Google’s on-by-default ‘Articles for You’ leverage browser dominance for 2,100 percent growth

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

When you’ve got leverage, don’t be afraid to use it. That’s been Google’s modus operandi in the news and publishing world over the last year or so as it has pushed its AMP platform, funding various news-related ventures that may put it ahead, and nourished its personalized Chrome tabs on mobile. The latter, as Nieman Labs notes, grew 2,100 percent in 2017.

You may have noticed, since Chrome is a popular mobile browser and this setting is on by default, but the “Articles for You” appear automatically in every new tab, showing you a bunch of articles the company things you’d like. And it’s gone from driving 15 million article views to a staggering 341 million over the last year.

In late 2016, when Google announced the product, I described it as “polluting” the otherwise useful new tab page. I also don’t like the idea of being served news when I’m not actively looking for it — I understand that when I visit Google News (and I do) that my browser history (among other things) is being scoured to determine what categories and stories I’ll see. I also understand that everything I do on the site, as on every Google site, is being entered into its great data engine in order to improve its profile of me.

Like I said, when I visit a Google site, I expect that. But a browser is supposed to be a tool, not a private platform, and the idea that every tab I open is another data point and another opportunity for Google to foist its algorithms on me is rankling.

It has unsavory forebears. Remember Internet Explorer 6, which came with MSN.com as the default homepage? That incredible positioning drove so much traffic that for years after (and indeed, today) it drove disgusting amounts of traffic to anything it featured. But that traffic was tainted: you knew that firehose was in great part clicks from senior citizens who thought MSN was the entire internet.

Of course the generated pages for individual users aren’t the concentrated fire of a link on a major portal, but they are subject to Google approval and, of course, the requisite ranking bonus for AMP content. Can’t forget that!

But wherever you see the news first, that’s your news provider. And you can’t get much earlier than “as soon as you open a new tab.” That’s pretty much the ultimate positioning advantage.

Just how this amazing growth occurred is unclear. If there’s been any word of mouth, I missed it. “Have you tried scrolling down? The news is just right there!” It seems unlikely. My guess would be that the feature has been steadily rolling out in new regions, opting in new users who occasionally scroll down and see these stories.

And unlike many other news distribution platforms, there isn’t much for publishers or sites like this one to learn about it. How are stories qualified for inclusion? Is there overlap with Google News stuff? What’s shown if people aren’t signed in? I’ve asked Google for further info.

Do you, like me, dislike the idea that every time you open a tab — not just when you use its services — Google uses it as an opportunity to monetize you, however indirectly? Fortunately, and I may say consistent with Google’s user-friendliness in this type of thing, you can turn it off quite easily — on iOS, anyway.

Open the menu at the top right of any tab and hit settings. There should be a “Suggested articles” toggle — disable that and you’re done. While you’re at it, you might just head into Privacy and disable search and site suggestions and usage data.

On Android? You’ll have to dig into the app’s flags and toggle the hidden setting there. Not as user-friendly.

Mobile – TechCrunch

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Best Read It Later Apps for iPhone to Bookmark, Save and Preserve Articles

Best Read it Later Apps for iPhone and iPad

While browsing web or scanning through news or top stories, you come across some interesting stories. But due to lack of time, you can’t read them now. How would you be able to instantly access them later at your own peaceful time, read them even offline or use a personal narrator to read those favorite articles for you? Very simple. You would need these best read it later apps for iPhone to get things done for you.

Though there are several “read it later” apps at the App Store, these ten apps are the class apart. Read more to find out why I’m so fond of them!

Best Read it Later Apps for iPhone and iPad

Best Read It Later Apps for iPhone and iPad

#1. PaperSpan

PaperSpan iPhone and iPad App Screenshot

PaperSpan is a reader’s delight! It comes with several highly neat features that play a pivotal role in boosting your reading experience. To me, what makes this app so handy is the ability to auto-assigned your saved articles. That means you don’t have to spend a lot of time in categorizing your stories.

You can simply launch the app and search the sort of articles you wish to read or head into your preferred category. You will be able to read and manage your articles even offline.

Whatever changes you make will be automatically synced when your device is reconnected to the Internet. If you don’t want to use your eyes for reading, you can make the app read stories for you even when you are offline. That’s not all; PaperSpan also lets you keep track of your reading habits.

Price: Free
Download

#2. Pocket

Pocket iPhone and iPad App Screenshot

“Pocket” is where you can save your favorite articles, videos, and links to catch up with them at your own convenient time. You can customize the app as per your preference to have better reading experience. Thanks to the personalized recommendations, you will quickly discover the articles that interest you the most.

As it offers unlimited storage, you can save as many items as you want. Use text-to-speech functionality to listen to articles. Furthermore, it works with not just with Safari but also with Google Chrome and Firefox.

