice command or by pressing and holding the Home key. You can also download an app that’ll give you a more traditional home screen shortcut. Unless otherwise noted, the functions described in this article should work on any Android phone, but some of them may not be available on iPhones, iPads, or other types of Assistant-enabled devices.)

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