Wednesday briefing: YouTube headquarters shooter complained about ‘age-restriction’ of her channels

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

WIRED UK

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Video: Everything you need to know about AirPlay 2 in iOS 11.4

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Article Image

AirPlay 2 will bring new enhancements to streaming audio on the HomePod, Apple TV, iOS devices, and third-party speakers. We went hands-on to see how it works.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Quick Takes: WebKit Team Teases ‘Cool New Apple Products’ as Rumors Persist About Red iPhones

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

In addition to our standalone articles covering the latest news and rumors at MacRumors, this Quick Takes column provides a bite-sized recap of other headlines about Apple and its competitors on weekdays.

Monday, April 2

  • WebKit’s verified Twitter account teases “cool new Apple products” in the pipeline: WebKit is the open source web browser engine used by Safari on macOS and iOS, so the tweet from the Apple-owned account could be referring to a wide range of different products.

  • What Apple’s education announcements mean for accessibility: Accessibility expert and former special educator Steven Aquino believes that an iPad is far superior to a Chromebook in many levels of special education. Nevertheless, he feels there is enormous potential for Apple to go further. For example, he says Apple could broaden its new Schoolwork app to incorporate Individualized Education Programs.
  • Red-colored iPhones may still be coming: On March 21, 2017, Apple unveiled a special (PRODUCT)RED edition of the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. Rumor has it Apple may do so again this year with the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and/or iPhone X at some point this month.

  • macOS 10.13.4 and external displays with DisplayLink software aren’t playing friendly: In the meantime, DisplayLink has released a new version 4.3 driver that will enable clone mode, but not mirror or extended mode displays on macOS 10.13.4. The notice from DisplayLink’s website:

    We have become aware that installing macOS release version 10.13.4 will cause DisplayLink connected displays to go blank after the OS upgrade, with the current DisplayLink driver [4.1] installed. Functionality such as Ethernet and audio, where implemented, is unaffected. We have alerted Apple to this issue and are working hard to find a resolution. These features continue to work as expected in macOS 10.13.3.

  • Chrome Remote Desktop and Hotels.com apps optimized for iPhone X display: The updates are available from the App Store. The wait continues for a handful of other popular apps, including Inbox by Gmail, Google Authenticator, iMovie, and Amazon Alexa.

For more coverage of Apple, visit our Front Page, Mac Blog, and iOS Blog. Also head to our forums to join in the discussion.

Discuss this article in our forums


MacRumors: Mac News and Rumors – All Stories

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Facebook CEO Hits Back At Tim Cook’s Notion Of Not Caring About Customers If They Aren’t Charged

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

A war of words appears to be underway between Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Apple CEO Tim Cook.

[ Continue reading this over at RedmondPie.com ]

Redmond Pie

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

A Journal Retracted A Controversial Paper About CRISPR. The Damage Might Already Be Done.

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

A scientific journal just retracted a controversial study that claimed the gene editing tool CRISPR causes a number of unintended mutations, but it may be too late to undo the damage the paper caused.

Let’s walk it back a second. In May 2017, well-respected journal Nature Methods published a peer-reviewed study from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). The study claimed that the gene-editing technology CRISPR caused more than a thousand unintended genetic mutations in mice  way more than any other study noted.

If that were true, it would mean that CRISPR’s potential to treat conditions in humans, from congenital blindness to cancer, would have disappeared. And the millions poured into researching CRISPR would have been wasted.

The reaction was swift and brutal for those who still had faith that CRISPR could fulfill its promise. The stocks of the three biggest gene-editing companies — CRISPR Therapeutics, Editas Medicine, and Intellia Therapeutics — all took major hits.

Except the study wasn’t actually all that legitimate.

Shortly after Nature Methods published the paper, other CRISPR researchers began pointing out its flaws, calling upon the journal to retract the study. Nature Methods responded with an Editorial Note on June 14 highlighting these criticisms. Then, on July 25, it published an Editorial Expression of Concern saying it was investigating the authors’ interpretation that gene editing causes mutations.