Price: Free
Download

#3. Valise

Valise Read It Later iPhone and iPad App Screenshot

Valise is a pretty simple read it later app, which lets you easily save articles so that you can read them at your own pace. All of your contents are synchronized with iCloud. Hence, you can access them from any of your devices.

The app allows you to organize and manage your saved articles comfortably. Besides, you will also be able to share them via email, Facebook, Twitter, and other mediums.

Price: Free
Download

#4. Instapaper

Instapaper iPhone and iPad App Screenshot

With “Instapaper,” you will quickly save stories and take advantage of the variety of tools to have a more enjoyable reading experience. You can select from several different color themes, change fonts and use spacing options.

Sort articles based on popularity, date, and length. Organize your saved articles neatly in separate folders. The text-to-speech feature allows you to listen to articles. You can control text-to-speech from your Apple Watch as well.

Price: Free
Download

#5. Reeder 3

Reeder 3 iPhone and iPad Read it Later App Screenshot

Reeder 3 comes with the support of several services such as Instapaper, The Old Reader, Fever, FeedHQ and more. You can use various themes like including light, dark, white and black to make reading more convenient.

Save any stories to Safari reading list and read them later. Share your top stories via Facebook, Twitter, and Mail. With rich user-interface and high-quality features, this app is primed to liven up your reading habit.

Price: $ 4.99
Download

#6. Readable

Readable iPhone and iPad App Screenshot

Readable has a unique 10-speed auto-scrolling feature that lets you scroll through your article painlessly. You can promptly load your Twitter account to search for usernames and hashtags.

Access all of your favorites to read offline without any interruption. The app allows you to share particular page position of any story as well. You can share articles via iMessage, Twitter, or Facebook.

Price: $ 2.99
Download

#7. Outread

Outread Speed Reading iPhone and iPad App Screenshot

Outread is primarily a speed reader app, but it also works as a top-notch read it later app. You can add your own ebooks or choose great novels to read from a huge library. Sync it with Instapaper and Pocket to access all of your saved articles.

Check out the reading stats to keep a tab on your progress. Adjust the speed and highlighter size to get along with your own reading speed. The app lets you save stories for offline reading as well.

Price: $ 1.99
Download

#8. Read One

Read One iPhone and iPad App Screenshot

“Read One” may be lightweight based on features, but it can get your job done with good result. With this app, you will save web pages and be able to read them even without the internet. Mark item as read or unread. Sync everything across your devices to catch them from anywhere. And, share some of the cool stories with your followers via Twitter.

Price: Free
Download

#9. Offline Pages Pro

Offline Pages Pro iPhone and iPad App Screenshot

Rated as a number one offline browsing app, this app is primed to take your offline browsing to another level. You can download the entire website (up to 50,000 pages) together with all the formatting, videos, images and documents to scan through everything peacefully.

You can organize pages with the use of folders and tags. With the fast page loading, it ensures you have a good time scrolling through pages. Backup, archive and preserve the specific websites. Furthermore, the app lets you import or export downloaded websites too.

Price: $ 9.99
Download

#10. Offline Reader!

Offline Reader iPhone and iPad App Screenshot

Offline Reader! Makes it very easy to save any web page. The app features a built-in web browser to let browse fast. It also allows you to save entire web pages including formatting, images. You can also play your favorite music and videos offline. It supports multiple languages like English, French, Japanese and Simplified Chinese.

Price: Free
Download

Wrap Up

With these apps available, you will have a much better reading experience. While popular apps like Pocket and Instapaper are excellent, other apps like Readable makes reading absolute delight. So, which one of these apps are you going to use?

You would also like to catch up with: best dictionary apps, best encyclopedia apps, best Safari extensions, and best speed reader apps etc.

Like this article? Let us know that in the comments and remain connected with us via Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus to read more such adorable app lists. Also, make sure to download our app on your iPhone and iPad.

Apple News Drives Significant Traffic to Stories, Publishers Can Pitch Articles via Slack

Apple News can yield a flood of traffic for news publishers, with the app accounting for as much as 50 to 60 percent of readership for some stories, according to a paywalled report by Tom Dotan for The Information.

Apple News has generated half of Vox.com’s daily traffic at times, according to a person familiar with Vox’s numbers. An executive at the website of a major TV network said Apple News has accounted for as much as 60% of traffic for some stories.

The report claims Apple has an editorial team of about a dozen former journalists, led by veteran Apple executive Roger Rosner, who decide which articles get featured in the Top Stories or Spotlight sections of Apple News, or in the News tab on an iPhone, accessible by swiping left from the first page of the home screen.

The editorial team in the United States runs a dedicated Slack channel in which publishers can pitch stories to Apple, which tends to favor big breaking stories, special features, and multi-part series, according to the report. Apple is said to have similar teams working with publishers in Australia and the United Kingdom.

The curation process isn’t praised by all publishers, as smaller to medium-sized sites say Apple News tends to favor big mainstream outlets, which get featured prominently when users first sign up for Apple News.

