Steve Jobs’ 2000 BMW Z8 Expected to Fetch $400K at Auction

Noting how the late Apple co-founder had a “penchant for German automobiles and design,” the New York City-based auction house, Sotheby’s, announced that a BMW Z8 roadster once owned by Steve Jobs will be heading to auction next month, where the ultra-premium automobile is expected to sell for around $ 400,000 or more.

In its official listing for the 2000 model-year sports-car, Sotheby’s details the vehicles’ rich-history of ownership, which includes its first three-years under Steve Jobs’ watchful eye. “According to legend,” the listing asserts, it was Larry Ellison — Jobs’ good friend and CEO of software-giant, ORACLE — who persuaded his billionaire buddy to purchase the Z8 back in 2000, suggesting it was not only a high-quality car, but also consistent with the iPhone-creator’s penchant for excellence in design.

After three-years of owning and maintaining the car in pristine condition, Sotheby’s notes how Jobs then sold it to “a person in Los Angeles,” who just one-year later allegedly flipped the car and sold it to a “Bay Area Tech executive.” Rumor then has it that some 18-months thereafter, the Los Angeles owner was remorseful over his decision to sell the Z8, and contacted the Bay Area buyer to purchase it back.

Though the car has been in use for over 17 years now, the auction-house noted how its only been driven for 15,200 miles during that time, and was otherwise kept covered, fully maintained, serviced and up-to-date over the years, ensuring its “good condition.” According to The Auto Channel, BMW produced around 3,000 Z8 roadsters during its four-year production run from 1999 to 2003, while it sold less than 2,300 of those here in the U.S.

Back in 1999, a base-model Z8 cost around $ 128,000 by order. However, buyers were treated to a range of noteworthy specifications including the car’s intricately designed, all-aluminum chassis; its powerful, 4.9 Liter V8 engine capable of producing over 400 horsepower; and its uniquely-crafted engine compartment, which was not only placed to allow for an “even 50/50 weight distribution” between the front and rear axles, but allowed the beast mobile to accelerate from 0-60 miles per hour in just 4.2 seconds, according to Motor Trend.

Jobs’ Z8 will reportedly go up for auction on Wednesday, December 6, 2017, as part of Sotheby’s “New York — Icons” event.

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White Forest Tower in Paris Will Fight Climate Change With 2,000 Plants

Enter the White Forest of Paris

A new high tower is being constructed in Paris, France, and it will be unlike any other building in the city. Instead, it will be made entirely out of wood, and adorned with a large number of plants.

Italian firm Stefano Boeri Architetti is behind the design, which has since been named Forêt Blanche (“White Forest”). Set to be erected in the Parisian suburb of Villiers-sur-Marne, Forêt Blanche will be 54-meters (177 ft) tall and will be covered by nearly 2000 trees, shrubs and plants.

Concept image of Stefano Boeri Architetti's Forêt Blanche/White Forest. Image Credit: Stefano Boeri Architetti
Concept image of Stefano Boeri Architetti’s Forêt Blanche/White Forest. Image Credit: Stefano Boeri Architetti

The lower floors of Forêt Blanche will contain offices and retail services, while higher floors will contain luxury apartments. All four sides of the tower will have balconies and terraces, with the East and West sides featuring a number of windows that will, as the Italian company explains, “allow the passage of sunlight all day, giving natural illumination and ventilation to the apartments and an exceptional panorama on the landscape of central Paris.”

Plants Are More Than Decoration

Incorporating thousands of plant-life species into the White Forest’s design wasn’t simply a stylistic choice. The firm explains in its announcement post that it wants to go beyond using trees and shrubs to improve the aesthetic of their structures — it also wants to contribute to the fight against climate change and promote biodiversity in urban settings.

As we know, trees absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and store it within themselves; they also provide shade and can cool the pavement beneath them, thereby reducing the overall temperature in a city — which are often lacking in trees. As discovered by researchers earlier this month in Los Angeles, pavements cooled by the presence of trees are more beneficial than the addition of reflective pavements.

While construction on Forêt Blanche is under way, Stefano Boeri Architetti told Business Insider there is as of yet no set timeline for completion. Meaning we’ll have to wait and see how the project progresses, and if its use of plants really aid the struggle against climate change. If it’s a success, it may prompt other companies to follow their lead.

The post White Forest Tower in Paris Will Fight Climate Change With 2,000 Plants appeared first on Futurism.

Futurism

Remarkable Images of London Show the City’s Evolution Over Nearly 2,000 Years

Like all living things, cities have lifespans. London started as a small Roman settlement along the Thames River. Initially encompassing just a few families, today, more than 8.6 million people call the place home. So take a moment to take a journey. Here are is a series of maps, paintings, and old-time photographs that show the journey of the British capital from the past to today.

Two recent archaeological excavations, in 1999 and 2010, suggest that there were settlements near London’s Thames River as early as 4500 BC. The area saw a widespread adoption of agriculture in the Neolithic and Bronze Age.

A 1974 painting of a Bronze Age farming settlement. Alan Sorrell/Museum of London Image (Source: British History Online)

The Romans founded Londinium (now called London) in 43 AD. This artist’s illustration of Londinium in 200 AD shows the city’s first bridge over the Thames River.

Image Source: Imgur

From the 7th to 11th centuries, Anglo-Saxons moved into Londinium. Their settlement was laid out in a grid pattern and grew to contain between 10,000 and 12,000 people.