Now, more than 10 months later, the publication has officially retracted the paper. On March 30, Nature Methods published an editorial noting the retraction and the primary reason behind it: “There was insufficient data to support the claim of unexpected off-target effects due to CRISPR.” There could be a few different reasons for that, as one researcher previously noted on Twitter:

 

The experts that had opposed the paper’s original findings were vindicated; the journal also published five expert critiques of the study.

So the misinformation was corrected (though, strangely, several of the study’s original authors did not agree to the retraction, as the notice points out). The system of scientific publishing still works, and errors were rapidly remedied.

All good, right? No harm done?

Perhaps not. There are some bells you just can’t un-ring, especially when questionable studies confirm people’s fears about a particular advance. The purported link between vaccines and autism persists, no matter that the paper that started it all was retracted, and no matter how many times researchers debunk it.

Gene editing in humans was already controversial before the Nature Methods study. Skeptics warned of a future filled with “designer babies” and increased income inequality. And that was all assuming that the technology actually worked. If they were looking for “proof” that CRISPR was dangerous, they now had a scientific study to bolster their claim.

Even with the retraction, that “proof” that gene editing causes mutations is already out in the ether. It’ll stick in some people minds, no doubt.

Some scientists, including Harvard geneticist George Church, weren’t worried about the dip in stock prices. “This seems like a great example of rapidly self-correcting science… I was never worried.  Some investors look for opportunities to sell high then buy back low and then watch the rebound — based more on herd psychology than lab science,” Church told publishing watchdog Retraction Watch

But scientists don’t just need to agree that CRISPR is safe and effective in humans. They also have to convince the public that it is, and that’s much harder to do when respected journals present flawed conclusions about gene editing as fact.

The post A Journal Retracted A Controversial Paper About CRISPR. The Damage Might Already Be Done. appeared first on Futurism.

Futurism

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Mark Zuckerberg Says Just Because Apple Charges Its Customers More, It Does Not Mean They Care More About Them

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Apple’s CEO Tim Cook had openly criticised Facebook and its CEO Mark Zuckerberg for the data breach that occurred due to the Cambridge Analytica incident. He called the situation dire and said that this could only be prevented if there is a well-crafted regulation in place. Continue reading
iPhone Hacks | #1 iPhone, iPad, iOS Blog
Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

President Obama ‘made the best decisions he could’ about Russia, former advisor Valerie Jarrett says

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

On Recode Decode, Jarrett says tech companies should work with the government to safeguard democracy.

As a senior White House advisor for all eight years of Barack Obama’s presidency, Valerie Jarrett says Obama used to ask his staff, “When are you going to bring me the easy decisions?”

“And we’d go, ‘Oh no, we took care of those,’” Jarrett said on the latest episode of Recode Decode, hosted by Kara Swisher. “‘You get the tough ones.’”

One of those tough decisions that has fallen under retroactive scrutiny was how Obama reacted to early emerging evidence that Russian-backed actors were attempting to sway the 2016 U.S. elections. Was there more he should have done?

“You make judgment calls every single day,” Jarrett said. “With the benefit of hindsight, we would all maybe do things differently, but I feel confident that based on what he knew, when he knew it, he made the best decisions he could.”

She expressed sympathy for the tech companies that she said weren’t aware that their platforms were “being used as a force for evil.” But she said there’s a more important role they can play in future elections, rather than merely looking back on what could have happened differently in 2016.

“It should be a united front of the private sector and government saying, ‘What could be more key to our democracy than preserving the integrity of our voting?’” Jarrett said. “We should all be really dedicated to that.”

You can listen to Recode Decode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Pocket Casts, Overcast or wherever you listen to podcasts.

On the new podcast, recorded in front of a live audience at South by Southwest 2018, Jarrett reflected on how quickly technology has changed — in politics and everywhere else — in just a decade.