A bigger issue that publishers have with Apple News is that many don’t earn any significant ad revenue from the app.

Part of the problem relates to how it sells ad space next to stories. Apple initially used its ad team iAd, but it later outsourced sales to NBC. It has yet to integrate Google’s industry standard ad-serving tool DoubleClick, which publishing executive say would make ad sales much easier.

This may change soon, as Apple has supposedly begun to run a closed test of Google’s industry standard ad-serving tool DoubleClick with around 20 publishers, in line with a report from last July. However, it’s unclear when or if Apple News will roll it out wider, according to the report.

All in all, while Apple News has proved more successful than first expected, there is still some progress to be made as Apple aims to become a key distribution outlet for news publishers around the world.

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MacRumors: Mac News and Rumors – All Stories

AMP Stories make news articles on Google Search more interactive

Google launched the AMP Project (Accelerated Mobile Pages) back in 2015 in an attempt to speed up the mobile web. It’s had its share of teething problems, but it’s mostly been a success with its implementation in Search and the Google Feed. Last summer, it was reported that Google was working on “Stamp,” which would combine AMP pages with an interactive storytelling element. That project has now come to fruition, with the announcement of AMP Stories.

Read More

AMP Stories make news articles on Google Search more interactive was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Android Police – Android news, reviews, apps, games, phones, tablets

How to Use the Kindle App to Read Articles Offline

One of the lesser-used ways to take advantage of the Kindle app is to use it as a read-it-later service for articles you want to catch up on later… …and read all those articles offline! Also, this is one way to keep all your books and other reading material in one central location and save yourself the clutter of bookmarks or the “save it-forget it” swamp of Pocket. Remember, you can install the Kindle app on Android, iOS, and desktops even if you don’t own a physical Kindle device! Let’s see how its done in iOS. The process is similar…

Read the full article: How to Use the Kindle App to Read Articles Offline

iPhone and iPad – MakeUseOf

TNW’s favorite articles of 2017


As 2017 draws to a close it gives each of us a chance to reflect what we’re most proud of during the previous year. For TNW staff, there’s a lot to be proud of. As someone that gets to work with this amazing group of super-talented reporters on a day-to-day basis, I’m in awe every day of some of the amazing content — whether reviews, investigative pieces, humor, or opinion — we produce each year. As for the writers themselves, these are the pieces they’re most proud of this year. Have a look. Abhimanyu Ghoshal Stop supporting tech companies as…

This story continues at The Next Web
The Next Web

Facebook is testing subscriptions for Instant Articles on Android

Facebook has announced it will be testing news subscription models over the next several weeks for Instant Articles across the US and Europe, but only on Android devices. In July, news broke that Facebook Instant Articles would soon allow paywalled content, and in August, Facebook confirmed it would be adding subscriptions for Instant Articles.

Publishers participating in the test include Bild, The Boston Globe, The Economist, Hearst-owned properties The Houston Chronicle and The San Francisco Chronicle, La Repubblica, Le Parisien, Spiegel, The Telegraph, Tronc (The Baltimore Sun, The Los Angeles Times, and The San Diego Union-Tribune), and The Washington Post.

Facebook says they will be comparing two different models: one that allows…

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The Verge – All Posts

Twitter’s Popular Articles feature shows you the most shared stories in your network

Twitter launched a news aggregation tool today that collects the most shared stories by people in your network. Twitter calls it Popular Articles, and it sounds, looks, and works a lot like Nuzzel, the no-frills, RSS-like link aggregator that launched back in 2014.

Nuzzel has been a huge hit among journalists and other news-hungry Twitter users because of how simple it is and how well it works. So, it felt like only a matter of time before Twitter either moved to acquire the company, as it did with TweetDeck way back in 2011, or developed its own version of Nuzzel’s core feature. Twitter confirmed to The Verge that the feature is now available globally for iOS and Android. The existence of the Popular Articles feature was first reported…

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The Verge – All Posts

Google’s iOS app now recommends articles related to what you’re reading

Today, Google is debuting a new feature for its namesake mobile app on iOS that will recommend articles related to what you’re currently reading.

Now, as you’re on a webpage using the app, you should be able to swipe up to see additional articles that could be of interest. It’s built into the existing bottom bar that already allows you to start a fresh search or share what you’re viewing. (I was not able to swipe up and access the recommendations at the time of publishing, but Google could still be rolling it out.)

Once you swipe up on the bottom bar, a lightbox-esque display appears with automatically populated related content, without having to do any additional searches. Say you’re looking for the perfect way to roast a chicken: the…

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The Verge – All Posts

Facebook’s Instant Articles will no longer appear in Messenger

Shortly after Mark Zuckerberg announced that Facebook is working on a paid-content model with partner publishers, the company has made further tweaks to the way users can view external articles. According to TechCrunch, Instant Articles will no longe…
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