Sony and IBM stuffed 330TB into a palm-sized cartridge


While you weren’t looking, the storage industry has been working on some pretty crazy stuff. Sony announced that it teamed up with IBM Research in Zurich to create a new magnetic tape that can fit 330TB of files in a single palm-sized cartridge that typically could hold only about 15TB. For reference, that’s enough to store 3,379 compressed copies of all of Wikipedia on a single cartridge. You’ve probably guessed that this isn’t designed for home users; it’ll be deployed in servers and data centers when it becomes available. The new tape features a recording density of 201 Gb per…

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IBM scientists have captured 330TB of uncompressed data into a tiny cartridge

In a new world record, scientists at IBM have captured 330 terabytes of uncompressed data — or the equivalent of 330 million books — into a cartridge that can fit into the palm of your hand. The record of 201 gigabits per square inch on prototype sputtered magnetic tape is more than 20 times the areal density currently used in commercial tape drives. Areal recording density is the amount of information that can be stored on a given area of surface.

Tape drives were invented over 60 years ago and were traditionally used for archiving tax documents and health care records. IBM’s first tape unit used reels of half-inch-wide tape that could only hold about 2 megabytes.

Image: Sony
A cross section of the prototype…

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