The technology revolution is like no other revolution we’ve seen before in our country,” she said. “I remember, President Obama was in office when he asked me what I knew about Twitter, and I said, ‘You mean, like, all a-twitter?’ That was in 2008, and I had no idea what he was talking about.”

Today, Jarrett is something of a techie herself, serving on the boards of Lyft and 2U, and advising the Los Angeles-based media company ATTN. She said she disagreed with the idea that, since 2016, her fellow Democrats have become more “anti-tech.”

“I think tech is an incredible tool for good,” she said. “I’m not anti-tech at all. I want to figure out how to make tech stay as good of a tool as it can, and do no harm — or, do as little harm as possible.”

If you like this show, you should also sample our other podcasts:

  • Recode Media with Peter Kafka features no-nonsense conversations with the smartest and most interesting people in the media world, with new episodes every Thursday. Use these links to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Pocket Casts, Overcast or wherever you listen to podcasts.
  • On Too Embarrassed to Ask, also hosted by Kara Swisher, we answer the tech questions sent in by our readers and listeners. You can hear new episodes every Friday on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Pocket Casts, Overcast or wherever you listen to podcasts.
  • And Recode Replay has all the audio from our live events, including the Code Conference, Code Media and the Code Commerce Series. Subscribe today on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Pocket Casts, Overcast or wherever you listen to podcasts.

If you like what we’re doing, please write a review on Apple Podcasts — and if you don’t, just tweet-strafe Kara.

Recode – All

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

What annoys you the most about Android?

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Samsung Galaxy S8

Yesterday, in light of the impending launch of iOS 11.3, I decided to write up a quick article on what current, and former, users of iOS thought about the platform. Namely, what about Apple’s mobile operating system annoyed them the most. And while we might be a bit of a ways away from Google updating Android, I figured I should write a companion piece.

While some might want to argue just to argue, I think it’s safe to say that, like Apple’s iOS, Google’s Android has earned its place at the top of the mobile OS pile. Both have fought off competitors like Windows 10 Mobile, webOS, and BlackBerry to be the go-to options for millions of people across the globe.

But, even giants have flaws, even if they are completely subjective elements decided person to person.

I’m still a big fan of Android. The customization options are great, especially now that rooting isn’t such a requirement these days. But the broad scope of Android and its ability to work with so many other devices out there from companies that aren’t Google has always been a huge bonus in my mind.

I imagine I have to pick something that annoys me about the platform, though, since I’m asking all of you to join in. I don’t have an issue with the notification shade in general, but I am not a fan of the notification panel in general. The whole thing. It’s way too cluttered. I think the one thing that I’ve grown to like over the years is notification dots, because I don’t have to rely on that panel.

It’s probably one of the reasons why Android Oreo is one of my favorite releases to date — even if it doesn’t completely remove the notification panel from the mix, those app icon notification dots are pretty great.

I don’t see Google giving up the notification panel any time soon, which of course makes sense because I’m sure I’m one of the only people out there that has any kind of problem with it. Then again, with Android P on the way, I have noticed quite a few people say they aren’t fans of where the clock is going to be positioned now. But that’s probably a small thing, and maybe Google changes that before the public launch of Android P later this year.

It’s a small thing, but that’s where I’m at. What about you? Whether you’re currently an Android user or have been in the past, what about Google’s mobile operating system annoys you the most? Let me know!

PhoneDog.com – Latest videos, reviews, articles, news and posts

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app

Foxconn profits ride high on iPhone X, dispelling worries about Apple’s sales

How Complete Beginners are using an ‘Untapped’ Google Network to create Passive Income ON DEMAND

Article Image

Apple assembly partner Hon Hai — better known as Foxconn — has posted net income of $ 2.5 billion for the December quarter, reportedly linked to strong orders and consequent sales of the iPhone X.
AppleInsider – Frontpage News

Cash For Apps: Make money with android app