An artist’s reconstruction of the Roman town of Venta Icenorum. Image Source: Sue White/University of Nottingham

Westminster Abbey, built in the 10th century, is a World Heritage Site and one of London’s oldest and most important buildings. Here it is in a 1749 painting.

Image Source: Wikipedia Commons

William, Duke of Normandy, was crowned King of England there on Christmas Day, 1066 — just after it was completed. By the 11th century, London had the largest port in England. In the 12th century, the English royal court began to grow in size and sophistication and settled in Westminster, a neighborhood in central London.

The Old Palace at Westminster. Image Source: Wikipedia Commons

In 1176, King Henry II commissioned a new stone bridge. Finished in 1284, the original London Bridge would stand for over 600 years. It supported homes and shops — which weighed down its arches over time.

“View of London Bridge,” a 1632 oil painting by Claude de Jongh. Image Source: Wikipedia Commons

The development of the printing press in the early 15th century made news available to the entire city and improved literacy levels. Coffeehouses also became popular spots for friendly debates.

A London coffee house, circa 1660s. Image Source: Public Domain

In the 17th century, London suffered from the Great Plague, which killed about 100,000 people. In 1666, the Great Fire broke out; it took the city a decade to rebuild.

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

The city became a major hub for trade throughout the 1700s, and the Port of London expanded downstream.

London Bridge, circa 1750. Image Source: Wikipedia Commons

During the Georgian era (from 1714 to 1830), new districts like Mayfair formed, and new bridges over the Thames encouraged development in South London.

London’s Trafalgar Square in 1814. Image Source: Wikipedia Commons

In the mid-19th century, London overtook Amsterdam as the Europe’s leading financial center…and the Royal Navy became the world’s leading military fleet.

London in the 19th century. Image Source: Wikipedia Commons

London was the largest city in the world from 1831 until 1925, when New York City superseded it. The growing population and increased traffic led to the creation of the world’s first local, underground urban rail network in the late 1860s. An extensive sewage system was also constructed.

London Sewage system being built in 1860. Source: WikiMedia

WWII devastated London starting in 1941. As seen below, civilians hid in underground train stations to get away from air raids, which killed approximately 30,000 Londoners by the war’s end. The city then slowly began to rebuild itself.

Bomb-damaged commercial buildings line London’s Cannon Street in 1941. Source: Getty Images

The city has maintained its place as a center of global power …

Piccadilly Circus in London, circa 1950s. Image Source: Transpressnz

… and today, over 8.6 million people reside there.

Aerial panoramic cityscape view of London and the River Thames in the 2000s. Source: Getty Images.

The post Remarkable Images of London Show the City’s Evolution Over Nearly 2,000 Years appeared first on Futurism.

Futurism

Porsche’s $2,000 Passport subscription swaps cars on demand

Like the idea of Cadillac's car subscription service, but feel its lineup is a little too… proletarian? If you live in Atlanta, you're in luck. Porsche is launching a Passport service in the city that gives you "frequent" vehicle swaps, unlimited…
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2,000 IoT sensors will monitor the Netherlands’ rail network — UK is the next stop

ProRail, a government-owned maintenance company, will be installing 2,000 IoT sensors to monitor rail network assets.

The sensors are from Strukton Rail company Dual Inventive and will be rolled out in the coming months in the Netherlands. 1,500 sensors will be installed on points with point heating; while 500 sensors will be used for other rail systems — including barriers and catenaries.

Each of the sensors will monitor the infrastructure for issues such as temperature changes in the rails. A low temperature may indicate a ‘point heating’ failure during the winter. In the summer, the sensors can detect whether rails may expand due to high temperature .

This data can be used to ensure the railways continue running safely and efficiently with as little downtime as possible.

“We want to gain experience with the application of new technology such as sensors,” comments Johan Schaap, infra availability manager for ProRail. “The sensors will be available for the four maintenance contractors that are active in the performance oriented contract areas in the Netherlands.

“They will be able to use the available data in their daily operations.”

As we reported last year, Siemens is making use of the IoT to great effect with their locomotive business in Spain. An example was given of a train running from Barcelona to Madrid 2,000 times over the period of a year, and only the once it was delayed longer than five minutes.

Siemens, similar to what Dual Inventive are doing, use sensors to ‘see’ and ‘hear’ what’s happening on the track. Infrared sensors track when they get hot, while Furthermore, audio pickups listen for when the wheels start to make a sound which indicates they’re misshapen and need to come in for repair.

“After a while, they began to use predictive analytics to predict when this machine needed repair so it can be pulled off the line at their convenience,” explained Daniel Graham, director of technical marketing at Teradata.

The end result of Siemens’ efforts cut derailments by 75 percent and potentially saved lives or prevented injuries as well as reducing operational costs. The remaining 25 percent of derailments were caused by human error.

Following the deployment of its sensors in the Netherlands, Dual Inventive have confirmed they have also begun work on digitising the UK’s railways.

“Having started in the Netherlands, we are now also contributing to the digitisation of railways in the UK on behalf of Network Rail,” says Lex van der Poel, managing director of Dual Inventive. “We advise rail infra managers worldwide to realise IoT in railways in a safe and sustainable way, involving the selection of the IoT infrastructure, communication networks, safety, and cyber security.”

Are you glad to see the IoT improving transportation? Share your thoughts in the comments.

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