There is no ‘gorilla channel’ book excerpt about Trump

Once more, it’s time to remind everyone that you should never take anything you see online — a screenshot, a picture, a piece of text — at face value. Today’s lesson comes to us via @pixelatedboat, better known as cartoonist Ben Ward, better known as the man who gifted us with the ubiquitous term “milkshake duck.” In response to the many circulating excerpts of Michael Wolff’s spicy new book about the Trump presidency, Fire and Fury, Ward posted a screenshot of his own.

Of course, Ward’s was fake.

In Ward’s screenshot, he includes information on how President Trump bemoaned the lack of a “gorilla channel,” and how aides subsequently scrambled to rig something together for the temperamental commander in chief.

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Fitbit has invested $6 million in glucose-monitoring startup Sano

Fitbit has invested $ 6 million in a glucose-monitoring startup called Sano, in what appears to be part of Fitbit’s larger plans to make its fitness devices more valuable for overall health.

The investment was first reported by CNBC earlier today; The Verge independently confirmed the investment.

Sano, founded in 2011, is a San Francisco-based company that has been working on what it describes as a minimally invasive, continuous glucose monitor, one you’d wear on your skin like a patch. The product doesn’t appear to have shipped yet, and it’s unclear whether this would be sold directly to consumers or whether it will require FDA approval. That depends on what kind of claims the company is making about the technology.

Minimally-invasive…

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Intel facing multiple class action suits over chip security flaw

Intel is facing at least three class action lawsuits over a recently revealed security flaw. The complaints, published by Gizmodo, were filed in Oregon, California, and Indiana by owners of Intel CPU-based computers. They allege that the vulnerability, which Intel learned about several months ago, makes its chips inherently faulty. Intel has helped provide security patches, but the complaints raise concerns that these patches will hurt computer performance, and aren’t an adequate response to the problem.

Researchers revealed two major CPU bugs, dubbed Spectre and Meltdown, earlier this week. The Meltdown flaw is specific to Intel chips, and it strikes at the heart of how CPUs process information. Security patches offer a workaround, but T…

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Samsung updates the Notebook 7 Spin with faster processors and stylus support

Samsung released the original Notebook 7 Spin back in 2016, and while it didn’t exactly make waves when it came to design, it at least offered plenty of power at an affordable price. And ahead of CES this year, Samsung is announcing an updated version of the Notebook 7 Spin that adds a quad-core eight-gen Intel Core i5 processor and support for an Active Pen stylus, while also cutting down on the weight for a lighter design.

Like the first generation Notebook 7 Spin, the updated model also offers a 360-degree rotating display — with the added stylus support, the ability to turn it into a tablet becomes a lot more useful. Although it should be noted that Samsung is selling the Active Pen separately. Along with the more powerful…

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These sunglasses record video like Spectacles but can post straight to Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram

Remember Spectacles, Snapchat’s video-recording sunglasses that debuted to great fanfare only for the company to lose $ 40 million after sales cratered? Well, another company is taking a chance on the concept with a pair of smart sunglasses called ACE Eyewear. While Spectacles could only post directly to Snapchat, wearers can use ACE Eyewear to live stream video and post clips and stills to Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube via a smartphone app.

Made by Acton (a company known for its electric skateboards), the sunglasses can take 8-megapixel photos and capture HD video. The camera view is a wide 120-degrees, and you take photos or start recording video by clicking the shutter button on the top left-hand side of the frame.

T…

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